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Full text of "The syllabus of Northwestern University"

I 



9 






r.id 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
LIBRARY 

Class Book Volume 

r 



N^\%P l# 



Je 07-1 OM 



I Wllilt JJOT IJiSUHE IfflY LIFE 



Until I find a Company that will guarantee some definite and reasonable 
return for payments already made, in case I accidentally neglect a premium or 
deliberately choose to discontinue the insurance. 

The Company of which you are search is the 

M assachusetts M utual T jfe. 

That you appreciate Life Insurance goes without saying, but the 
perplexing question with you and the majority of men is " Which of 
the many plans shall I choose ? " 

There are plans almost without end : Ordinary Life, Endowment, 
Life-Rate Endowment, Semi-Endowment, Accelative Dividend Plan, 
Five Year Distribution Plan, Return Premium Plan, Convertible Life 
and Investment Plan, The Bond Policy, Tontine, Semi-Tontine, Ton- 
tine Savings Fund, Free Tontine, and many others too numerous to 
mention. If you take any of the above named plans, there is a very 
strong probability that your circumstances will so change in the future 
that some other plan woitld have been better for you ; all this because no 
single one of these furnishes protection in its broadest sense. 

These facts being true, why not take a policy in which are com- 
bined ALL THE OPTIONS OBTAINABLE IN ALL THE GOOD PLANS ? 

This Company will write such a contract with more options and better 
results, all combined in one policy, than any other. 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES OFFERED TO YOUNG MEN. 



ESTATE AND GENERAL AGENTS WANTEDS 



JOHN A. HALL, M. V. B. EDGERLY, 

Secretary. President. 



E. P. ROBERTS. W. TREESE SMITH. 

ROBERTS & SMITH, 

General Managers, 
Office. 92 La Salle St., CHICAGO. 



Chas. Gossage fy Co. 

State and Washington Sts. 

Call especial attention to the high character of their 
Merchandise, together with their 

LOW PRICES. 

DRY GOODS , 

CARPETS , 

FINE SHOES, MILLINERY , 

BOYS' CLOTHING 

AND GENTS FURNISHINGS . 

GOODS DELIVERED TO AEL SUBURBS FREE OE EXPENSE. 



E. &, H. T. ANTHONY & CO. 

5Qi Broadway, New York, 

MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 

P hotographic I nstruments , 

Apparatus, and Supplies of Every Description. 

^F°Sole Proprietors of the Patent Detective, Fairy, Novel and Bicy- 
cle Cameras ; the Phantom Camera, the Light Weight of the World, and 
the Celebrated Stanley Dry Plates ; Anthony's Universal Roll Holder, 
Anthony's Negative Paper. Amateur Outfits in great variety from $9 up. 
Send for Catalogue, or Call and Examine. 
More than Forty Years Established in this line of Business. 



JOHN P. PIERSEN, 

Merchant * Tailor* 

420 DAVIS STREET, 

Always keeps on hand a Fine Line of Goods. Call and 
see them, and consult prices. 




BUNDE & UPMEYER, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




Fraternity Pins i& 

JlA, e/iV/lHlir a lerjq experience ir> feJass ]^ir)s arjd ]<yaelqe werl^, 
"^^ ^* we are able to rrjal^e llew 1 Tfriees arja quarar)tee Kirst 
cllass SZorl}. §)atisfacfior) (§Tuarar)teea. we Jpave orje ©[ tlje larg- 
est jew'elry factories ir) frje west, ar>a rrja^e all trje qooas we sell. 
Our prices are tl)e lowest, arja our worl} as qeoa as tljat of aryy 
easterr) rrjarjujacturer. Jffrices arja desiqrjs Jurrjisrjea Jree or) appli- 
cation, arja sex)t to aryy adaress. Js/iarrjerjas, Watcrjes arja Jewelry 
scrjl to resperjiole parlies for selectior). 

BUNDE & UPMEYER, 

121 & 123 Wisconsin St., - Milwaukee, Wis. 

WIGHTMAN & BURNET, 

ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR 

FURNACES, STOVES, RANGES, 

AND 

House Furnishing Goods, 

409 DAVIS STREET. 



P. RINGER. 



H. J'EIT. 



P. RINGER & CO. 



B O O K ° B I N|D B R S, 



52 and 54 Wabash Avenue, 
Fine Work a Specialty. CHICAGO. 



NORTHWESTER UNIVERSITY, 

E^hnston, Illinois. 

REV. JOSEPH CUMMINGS. D.D., LL.D., President. 

ONE HUNDRED PROFESSORS AND INSTRUCTORS, AND OVER FOUR- 
TEEN HUNDRED STUDENTS. 



The University includes the following Departments : 

1. The College of Liberal Arts, with four regular courses of study and 
opportunity for a select course. 

2. The Woman's College gives young women the highest advantages of a well- 
regulated home. They are admitted to the same courses of study and receive the 
same degrees as young men. Those who choose may pursue preparatory and acade- 
mic studies, and Music, Drawing and Painting. 

3. The School of Oratory. 4. The School of Art. 

5. The Preparatory Department. This gives opportunity for preparation 
for any college, and furnishes, under highest advantages, academic studies preparatory 
to professional or practical pursuits. 

6. The Conservatory of Music, in which all departments of Music are taught. 

7. The College of Theology. 

8. The College of Medicine. 9. The College of Pharmacy. 
10. The College of Dentistry. ii. The College of Law. 

The University is located in Evanston, which is the most beautiful suburb of 
Chicago, and is one of the best and most healthy summer resorts on the Great Lakes, 
having all the advantages of City and all the enjoyments of Rural Life. It is unusu- 
ally free from immoral influences. The sale of intoxicating drinks is prohibited by its 
charter within four miles of the University. 

For catalogues address the President, or Prof. H. F. Fisk, the Principal of the 
Preparatory Department. 

Qarreit Bifa&i@&% ImBiitmie, 



©^^FHCULTY <§) 

Henry B. Ridgeway, D.D., President, Charles W. Bennett, D.D., LL.D., 
and Cornelia Miller, Prof, of Prac- Professor of Historical Theology, 

tical Theology. Robert L. Cumnock, A.M., Professor 

Miner Raymond, D.D., LL.D., Pro- of Elocution. 



fessor of Systematic Theology. Charles Horswell, A.M., B.D., In- 

rles F. Bradley, D.D., P 

of New Testament Exegesis. 

ton S. Terry, D.D., Prof( 

Old Testament Exegesis. ment. 



^ t- ti t-w t^ t> c structor in Elementary Hebrew and 

Charles F. Bradley, D.D., Professor ' 

Greek. 

Nels E. Simonsen, A.M., B.D., Prin- 
Milton S. Terry, D.D., Professor of cipal of Norwegian-Danish Depart- 



FALZ TERM BEGINS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11. 



FOR CATALOGUE AND FURTHER INFORMATION ADDRESS THE PRESIDENT. 



Union College of 'Law, 

LAW DEPARTMENT OF NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. 

Fall Term begins September 18, 1889. 

^Thorough Preparation for trie Legal Profession. 
For Circulars address, H. BOOTH, 

No. 214 Opera House Building, CHICAGO, ILL. 

DREKA 

Engraving . and • Fine • Stationery • House, 

1121 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



Commencement, Class Day, Fraternity, Reception, and 
Wedding Invitations, Programmes, Banquet Menus, &c. 
Steel Plate Work for Fraternities and College Annua's. 
Designs for Annual Covers and Cartoons. 
Fine Stationery with Fraternity or Class Die, Monogram, Address, &c. 



All work is executed in our establishment, under our personal supervision, and only in the 
best manner. Our unequalled facilities and long practical experience enable us to produce 
the newest styles and most artistic effects, while our reputation is a guarantee of the quality of 
our productions. 

Designs. Samples and Prices sent on application. 

Fraternity Stationery always on hand. 

ifer REMINGTON 




IS THE 

ONLY 



TYPEWRITER 



With a compacc key-board that can be operated without 
looking at the machine. It is durable, easy to operate, turns 
off neat work, is the most rapid and most generally used of 
all machines 

50,000 IN XJSB3. 
Victorious over all competitors at all contests. Official 
award at Toronto, August 3. 1388. " On general writing, law evidence and commercial matter, 
Miss M E Orr won the Gold Medal for the Championship of the World." M Mr. McGurrin won 
the Silver Medal in the same class. "Both of the winners used the Remington Ttpewritbb."' 
May be returned within thirty days. C. O. D., if unsatisfactory. Circulars on application. 
Call and see recent improvements. WYCEOFF, SEAMANS & BENEDICT, 

J96 La Salle St., CHICAGO. 



Chicago Photo-Gravure Co. 



296 Dearborn Street, 



CHICAGO, IliLi 



PHOTO-PRINTS AND ARTO-TYPES, 



{Reproductions f^ojvi 



JlEGflTlVES 



^•Photos «* 



Paihtihgs 



COMMERCIAL ANP ARTISTIC WORK. 



Please note the Portrait Work in the present edition of 
"THE SYLLABUS,*' and give us a call. 



A. C. BUBLL, 

TREASURER. 



O. C. FOSTER, 

SECRETARY. 



TAKE ELEVATOR AT 



2ti 



WM. DEERING & CO. 

CHICA60, U.S.A. 

Largest Manufacturers in the World of Grain and Grass-Cntting Machinery. 




THE DEERING ALL STEEL BINDER, WITH STEEL BUNDLE CARRIER. 

^"Write for special circulars describing- the Deeringr All-Steel Binder 
the New Deering Mower, the Deeringr Front-Cut Giant Mower, the Deering 
One-Horse Mower, and the Deering Light Reaper. 



MIXTURES FOR PIPE OR CIGARETTE. 

THE KINGS, Turkish, Perique and Virginia. 

MELLOW MIXTURE, Turkish and Perique. 

TURKISH and VIRGINIA. 
••• PERIQUE and VIRGINIA. 

GENUINE TURKISH. 




FLAKE CUTS, ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE PIPE- 
VANITY FAIR. VIRGINIA FLAKES. 



■ / 2/l/iyi^- 



■* 



OLD GOLD. 
MONTE CRISTO, THE LATEST MIXTURE. 

SALMAGUNDI, GRANULATED MIXTURE. 



* KIMBHLL'S * 



Straight! Guts Gigapetsles 

Unsurpassed in quality. Used by People of refined taste. 

HIGHEST AWARD AT BRUSSELS, x888. 



The Finest Smoking Mixtures • • 
• • • are of our Manufacture. 
Fifteen First Prize Medals. 



WM. S. KUWBfllilt & CO., 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



S. A. KEAN & CO., B ankers, 

lOO LUashington Stfeet, CHICAGO. 

Receive Accounts, Issue Interest-Bearing Certificates of Deposit, Drafts 

on the Principal Cities of Europe, and Travelers Letters 

of Credit, and transact all business in the 

line of BANKING. 

* SPECIAL DEPARTMENT FOR LADIES. ~ ~ ♦ 

J83P Also deal in Choice Municipal ^Q^ D \?) and otaer Invehtment Securities , 

Paying the Investor from 4 to 7% 

NEW YORK OFFICE. - 115 BROADWAY. 



A. C. McCLURG & CO., - CHICAGO, ILL. 

*9i -) + ( ^^ fr- 

The Stationery Department furnishes designs on applica- 
tion for Commencement, Cremation, Ivy Ball, and Class Bay 
Invitations. -------- 

Oar facilities for the production of work of this class are 
unsurpassed, and the prices are invariably as low as is con- 
sistent with workmanship of the first quality. 

Every desirable style of paper for polite correspondence, in 
all sizes and finishes, is represented in our large and varied 
assortment. Where a high grade low-cost paper is desired, 
"A. C. McClurg fy Co.'s Pure Linen " is recommended. 

Die Sinking, Stamping and Illuminating. Rich Designs 
and Artistic Effects. ------- 

WABASH AVENUE AHD JVIADISOH STREET, 

Stationers. @ Publishers. * Booksellers. 



~"*" q) Students' Caterer. (9 ""*" 

ICE CREKM KND CONFECTIONERY, 

Class Socials and Parties Furnished on Short Notice. First-Class Lunch 

Room in Connection. 

407 DAVIS STREET, 



ERRHTH, 

Page 27.— Insert "Frederick J. Tourtellotte" under Bachelor 
of Arts. 

Page 44, 15th line, for " 1879 " read " l86 9-" 

Page 77, for " History of '88 " read " History of '89." 



1589. 



■*■«■ 



SYliLiABUS 



Published for the Students 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 



FRATERNITIES 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS, 



EVANSTON, ILL. 



VOLUME V. 



CHICAGO : 
P. F. Pettibone & Co., Printers. 



<RARY HOARD. 



II. F. HKiCdS, '89, B Q 77, Editor-in-Chief. 

C. B. WEIGHT, '89, 2 X, Cuts and Grinds. 
A. H HENRY, '91, <Z> K W, Literary. 

J. H. HAGGERTY, '91, A F, City Departments 
H. R. HOWELL, '89, <Z> A 9, Athletics. 

ELIZABETH B. EDWARDS, '89,^ <£, Fraternitiks. 

THERESA LUDLOW, '89, K K T, Preparatory. 
HELEN H. BOCK, ' 9 i, A T, Alumni. 

EVA R. HALL, '90, K A 0, Prizes and Events. 

CHARLOTTE E. LYFORD, '89, F B, C. L. A. 

:^ l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I M I I I I I I I I I %^r 



B. L. McFADDEN, '89, 2 X, Business Manager. 
EDITH M. CLARKE, '90, K K T, Secretary. 
F. C. Whitehead, '89, B © II, Mabel Sheldon, '90, A r, 

F. A. Alabaster, '90, K W, Edith M. Garton, '91, K A G, 
C. M. Denny, '90, A T, Livonia R. Kay, r <P B, 

G. O. Barnes, '90, <P A @, Anna E. Robinson, '91, A 0. 




(fco the (jxacuffy. 




78GQ 



College . of • Iiibehaik ■ Arts. 



FACULTY. 



An</U< 




A.M., Wesleyan University, 1840 (# B K) (0 N 9) ; D.D. T 
Wesleyan University, 1854 ; D.D., Harvard University, 
1861 ; LL.D., Northwestern University, 1861. 
President, and John Evans Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy. 



9r. 




A.M., Yale College, 1850 {4> B K) ; LL.D., Lawrence Univer- 
sity, 1878. 
John Evans Professor of the Z,atin Language and literature. 




A.B., Wesleyan University, 1846 ($ B K) ($ N Q) ; LL.D., 

University of Chicago, 1873. 
William Deering Professor of Natural History and Curator of Museum. 




Ul<? 




A.M. Noyes Professor of Mathematics. 

4 




A.M., Wesleyan University, i860 ($ B K) ( # N 9) ; D.D., 

Wesleyan University, 1888 ; Willamette University, 1888. 
Professor of Pedagogics, and Principal of Preparatory School. 




yU^yUT^l^C-C 



A 



A.M., Wesleyan University, 1868 (<£ B K) (W T). 
Professor of Rhetoric and Elocution. 



A.M., N. W. U., 1869 (<£ K W). 

Professor of Greek and German. 

A.M., N. W. U., 1871 (<£ K W). 

Professor of English Literature 




A.M., University of Chicago, 1869 ($ K W) 
Biblical Institute, 1885. 

Professor of Economics and History. 



-^t^t^C & 



D.D.. Garrett 




/ 



Ph.B., Michigan University, 1875 (^ & £)• 
Professor of Chemistry. 



A.M., Syracuse University, 1874 (A #) ; Ph.D., Syracuse Univer- 
sity, 1880. 
Dean of Woman's College, and Professor of the French language. 



<&* tf^crrd^ 



B.S., Dartmouth College, 1879 (^ A 77). 

Professor of Physics. 



/6f*/ft* fa<>~-<A 



A.M., Union College, 1856 (<£ B K) {A T). 

Professor of Astronomy, and Director of Dearborn Observatory. 



^3^—^ 



B.P., Syracuse University, 1876 {A 0). 
Director of Art Department. 




M.D., LL.B., Michigan University, 1868; LL.D., Michigan 
University, 1879. 
Instructor in Microscopy. 




"3^ 






SI/ 



PRESHMAN 






Officers. 



C. T. WATKOUS, 

ALICE M. GRAY. 
L. H. JORDAN, 
E. HOAG, . 

T. L. ALABASTER. 



Preside fit 
Vice-President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 

Chaplain 



Members. 



Xame. 
Alabaster, John L., # K W, C, 
Belknap, Frederick \Y.. >.. 
Burton, Alfred W., J T, C. 
Caldwell, Asbury, C, 
Clark, Mills F„ $J9, S., 
Converse, Wallace C, C, 
Cook, Edward H., S., 
Doble, William, J T, C. 
Drew, William P., J T. 
Ewalt. John Sealy, S., 
Fawcett, George E., $ K W. S. 
Ferglson, Olin D., Ph., 
Ferris, Edward L., Ph., 
Gloss, Samuel D., S., 
Graham, James S.. J 1", C, 
Gray, Philip M., S., 
Harris, Ralph A., $ J 9, C, 
Hartman, Cleander R., C, 
Hills, George Philo, C, 
Hoag, Ernest, B S 77, S., 

HOLLINGSHEAD, THOMAS C, C, 

Hunt, Myron H., 2 X, S., 



Evanston, 
Evanston, 
Belvidere, 
Chicago, 
Princeton, 
Chicago, 
Mendota, 
Evanston, 
Engiewood, 
Falls City, Neb.. 
Omaha, Neb., 
Malta, 
Yorkville, 
Evanston, 
Pomeroy, Manitoba 
Chicago. 
Ottawa, Kas., 
Chicago Pawn, 
Ottawa, 
Evanston, 
Evanston, 
Terre Haute, Ind., 



Local Add 

1202 Sherman ave. 
227 Chicago ave. 
34 Heck Hall. 
Heck Han. 
460 Emerson st. 
440 Church st. 
62S Chicago ave. 
Heck Hall. 
733 Chicago ave. 
Foster Building. 
617 Orrington ave. 
710 Emerson st. 
1300 Maple ave. 
1019 Sherman ave. 
903 Sherman ave. 

460 Emerson st. 
1040 Chicago ave. 
738 Orrington ave. 
301 Davis st. 
140 Hinman ave. 
2 X House. 



Johnson, Carl C, S., 

Johnson, Ernkst C, S., 

Jordan, Lewis H., S., 

Knox, Loren H., S., 

Leach, Howard E., S,, 

Lewis, Thomas H., B & IT, Ph., 

Louthan, Overton E., S., 

Ludlow, Edmund, 2 X, S., 

McConnell, James, C, 

McMaster, Edwin, IL, A V, G, 

Miner, Elmer A., Ph., 

Newcomb, George E., # A &, S., 

Noyes, Marshall P., # A fe), C, 

Nutt, John J., 2 X, Ph., 

Peacock, Frank W., S., 

Phillips, Charles A., B II, S., 

Power, Guy, Ph., 

Raymond, Jerome H., B S II, C, 

Reynolds, Frank A., C, 

Rogers, Logan A., M.L., 

Rundell, Charles L., Ph., 

Scott, John A., C, 

Sewell, Alfred B., Ph., 

Sherman, Charles K., $ A (~J, S., 
Shronts, Claude F., S., 

Smith, Newland F., S., 

Smith, Ralph Ham, S., 
Sturges, George P., Ph., 
Terry, Daniel W., Jr., $ K W, C, 
Towle, Edwin H., S., 
Traver, Charles T., S., 
Tucker, Frederick C, S., 
VanBenschoten, William C, .2 X,S., 
Ward, Elias W., $ K W, C, 
Watrous, Charles T., 2 X, S., 
Webb, Edward H., A V, Ph., 
Wilson, William L., S., 
Winter, William Abbott, Ph., 
Yegge, Charles F., S., 
Alabaster,FannieGrace,^4 3>, M.L., 
Babcock, Helen, A r, Ph., 
Berkey, Lulu Belle, K A &, Ph., 
Berkey, Rosalie May, K A 0, M.L., 
Brown, Gertrude LeRoy, Ph., 
Butler, Harriet Estelle, A r, M.L., 
Chattle, Mary, Ph., 
Chi; rch, Minn ie Estelle, K A G, M. L. , 
Clark, Harriet B., M.L., 
Colman, Laura Lucinda, M. L., 
Demorest, Mary Elizabeth, A <P, Ph., 
Fosi ik, Olive May, F <P B, S., 
Gray, Alice Maud, A <P, M.L., 



Evans ton, 

Evanston, 

Fernwood, 

Evanston, 

Gardner, 

Evanston, 

El Dorado, Kas., 

Paxton, 

Evanston, 

Pawnee City, Neb., 

Kaneville, 

Atchison, Kas., 

Evanston, 

Glencoe, 

Chicago, 

Evanston, 

Burlington, la., 

Evanston, 

Austin, Minn., 

Dunlap, 

Chicago. 

Fletcher, 

Evanston, 

Desplaines, 

Momence, 

Aurora, 

Alameda, Cal., 
Evanston, 

Stuyvesant, N. Y., 

Falls City, Neb., 

Evanston, 

Galva, 

Evanston, 

Aurora, 

Hampshire, 

Englewood, 

Waverly, Kas., 

Say brook, 

Boone, la., 

Evanston, 

Chicago, 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Evanston, 

Evanston, 

Aurora, 

Walworth. Wis. 

Dover, 

Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Muscatine, la. 

Evanston, 

Momence, 



634 Sherman ave. 

422 Cook st. 

211 Chicago 

235 Jackson ave. 
1503 Ridge ave. 

226 Chicago ave. 
Church st. 
615 Orrington ave. 
93 Sherman ave. 
207 Benson ave. 
458 Emerson st. 
Judson ave. 
418 University ave. 
1 113 Sherman ave. 
503 Ridge ave. 
845 Orrington ave. 
211 Chicago ave. 
724 Emerson st. 
628 Chicago ave. 

1503 Ridge ave. 
218 Chicago ave. 
Foster Building. 
738 Orrington ave. 

1503 Ridge ave. 
Church st. 

458 Emerson st. 
814 Hinman ave. 
Foster Building. 
1038 Sherman ave. 
13 13 Chicago ave. 
317 Chicago ave. 
Heck Hall. 
203 University Place. 
703 Chicago ave. 
440 Church st. 
608 Foster st. 

1202 Sherman ave. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
620 Orrington ave. 
740 Chicago ave. 
College Cottage. 
Woman's College. 
W'oman's College. 
College Cottage. 
College Cottage. 

1504 Ridge ave. 
College Cottage. 



Hamilton, Mary Emma, Ph., Xeenah, Wis. 

Hopkins, Minnie McClelland, S.. Evanston, 

HOUSTON, Bulah Lyon, r $ B, M.L., Evanston, 

Lloyd, Hei en Martha, A <&, M.L., Ravenswood. 

McCaskey, Harriet Louse, C, Chicago, 

Mack, Emily Butts, Ph.. Joliet, 

Mars, Jessie Gertrude, KA S, M.L., Marinette, Wis. 

Mason, Katharine Louise. M.L., Sterling, 

Meredith, Jennie H., A' A <-). M.L., Chicago, 

Mesne R, Fannie Adair, K K f , M.L., Cameron, Mo. 

Miller, Effie Windle, K K F, S., Kensington, 

Odgers, Clara Etta, M.L., Chicago, 

Osgood, Harriet Louise, S., Marseilles, 

Patterson, Mary Emma, r $ B, S., Fox River, Wis. 

Richey, Candace. J r. M.L., Evanston, 

Satterfield, Mary Josephine, M.L., Alden, 

Simonson, Anna Pauline, S., Clear Lake, la. 

Smith, Maude Martha, 7v A" T, S., Ceneseo, 

Stewart, Edna May, S., Joliet, 

Thompson, Harriet Anna, A <£, Ph., Chicago, 

Turrell, Zoe, S., Jacksonville, 

Wanless, Laura Ada, C, Mansfield, 

Wiley. Tessie Louise, KKT, M. L., Galva, 



Woman's College. 

438 Emerson st. 

227 Greenwood boul*d. 

Woman's College 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
College Cottage. 
1206 Sherman ave. 
468 Emerson st. 
College Cottage. 
738 Orrington ave. 
College Cottage. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
College Cottage. 
Woman's College. 




/. 




v^- 





10 
i. Freshman " Blow Out." 

2. Sophs congratulating before the Cane Rush. 

3. Soph after Cane Rush. 







\.D.Chi lDS &■ Co.Ch 



50PH07VT0RE^ 



% 



T. C. MOULDING, 

EDITH M. GARTON, 

A. H. PHELPS, 

E. J. RIDGWAY, 

C. M. STARKWEATHER, 



Name. 



Officers. 



Members. 



Adams, John Porter, B & II, C, 
Adee, John Nichols, Ph., 
Alden, William Tracey, 2 X, Ph., 
Corbin, Frederick Royal, C, 
Cozzens, Fred Bernard, ~2 X, Ph., 
Dempsey, Walter A., <P KW, C, 
Echlin Henry M.,BGII, Ph., (Gr.) 
Fleager, Arthur B., C, 
Haggerty, John Henry, A T, Ph., 
Harker, Ray Clarkson, A T, C, 
Haskins, Amary Sherman, C, 
Henry, Alfred Hylas, $ K W, Ph., 
Hensel, James Grant, S., 
Jenks, Livingston, C , 
Johnston, Sydney Paine, Ph., 
Mai.tman, Stewart A., # K W, S., 
March, Benjamin Franklin, S., 
Mason, Albert Sherman, A V, C, 
Moulding, Thomas C, # K W, C, 
Nisbet, Robert Kindrick, $ K~2, S., 
Phelps, Alfred Horace, ~2 X, S., 
Ridgway, Ekman Jesse, A T, C, 
Sawyer, Ward Beecher, B & II, Ph. 
Singleton, Shelby M., A T, Ph., 
Starkweather, C. M., B Q II, C, 
Stowe, William Carr, C, 
Tisdel, Fred Monroe, B & II, C, 
Walrath, William B., A T, C, 



Residence. 

Sandwich, 

Sycamore, 

Chicago, 

South Evanston, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Chicago, 

Toronto, Ont., 

Sheldon, 

Rockford, 

Shullsburg, Wis., 

Piper City, 

Evanston, 

Dover, 

Evanston, 

Chicago, 

Chicago, 

Oregon, 

Sycamore, 

Chicago, 

Evansville, Ind., 

Denver, Col., 

Galion, Ohio, 

Streator, 

Evanston, 

Woodlawn, 

Evanston, 

Kearney, Neb., 

Evanston, 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Chaplain 



Local Address. 

Hoag Building. 

628 Chicago ave. 

2 X Chapter House. 
South Evanston. 
2 X House. 
417 Clark st. 
Hoag Building. 
738 Orrington ave. 
835 Chicago ave. 
642 Chicago ave. 
835 Chicago ave. 
742 Chicago ave. 
1040 Chicago ave. 
Church and Orrington. 
708 Orrington ave. 
Davis and Orrrington. 
1019 Sherman ave. 
642 Chicago ave. 
417 Clark st. 
Davis and Chicago ave. 
2 X House. 
835 Chicago ave. 
Hoag Building. 
Evanston. 
Hoag Building. 

629 Hinman ave. 
Ravensw'd, D. P. Brown. 

1022 Orrington ave. 



11 



Barnette, Mabel Clare, A <P, Ph., Chicago, 

Bennett, May Louise, A <?, C, Evanston, 

Bock, Helen H., A r, Ph., Lincoln, 

Garton, Edith May, K j\ H, M.L., Sheboygan, Wis., 

Gloss, Mary E., K A &, S., Evanston, 

Hart, Alice, C, Aberdeen, Dak., 
Holderman,MaryBei,le,jT#73, M.L., Morris, 

Kay, Livonia Ruth, F $ B, Ph., Watseka, 

Kennedy, Lina, K A ®, M.L., Hinsdale, 

Logeman, Rose Minnie, Ph., Lake View, 

Maltman, Mary, A $, I J h., Chicago, 

Mattison, Myrtle E., Ph., Joliet, 

Mulvane, Marguerite, K A 6>, M.L., Topeka, Kas., 

Reed, Helen Gertrude, r <P B, Ph. , Cairo, 

Robinson, Anna Elenora, A #, Ph., West Union, la., 

Simmons, Eva Gertrude, A <P, Ph., Clarence, la., 

Smith, M. C, A $, Evanston, 

St aver, Ida Thorpe, A $, M.L., Portland, Oregon, 

Terry, Minnie Ruth, A tf>, C, Evanston, 

Tibbles, Dilla Hall, r <P B, Ph., Steward, 

Vernon, Luanna, M.L., Philadelphia, Pa., 



Woman's College. 

828 Hiiinian 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
1019 Sherman ave. 
742 Chicago ave. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
Lake View. 
Woman's College. 
Cottage. 

Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
742 Chicago ave. 
Woman's College. 
814 Hinman ave. 
Cottage. 
Cottage. 




Prof, to Class — "Dieses ist deutsche. : 
12 




13 




Wk uns 'uv Quit Fightin'.' 
14 




Freshmen 



The Cane Rush, 




15 



Junior 



C. H. ZIMMERMAN, . 
NELLIE W. STEWART, 
T. J. WOODCOCK, Jr., 
MARY EDITH CLARKE, 
A. E. CRAIG, 



Officers. 



D 



♦ 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Chaplain 



Members. 

Name. Residence. 
Alabaster, Francis Asbury, $ KW,C Evanston, 

Ambrose, Jay Brown, C, Evanston, 

Barnes, Geo. Oscar, $ A 0, S., Washburn, 

Barnes, Wm. D., B IT, C, Davenport, la.. 

Burch, Wm. Arthur, A V, Ph., Evanston, 

Claney, James Frank, A T, Ph., Jackson, Mich. 

Clarke, Mary Edith, K K T, M.L., Algona, la., 

Clifford, Caroline, r <P B, M.L., Evanston, 

Craig, Alfred Edwin, C, Evanston, 

Davis, Haskell Connell, C, Evanston, 

Demorest, Frederick Coe, AT, C, Muscatine, la., 

Denny, Chas. Morton, A T, Ph., DesMoines, la. 

Erickson, Edward Wm., C, Evanston, 

Farrel, Frederick James, $ A 0, Chicago, 

Fisk, Aurora Thompson, A T,C, Evanston, 

Grier, Jas. Parkinson, $ K W, C, Evanston, 

Groves, John Emmett, S., Cherokee, la., 

Haagenson, Anton Peter, S., Evanston, 

Hall, Eva Reed, K AS, M.L., Sycamore, 

Henson, Horace, C, Chicago 

Holden, Robert Hyde, A T, C, Baraboo, Wis., 



Local Address. 
1202 Sherman ave. 
425 Clark st. 
Foster Building. 
440 Church st. 
452 Church st. 
323 Hinman ave. 
Woman's College. 
620 Chicago ave. 
421 Clark st. 
326 Judson ave. 
47 Heck Hall. 
452 Church st. 
1334 Maple ave. 
317 Clark st. 
625 Judson ave. 
307 Sherman ave. 
723 Lake st. 
1213 Maple ave. 
College Cottage. 

425 Church st. 



W 




SO. Chilos & Co. Chicago. 



Humphrey, Wirt E., # K W, C, 
Jarrett, Amy, K K T, Ph., 
Martin, Riley Paddock, Ph., 
Morse, Isabel Russell, K K r, Ph. 
Parkes, Wm. Ross, A T, Ph., 
Scott, Elyin Elias, A T\ Ph., 
Sheldon, Mabel, AT, M.L., 
Shim an, Jesse Jay, 2 X, Ph., 
Springer, Geo. Ward, $K W,S., 
Stewart, Nellie Wood,^1 <P, Ph., 
Swan, Louise Emma, A r, M.L., 
Swenson, Wm., C, 
Tucker, Clara, K K T, M.L., 
Walrath, Ida Gazelle, M.L., 
Wickman, Maurice Leonard, C, 
Wise, Wm. Calkins, 2 X, S., 
Woodcock, Thomas J., Jr., Ph., 
Wyman, Ralph Lowell, S., 
Zimmerman, Chas. Hamline, C, 



Orland, 

Hinsdale, 

Rockford, 

Evanston, 

Milwaukee, Wis., 

Racine, Wis., 

Burlington, Wis., 

Chicago, 

Wilmette, 

Palatine, 

Elgin, 

Centre City, Minn. 

Galva, 

Evanston, 

Brooklyn, N. Y., 

Sycamore, 

Hinsdale, 

Sycamore. 

Evanston, 



607 Orrington ave. 
Woman's College. 
401 Davis st. 
418 Clark st. 
452 Church st. 
824 Chicago ave. 
Woman's College. 
2 X Chapter House. 

College Cottage. 
Woman's College. 
422 Cook st. 
Woman's College. 
1022 Orrington ave. 
422 Cook st. 

2 X Chapter House. 
317 Clark st. 

3 Cook st. 




17 







OJUL Yi a^Ks \ A • / 











S.D.Chi ids & Co. Chicago. 



4~ 



Senior 



* 



Officers. 



P. R. SHUMWAY, 
FRANCES E. HUBBELL, 
O. McG. HOWARD, 
G. W. DIXON, 
F. W. BEERS, 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary- 
Treasurer 
Chaplain 



Name. 



Members. 

Residence. 



Abbey, Charles Peters, <? K W, C, Chicago, 
Adams, John Quincy, A T, S., Des Plaines, 

Babcock, Florence. Ph., Chicago, 

Babcock, Mabel Keyes, C, Chicago, 

Bass, Stella, A <P, Ph., Evanston, 

Beers, Forrest William, A T, C, Evanston, 
Briggs, Herbert Fisk, B 77, C, Santa Clara, Cal. 
Brown, Harvey, B S 27, Ph., Evanston, 

Caraway, Blanche, A 3>, M. L., Tuscola, 

Dixon, George William, $ K W, C, Chicago, 
Edwards, Elizabeth B., A $, M. L., Evanston, 
Elmore, Arthur E., A T, Ph., Rockford, 

Farley, Samuel, A T, C, Marengo, la. 

Foster, Grace Ida, A <P, M. L., Chicago, 

Graves, Charles Stephen, $ K W, C, Sycamore, 
Hamilton, James Robert, Ph., Argyle, Wis., 

Herben, Stephen Joseph, $KW, C, Jersey City, N. J. 
Howard, Otis McGaw, 2 X, C, Glencoe, 

Howell, Harold Rivers, $ A &, S., Des Moines, la. 
Hubbell, Frances E., A #, M. L., Altona, 
Jones, Minnie, A $, C, Evanston, 



Local Address. 
1 1 13 Sherman ave. 
Des Plaines. 
Woman's College. 
2417 Michigan ave. 
724 Grove st. 
835 Chicago ave. 
625 Judson ave. 
Chicago ave. 

510 Maple ave. 

511 Grove st. 
510 Maple ave. 
Church st 
Heck Hall. 
Woman's College. 
307 Sherman ave. 
Heck Hall. 

417 Clark st. 
2 X House. 
717 Benson ave. 
Woman's College, 
College Cottage. 



19 



Kunstman, Gustav William, A T, C, Chicago, 824 Chicago ave. 
Leonard, HERBERT Gilson, A T, Ph., Minneapolis, Minn. Heck Hall. 

Ludlow, Theresa, K K T, M. L., Paxton, Woman's College. 

Lyford, Charlotte E., r $ B, C, Port Byron, 465 Emerson it. 

McFadden, Benjamin L., 2 X, C, Havana, 2 X House. 

Noyes, Lizzie Browning, M. l., Evanston, 516 Grove st. 

Peck, Mabel Ella, C, Owatonna, Minn. College Cottage. 

Richey, Mary C, A F, C, Evanston 738 Orrington ave. 

Shepard, Orlando, S., Chicago, 723 Sherman ave. 

Shumway, Philip R., B Q IT, Ph., Evanston, 605 Hinman ave. 

Townsend, Ada, C, Evanston, 719 Hinman ave. 

Weeden, Burr Miller, 2 X, C, Evanston, 472 Emerson st. 

Weir, Samuel, $ K W, C, Wilmington, Heck Hall. 

Whitehead, Frank Cole, B S II, C, Evanston, 137 Davis. 

Wright, Charles Burton, 2 X, S., W'oodstock, 2 X House. 




20 




21 







fat thi. f~ «■*•»■*»« * ** ** 



M J 




f Select * S tiJDe Hts * 



$ 



Name. Residence. 

Allen, Bertha Ida, Jacksonville, 

Allen, Clara Belle, Jacksonville, 

Asada, Yeigi, Evanston, 

Baum, Maude Luella, Sterling, 

Bonney, Alice Augusta, Chicago, 

Bonnifield, Lizzie Brooks, A r, Ottumwa, la. 

Boyce, James, Englewood, 

Brookings, Charles Mark, Du Quoin. 

Brown, Henry Morton, Capron, 

Brownlee, Alice Maud, Galva. 
Bucks, Florence Roland, K K T, Lockport, 

Burns, Mary Elizabeth, Piano, 

Butcher, Fanny Mary, r $ B, Chicago, 

Buxton, Mae L., Oskaloosa, la. 

Chapin, Frederick S., Evanston, 

Dixon, Thomas J., Evanston, 

Duffell, Howard P., Evanston, 

Espy, Charles W., Groveland. 

Evans, Raymond O., Mount Ayr, la. 

Fisher, Hattie L., Menasha, Wis. 

Foster, Sara M., A F, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Gammon, Samuel W., Chicago, 

Gerst, Daniel G., Chicago 

Golder, Lena, A r, Chicago, 

Harrington, Virginia M., Evanston. 

Hewson, Ella B., K K r, Kansas City, Mo. 

Holmes, Mabel, Wilmington, 

Hunt, Nettie J., Aurora, 

Jones, Lulu E., Black River Falls, 

Kamrar, Eva F., Webster City, la. 

Kindig, Frank, Taylorsville, Ind. 



Local Address. 
1040 Chicago ave. 
1040 Chicago ave. 
Asylum. 

Woman's College. 
824 Sherman st. 
Woman's College. 
524 Emerson st. 

109 Benton ave. 

College Cottage. 
College Cottage. 
1206 Sherman ave. 
Woman's College. 
Chicago ave. 
511 Grove st. 
516 Davis st. 



Woman's College. 
103 1 W. Lake St., Chicago. 

Woman's College. 

Woman's College. 
724 Grove st. 
College Cottage. 
Wis. Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 
203 University place. 



23 



Knox, Mary R., K A 0, 
Langstaff, Margaret, 
Logeman, Emma C, 
Mailley, Jamks, 
Moore, Laura B., 
Morrison, Alma E., 
Morse, Wehster E., 
Nash, William A., 
Newcomb, William H., 
Odgers, Joseph H., A T, 
Rawlins, Cora Moniner, 
Rice, Louise, A F f 
Sackett, George'L., A V, 
Scott, Lucy M., 
Sheldon, Carrie N., 
Singleton, Mary K., 
Smith, Julia E., 
Smith, Martha C, 
Sweeney, Hart R., A 2", 
Wait, Minnie M., 
Walter, Amy, 
Wilson, Mary Taylor, 



Topeka, Kas. 
Lexington, 
Lake View. 
York, Neb. 
Boise City, Idaho, 
Cedar Falls, la. 
Roxbury, N. Y. 
Carbondale. 
Chicagb, 
Chicago, 
Scales Mound, 
Evanston, 
Alameda, Cal. 
Moline, 
Evanston, 
Evanston, 
Topeka, Kas. 
Evanston, 
Geneseo, 
Jacksonville, 
Mitchellville, la. 
Blair, Neb. 



Woman's College. 
Woman's College. 



Woman's College. 

720 Chicago ave. 

714 Chicago ave. 
425 Church st. 
Woman's College. 
424 University place. 
Chicago ave. 
Woman's College. 
314 Dempster st. 
Hinman ave. 
College Cottage. 
742 Chicago ave. 
824 Chicago ave. 
Woman's College. 
937 Maple ave. 
Woman's College. 




24 



GojUKEflGElBEHT ^EEK. 



i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i 



i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i 



Friday, June 15. 

Oratorical Contest for Kirk Prize, 8 P. M. 



George A. Bass, 
Harvey R. Calkins, 
Edmund C. Quereau, 
Charles B. Thwing, 
William H. Tuttle, 



"The Anglo-Saxon." 

61 Puritan and Cavalier in America." 

The Declaration of Independence." 

- " Science and Humanity." 

" England and the Renaissance." 



Sunday, June 17. 

Baccalaureate Sermon, 10:30 A. M. 

President Joseph Cummings, D.D., LL.D. 

Sermon before the Students Christian Association, 7 .-45 P. M. 

Rev. John L. Withrow, D.D. 



Monday, June 18. 

Class Day Exercises, 10:30 A. M. 



Presentation of Class, 

Class History, - 

Poem, 

Oration, 

Prophecy, - 

Presentation of Gifts, - 

Announcements, 

Class Song, "Pipe o' Peace," 



Charles H. Booth 

Edward C. Page 

Mabelle Thatcher 

Frank Little 

Cora L. Allen 

- Columbus Bradford 

Pres. A. R. Edwards 

Composed by Helen M. Pearsons 



Annual Meeting of the Alumni of the Conservatory of Music, 
Examinations for Admission, .... 

Anniversary of Preparatory School, 



2 P. M. 

3 p - M - 
8 p. m. 



25 



Tuesday, June ig. 

Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees, 9 a. m. 

Field Day Sports, 2 J', m. 
Concert of the Conservatory of Music, 8 P. m. 

Wednesday, June 20. 

Address before the Alumni Association, by Rev. Roiseri Benti.ey, D.D., '62, 2 P. li. 

Business Meeting of the Alumni Association, 3 P. m. 

Alumni Reunion and Collation, 5 P. \i. 

Concert by University Glee Club, 8 P. If. 

Thursday, June 21. 



Commencement 

Helen M. Pearsons, - 
*Arthur Pattison, 
*Harvey R. Calkins, - 

Craigie S. Thoms, 

Charles E. Linebarger, 
*Arthur R. Edwards, 

Charles H. Booth, 
♦Frank Little, 

Cora Allen, 

Columbus Bradford, 
*Edward C. Page, 

Belle E. Alling, - 
*Edmund C. Quereau, 

Ira C. Cartwright, 

John E. Hunt, 
*Charles B. Thwing, 

*WlLLIAM H. TUTTLE, - 

Oscar Middlekauff, 

*Excused from speaking. 



Exercises, 10 A.M. 

" Matthew Arnold. 

" Individualism. 

" Locksley Hall. 

" The Evolution of Law. : 

" Poetry and Science. 

" Emperor William. 

" John Milton. 

"Tendency of American Institutions. 

" Ralph Waldo Emerson. 

" America as the World's Asylum. 

" The Problem of Our Great Cities. 

" The Poetry of the Future. 

" Ulysses S. Grant. 

" The Saloon.' 

" Henry Clay. 

" Gray and Darwin. : 

" Samuel Johnson.' 

" God in History.' 



President's Reception, 8 P. M. 



26 



Degrees QoflpEt^ED 



-->>.■ 



■■V*- 



Bachelor of Arts. 



Perkins Burnham Bass. 
Columbus Bradford. 
Henry Caddock. 
Harvey Reeves Calkins. 
George Lewis Conley. 
Eric Adolphus Davidson. 
Arthur Robin Edwards. 
Wellington Frizzelle. 
Caroline Louisa Hunt. 



Charles Elijah Linebarger. 
Frank Little. 
Norman Allen Martin. 
Samuel H. Middlekauff. 
Edward Carlton Page. 
Arthur Pattison. 
Craigie Sharp Thoms. 
Charles Burton Thwing. 
William Harvey Tuttle. 



Bachelor of Philosophy. 



Elmina Belle Alling. 
George Arthur Bass. 
Charles Stephen Bennett. 
Charles Horace Booth. 
Ira Chester Cartwright. 
Chester Carroll Clifford. 



Oscar Middlekauff. 
Helen M. Pearsons. 
Edmund C. Quereau. 
George O. Richardson. 
Mabelle Thatcher. 
Robert Oatman Vandercook. 
John E. Hunt. 



Bachelor of Science. 

Mary Hattie Earle. Isaac Reynolds Hitt, Jr. 

Bachelor of Literature. 

Cora Allen. Ellen Fowler Marsh. 

Julia Paddock Fitch. Mary E. Sumner. 



William Dyer Fullerton. 

Mary Henry. 

Jessie Brown Hilton. 



Master of Arts. 

William Russell Light. 
Gerhart Cornell Mars. 
Leonard Lawshe Skelton. 



27 



Master of Science. 
Charles Sumner Slichter. 

Master of Literature. 
Fannie Simpson. 

Master of Arts. 
Mrs. Elizabeth W. Andrew. 

Doctor of Divinity. 

Rev. Frank M. Bristol, A.M. 

Doctor of Laws. 

Hon. Melville W. Fuller, A.M. 




28 



«RIZB8c 

Qwapdesl ^inee publication 



GJ.GJS DEBATE PRIZES, '88. 

Charles S. Graves, '89, Samuel Weir, '90. 

ADEIPHIC ORATORICAL PRIZES, '88. 
Forrest W. Beers, '89, Columbus Bradford, '88. 

HINMAN ESSAY PRIZES, '88. 
Harvey R. Calkins, '88, Oscar Middlekauff, '88. 

OSSOLI ESS A Y PRIZES, '88. 
Mae H. Earle, '88, Mary C. Richey, '89. 

KIRK ORATORICAL PRIZE, '88. 

Edmund C. Quereau, '88. 

HERBARIUM PRIZES, '88. 
Jay B. Ambrose, '90, Caroline Clifford, '90. 

STVDEBAKER PRIZES, '88. 

Advanced German : Charles H. Zimmerman, '90. 
First Year German : Thomas J. Woodcock, '90. 

NORTON DECLAMATION PRIZES, '88. 
Anna E. Robinson, '91, Charles M. Denny, '90. 

29 




Officers— April to June, '88. 



C. E. LlNEBARGER, 

C. S. Bennett, 
R. P. Martin, 
J. E. Hunt, - 
S. J. Herben, 
M. L. Howard, 

O. MlDDLEKAUFF, 

G. O. Barnes, 
C. L. Stevens, - 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Censor 

Chaplain 

Organist 

Chorister 

Sergeant-at-Arms 



Officers— September to December, '88. 
A. S. Haskins, ------ President 

G. O. Barnes, --.-_. Vice-President 

R. C. Harker, - - - - - Secretary 

W. C. Wise, ------ Treasurer 

A. E. Elmore, ------ Chorister 

R. P. Martin, - - - Censor 

A. H. Henry, ------ Chaplain 

T. C. Moulding, - Sergeant-at-Arms 







Officers- 


-January to March, 


'89. 


K. 


P. 


Martin, 


. 


President 


J- 


Adee, 


_ 


Vice-President 


G. 


S. 


Graham, 


_ 


Secretary 


L. 


A. 


Rogers, 


. 


Treasurer 


A. 


E. 


Elmore, 


_ 


Censor 


A. 


B. 


Sewell, 


. 


Chorister 


0. 


D. 


Ferguson, 


. 


Chaplain 


A. 


S. 


Haskins, 


- 


Sergeant-at-Arms 



30 




Officers— Spring 

B. L. McFadden, 

E. C. Craig, 
J. J. Archer, 

B. F. March, 

C. S. Graves, 
Frank Little, 

C. H. Zimmerman, 
E. W. Erickson, 

Officers— Fall 

Charles B. Wright, 
J. P. Grier, 
T. J. Woodcock, 
W. A. Dempsey, 
B. M. Weeden, 
A. E. Craig, 
Harvey Brown, 



Term, '87-' 88. 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Critic 

Sergeant-at-Ar??is 

Chorister 

Chaplain 



Term, >88-'8g. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Chorister 

Chaplain 

Sergeant-at-A rms 



31 



J. 

A, 
A. 
L. 

J- 

F. 
R. 



Officers— Winter Term, 'SX-'X(j. 

P. Grier, - - - - - President 

P. Haagenson, - - Vice-President 

H. Phelps, - - - Secretary 

Jenks, - - - Treasurer 

L. Alabaster, - - Cliaplain 

D. Demorest, - - - Critic 



L. Wyman, 



Serjeant-at-Arms 







32 




Officers- 

Mary E. Sumner, 
Julia Fitch, 
Blanche Caraway, 
Lillie Kay, 
Lizzie M. Brown, 
Sara M. Foster, 
Bertha Call, 



Spring Term, >88. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Critic 

Marshal 

Chorister 



Officers— Fall Term, >88. 



Florence Babcock, 
Eva Hall, 
Clara Tucker, - 
Edith Clarke, 
Lizzie Bonnifield, 
Lina Kennedy, 
Theresa Ludlow, 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Critic 

Marshal 

Chorister 



Officers— Winter Term, '89. 



Frances Hubbell, 
Theresa Ludlow, 
Nellie Stewart, 
Lina Kennedy, 
Blanche Caraway, 
Florence Babcock, 
Gertrude Simmons, 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Critic 

Marshal 

Chorister 



33 




^Wen 



tietft 



Qitmy 




OFFICERS. 

EDWIN L. SHUMAN, 
S. J. HERBEN, 
FRANCES E. HUBBELL, 
GRACE I. FOSTER, 
O. McG. HOWARD, - 
CHAS. S. GRAVES, 



President 

First Vice-President 

Second Vice-President 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

Treasurer 



Philosophy •, 

Philology, 

History, 

Politics, 

Literature. 

Science, 



Chairmen of Sections. 

Grace I. Foster 

Lodilla Ambrose 

- Charlotte Lyford 

C. S. Bennett 

Frances E. Hubbell 

R. O. Vandercook 



PHILOLOGY SECTION. 



" Controversy among Philologists," 
" Universal English," 



Lodilla Ambrose 
Rena A. Michaels 



HISTORY SECTION. 



Period of Frederick the Great, 
Tamerlane and his Empire," 
The Italian Renaissance," 



Hugh D. Atchison 

Charlotte E. Lyford 

S. J. Herben 



SCIENCE SECTION. 



" The Significance of Plants,' 
" The Spectroscope," 



Chas. S. Raddin 
Chas. B. Thwing 



:m 



LITERATURE SECTION. 
" Robert Elsmere," - - - Wilbur F. Atchison 

'•' Text Books and Books," - Geo. P. Merrick 

PHILOSOPHY SECTION. 
" Origin of Moral Obligation," - - Herbert G. Leonard 

POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTION. 
M Temperance Legislation," - W. H. Tuttle 

ART SECTION. 

" Idealism and Realism," - - - Chas. S. Bennett. 



35 



tudents rf Knistian 



ssociation. 



O O O O OOOOOOGOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOO OCOOOOOCOOCOO 3 3 o a a 



OFFIC6RS. 



S. J. HERBEN, 
THERESA LUDLOW, 
T. J. WOODCOCK, 
S. S. HASKINS, 
GRACE I. FOSTER, 



President 

Vice President 

Recording Secretary 

Treasurer 

Organist and Corresponding Secretary 



COMMITTEES: 

DEVOTIONAL. 

F. W. Beers, J. P. Grier, F. M. Tisdel,. 

Minnie Jones, Mabel Sheldon. 

MISSIONARY. 

H. F. Briggs, A. E. Craig, D. O. Ferguson,. 

Kate Ogburn, Theresa Ludlow. 



MEMBERSHIP. 

F. C. Demorest, Grace I. Foster, T. J. Woodcock, 

Anna Robinson, J. L. Alabaster. 



+ jitkhtic jtmocimiion. 



OFFICERS. 

•O. McG. HOWARD, - President 

F. C. WHITEHEAD, - - - Vice-President 

T. C. MOULDING, ..... Corresponding Secretary 

FRED CHAPIN, .... - Treasurer 

H. C. DAVIS, ... - Recording Secretary 

Executive Committee. 

O. McG. Howard, F. C. Whitehead, T. C. Moulding, 

H. C. Davis, Fred Chapin. 

Sub- Committees. 

FOOT BALL. 

F. C. Whitehead, E. J. Ridgeway, 

J. A- Rogers. 

BASE BALL. 

P. R. Shumway, C. H. Zimmerman. 

O. McG. Howard. 

LAWN TENNIS. 

O. McG. Howard, M. P. Noyes, 

T. C. Moulding. 



FIELD DAY. 

W. C. Wise, R. K. Nisbet, 

H. M. Echlin. 



87 



One Hundred Yards Dash. . . 



Quarter Mile Run 



Throwing Base Ball Fred ( '. Waugh, '89 316 feet 10 inches 

Fred C. Waugh, '89, | 

Fred Chapin, '92, ( 

Putting Shot R, O. Vandercook, '88 33 feet 4 inches 

Running Broad Jump 15. L. McFADDEN, '89, 33 feet 7 inches 

F. ( IIAI'IN, '92, ) 

C. T. Watrous, '92, i 

, F. C. Waugh, '89, / 

Three Legged Race ■{ - 40 seconds 

1 B. L. McFadden, '89, I 

Sack Race F. C. Waugh, '89 10 seconds 



10^ seconds 



.62 se< 



Mi 



( E. L. Andrews, '90, / 

le Run •{ twt ^ tt , ' - 5 minutes 5 seconds 

I N. D. Harris, '93. i J 



Rope Climbing J. Loining, '94 



% % ?jc % % %: ^^sfcsfc^^^^^^^ * # * * * # * # 'A' % * 



Western College [Base [Baff Js>eague 



*- 



7*ND SCH6DUL6 



Members of the League. 
University of Wisconsin, Beloit College, 

Northwestern University, Lake Forest University. 



Officers of the League. 

E. J. RIDGEWAY, N. W. U., - 
L. M. RECKHOW, Beloit, - 



President 
Secretary 



Delegates to League Convention. 
P. R. SHUMWAY, O. McG. HOWARD. 



SCHEDULE OF LEAGUE GAMES FOR '89. 



N. W. U. 
U. of W 
U. of W.. 
U. of W.. 

Beloit 

Beloit 

N. W. U.. 
N. W. U.. 
L. F. U.. 
L. F. U .. 

Beloit 

L. F. U .. 



.vs. . .L. F. U at Lake Forest May 4. 

, vs . . . Beloit at Beloit M ay 4. 



.vs. . .N. 
.vs. . .L. 
.vs. . . N. 
.vs. . .L. 



W. U at Evanston May 1 1 . 

F. U at Lake Forest May 13. 

W. U at Evanston May 1 7. 

F. U at Lake Forest May 18. 

.vs.. .Beloit at Beloit May 25. 

.vs. . .U. of VV at Madison May 27. 

.vs... Beloit at Beloit June 1. 

.vs. . .U. of W at Madison June 3. 

.vs. . .U. of W at Madison. June 8. 

.vs. . .N, W, U at Evanston June 8. 



38 



university SHine. 



T. C. MOULDING, Captain. 
J. A. Rogers, E. J. Ridgeway, A. P. Haagenson, 

M. P. Noyes, H. H. Jarvis, VV. D. Barnes, 

F. Chapin, A. B. Fleager, C. C. Johnson, L. H. Stewart 

(9__ 6) 



university Eleven, 



RUSH LINE. 

Ff. R. Howell, -....- . Center 

O. S. Haskins, R. E. Kennicott, A. H. Henry, - - Left 

F. M. Clark, Fred Chapin, J. A. Rogers, - - - Right 

QUARTER BACK 
R. A. Harris. 

HALF BACKS. 

E. J. Ridgeway, T. C. Moulding. 

FULL BACK. 

M. P. Noyes. 



©. 



Jsiife Saving Crew. 



& 



Lawrence O. Larson, Captain. 

No. i. J. Nelson, No. 4. J. Loining, 

No. 2. C. T. Watrous, No. 5. G. E. Crosby, 

No. 3. F. Kindig, No. 6. W. M. Ewing. 



[Bicycfe CfuS. 



& 



Prof. ROBERT BAIRD, A.M., President. 
Prof. C. W. Pearson, A.M., 

Prof. C. S. Cook, B.S., 

C B. Thwing, A.B. 
W. C. Wise, J. J. Shuman, P. R. Shumway, 

C. K. Sherman, R. A. Harris, F. C. Whitehead, 

R. Smith, S. J. Herben, E. Ludlow, 

A. H. Phelps, L. C. Jenks, W. C. Stowe, 

M. F. Clark, W. D. Barnes, H. H. Jarvis, B. M. Weeden. 

39 



tfg^ of (^Jar (&n. 



E. B. FOWLER, Anchor. 
C. T. Watrous, Jacob Loining, 

J. G. Hensel, A. R. Hayes. 



(9 



CONTESTS OF ABOVE TEAM. 



February 4. 
N. W. U..vs..U. A. C won by....N. W. U. 



February 11. 

N. W. U..vs..U. A. C won by.. 

March 4. 

N. W. U . . vs . . Active Athletic Assoc'n . . won by . . 

N. W. U..VS..C. A. S. Turners won by.. 

N. W. U..vs..U. A. C won by.. 



. ..U. A. C. 



. . N. W. U. 

. .N. W. U. 
. . N. W. U. 



F. W. Beers, A. E. Elmore, W. R. Parks, C. M. Denny, 

W. A. Burch, J. H. Odgers, F. C. Demorest, 

E. J. RidCxEWay, R. C. Harker, A. S. Mason. 



40 



^J/l rusicai (^yrganiMations. 






The Karl Moellmann Quartette. 



D. W. Terry 
First Tenor. 




C. S. Graves 
Second Tenor. 



5. A. Maltman, 
First Bass. 



A. H. Henry 
Second Bass. 



The Delta Upsilon Quartette. 



J. F. Clancy, First Tenor, F. W. Beers, Second Tenor, 

C. M. Denny, First Bass. W. P. Drew, Second Bass. 



Phi Delta Theta Banjo Club. 

G. O. Barnes, Mandolin. 
Banjos. Guitars. 

C. K. Sherman, G. E. Newcomb, 

J. A. Rogers, R. A. Harris, 

M. F. Clark. P. J. Davis. 

F. J. Farrell, Piano. 



Unioersity Cornet Band. 



Prof. C. M. Hutchin; 

F. A. Alabaster, First Comet, 
C. COOK, Second Cornet, 
H. M. Brown, Alto, 
H. P. Duffell, Alto, 
E. C. Haagenson, Alto. 



First Cornet, Leader. 

E. J. Dietz, Baritone, 
R. Davis, Baritone, 

F. W. Leavitt, Tenor, 
H. B. Judson, Bass, 
P. Davis. Bass. 



41 



Sigma Chi Orchestra. 



B. M. WEEDEN, Leader. 
W. C. Wise, First Violin, A. II. Phelps, First Jianjo, 

B. F. Howard, Second Violin, J. J. Nl TT, Second Banjo, 
Giles Hubbard, First Guitar, B. L. McFadden, Piano, 

C. B. Wright, Second Guitar, J. J. Siicman, 2?0«*m and Harmonica. 



Freshman Quartette. 



John S. Ewalt, First Tenor, ALFRED B. SEWELL, Second Tenor, 

GEORGE P. STURGES, First Bass, Edwin II. TOWLE, Second Bass. 



first Soprano. 
Pearl Minnick, 
Ida Staver. 



Sappho Sextette. 



Second Soprano. 
Rose Berkey, 
Louise Swan. 



Alto. 
Anna Rohinson, 
Lillian Prescot j 




Sophomore Essay —"The horse, it is a noble animal. 



42 




Julius Field Kellogg, A.M. 

fioyes Professor of mathematics. 



[jp^S||fROFESSOR Julius Field Kellogg, A.M., Noyes Profes- 
SlsT (fc3$) HI sor °f Mathematics, has been identified during twenty 
years with the educational interests of Northwestern Uni- 
versity. Some teachers are like ships that cast anchor for 



a time — but we never know what tide may bear them 
away. Others are like the oaks upon our campus — that take firm root 
and with every succeeding year gain new strength, beauty and use- 
fulness, and the " old student," returning to his Alma Mater, expects to 
see their beloved faces and hear their kindly greeting, as sure as he 
expects to see the " old oak," which, in its rugged perennial beauty, 
excels its stripling brothers, and remains, not a memory, but a present 
joy and inspiration. 

Professor Kellogg was born February 4, 1830, in Cortland County, 
New York, and prepared for college at Kingston Academy, Kingston, 
Ohio. In 1 85 1 he entered Brown University, where he laid the foun- 
dation for that solid and thorough scholarship for which he has always 
been eminent in his educational work. Obliged, on account of finan- 
cial considerations, to relinquish his desire to complete his course at 
Brown University, in 1853 he accepted a position as Professor of 
Mathematics in the Providence Conference Seminary at East Green- 

43 



wich, Rhode Island — the institution now known as East Greenwich 
Academy. 

In 1859, hi s scholarly attainments and ripe scholarship were fit- 
tingly recognized by the trustees and faculty of Lawrence University, 
at Appleton, Wisconsin, who conferred upon him the degree of A.M. 
In the same year he accepted the position of Assistant Principal and 
Professor of Mathematics in Clark Seminary, at Aurora, Illinois — the 
institution since known as Jennings Seminary. 

In 1863 he was called to Lawrence University, at Appleton, Wis- 
consin, as Professor of Mathematics. After four years of eminently 
successful work in that institution, he resigned to accept the position 
of Actuary for the Mutual Life Insurance Company, and was located 
at Chicago. One year later, under President E. O. Haven, he was 
elected Professor of Civil Engineering in the Northwestern University, 
and entered upon his duties in September, 1879. I R I ^7 I > his depart- 
ment was changed to that of Mathematics and Astronomy. In 1875, 
Professor Kellogg was appointed, by President Grant, one of the 
Board of Examiners at West Point, New York. 

Such, in outline, is the record of Professor Kellogg's earnest, use- 
ful and honorable life. A ripe scholar, masterful in his work, genial 
and kindly in spirit and bearing, he is one of those teachers who win 
not only the esteem, but the confidence and affectionate remembrance 
of their students. And it is the earnest and confident hope of the 
students and friends of the University, that his present strength and 
vigor may long enable him to give to his department the benefit of 
his ripe experience and scholarship. 




44 



THE NORTHWESTERN 



Northwestern University. 



vol. ix. 



EVANSTON, ILL., MARCH 15, 1889,. 



NO. 10 



The Northwestern. 



Published Weekly Throughout the College Year by 
the Students op Northwestern University. 



One Year, (three college terras) $2.00 

Two College Terms i.v> 

One College Term 75 

Single Copy 10 

AH business communications should be addressed to 

E. E. Scott, Business Manager. 

KDITOR-IN-CHIEF CHAS. a GRAVES, '8o 

associate editors. 

rrrnoADv fC. H. Zimmerman, '90 

literary J Eva R Hall> >go 



Locals 



f C. B. Wright. "89. . 
(Clara Tucker, "90. 

Personals J. J. Shgman, "go. 

Exchanges R. C Harker, 91. 

correspondents. 

Preparatory John Anderson 

Sarrett Biblical Institute _H. K. Vernon. 

MedicaU Department P. J. Campbell. 

La* Department W. H. Turtle. 

College of Pharmacy ._ „ jobD jr Magee. 

Twentieth Century Club .... Miss Lodilla Ambrose. 



Editorial. 



r* OOD news to all departments of the Uni- 






versity ! good news to all friends of the 



institution, both wiihin and without its col- 
lege walls! A new scholarship in Northwest- 
ern. University has been established by' the 
editors of the Chicago Herald, a scholarship, 
instituted and made permanent by one of Chi- 
cago's most prominent newspaper men. Dr. 
Sheppard was notihed of the fact last Thurs- 
day morning and given authority to make the 
news public. Particulars have not yet been 
arranged, but will be announced at a later 
date In the meantime all praise to the pub- 
lishers, whose generous motives prompted the 
gift . all honor to the members of our own 



faculty, who have awakened the newspaper 
interest of the great city and made the scholar- 
ship possible. 



npHE sight of the examinations posted 
-*- again upon the bulletin board reminds 
everyone that the winter term for '89 is almost 
ended ; that June, with its commencement 
week, is not so very far away ; and that the 
halls now echoing to the strains of the Senior 
Glee Club will soon stand silent and deserted. 
Poor old University ! How lonesome it will 

-feel when the present Senior class migrates; 
for four years they have been the pride and 
joy of its bosom, the light upon its hearthstone, 
the wormwood and the gall of its existeuce — 
especially the gall. The smile will fade away 
upon Peter Johnson's face ; Garwood will 
break up in business ; Dr. Cummings will 
wander aimlessly about and the Dean will 
refuse to be comfort, d. The parting of friends 
is always sad, always sad and mournful How 
touching it is, therefore, between those who 
for years have answered ' Present ' for each 

■ other at roll-call and matched pennies behind 
the same book cover. We can see it all now. 
There will be all .the gaiety, music and laugh- 
ter-crf Commencement, then, as the lights are 
put out in the Methodist church and the tones 
oftbe orchestra, die 'away, the class will stand 
for one moment with clasped hands, ga/.e with 
emotion into each other's eyes, wipe the cold, 
damp sobs from their coat collars, and leave 
town before morning. The next day Mag 
nusonwill probably be looking for the most of 
them at iheir^, rooms, but the familiar place- 
Slrall know-ihem.no longer 



45 



FEBRUARY 2 2nd, iSSg. 

'Rah! 'Rah! 'Hah! Zip! Boom! Bah! fll'mi U! 



1 1 1 1 1 1 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 \ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



•»- 



C O 7UT7VI I TT6 e S 



H. F. Briggs, 
S. J. Herben, . 
Stella Bass, 
O. M. Howard, 
W. E. Humphrey, 
P. R. Shumway, 



General Arrangements. 

Program. 

Decoration and Colors. 

Finance. 

Refreshments. 

Introduction. 



Program of the Day. 

Assemble at M. E. Church, .... 

Reception at Woman's College, 

Inspection of Buildings, ..... 
-Gymnasium Exhibition, .... 

Dinner at the Avenue House, .... 
General Reception at M. E. Church, 



1.30 p. M. 

2 to 3 P. M. 

3 to 4 P. If. 

4.30 P. M. 
5.4O P. M. 
7.3O P. M. 



Program of General Reception at the M. M. Church, 7.30 P. M. 

Toastmaster, .... 



Prayer. 



Address of Welcome, 

Music, ..... 

" The Modern Lawyer," 

Music, ...... 

" Pharmacy a Profession," 

" The Dental Department," 

Solo, ..... 

"Placebos," ..... 

Reading. ..... 

Music, ...... 

"The Theologian in the Study and in the Pulpit,' 
Music, ...... 

" Cui Bono," .... 

College Song 



Prof. A. V. E. Young. (C. L. A.) 
Music — Orchestra. 

Miner Raymond, D.D. (G. B. I.) 
Music — Orchestra. 

Oliver Marcy, LL.D., (C. L. A.) 

Northwestern Quartet. 

. J. H. Hopkins, (U. C. L.) 

Sappho Sexette 

John J. Magee, (I. C. P.) 

W. B. McCord, (C. D. S.) 

Prof. Phillips, (C. M.) 

J. P. Houston, (C. M. C.) 

Kate Patrick, (C. S. O.) 

Quartet 

C. A. Place, (G. B. I.) 

Quartet 

Harvey Brown, (C. L. A.) 



46 




UNIVERSITY HALL, SHOWING CAMPUS, LOOKING NORTH-EAST. 




OLD OAK, FROM SOUTH-WEST CORNER OF CAMPUS, LOOKING TOWARD PRES. CUMMINGS' 



Hi 




g*P^ 


f51W««^ 


..... 


?j ^ 5 ^ 




^m 








jy 


w 




wK&**.~%z* '^j^sBfesi 




uijjj^ja^Sk^' 


IIK^NS/" 


^j 




j^^^, W,4fll 


K***..*? 


gT' ''"^^./-gK 


^\\La£Si 


ISi!^- 






Sfcs 


2=aK^r^f| 



GOItliEGE f HftTEHNHIES 



/;? M# Order of Longest Coniinuous 



enae. 




4? 



SIG7VSH ©HI. 



Founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, June 28, 1855. 



COIiO^S : BliUH fljMD GOIaD. 



Active Chapters. 



University of Pennsylvania, 
University of Lewisburg, 
Lafayette College, 
Dickinson College, 
Pennsylvania College, 
Stevens Institute of Technology, 
Mass. Institute of Technology, 
University of Virginia, 
Washington and Lee University, 
Roanoke College, 
Randolph-Macon College, 
Hampden-Sidney College, 
Virginia Military College, 
Ohio Wesleyan, 
Wooster University, 
University of Cincinnati, 
Ohio State University, 
Denison University, 
Center College, 

University of 



University of Texas, 
Tulane University, 
De Pauw University, 
Indiana State University, 
Butler University, 
Purdue University, 
Hanover College, 
Wabash College, 
Albion College, 
University of Michigan, 
University of Wisconsin, 
Beloit College, 
Northwestern University, 
Illinois Wesleyan, 
University of Kansas, 
University of Nebraska, 
University of California, 
Lehigh University, 
University of Minnesota, 
Mississippi. 



Alumni Chapters. 

Chicago, Indianapolis, 

Columbus, Kansas City, Cincinnati. 

La Fayette, St. Paul. 



48 



Qmegh Chhpter 



Sinnin CI\i.) 



Chartered June 23, 1869. 



Status in (Ur6e. 



Merritt C. Bragdon, A.M., M.D. 

Frank M. Brewer, M.D. 

Frederick D. Raymond, A.M. 

Frank A. Fletcher, 

Edward H. Webster, A.M., M.D. 

George P. Merrick. 

Edwin L. Shuman. 

Frederick D. Hesler, M.D., U.S.N. 



James E. Deering. 
Frank M. Elliot. 
George Lunt. 
Henry A. Pearsons, A.M. 
Charles A. Wightman. 
Giles Hubbard. 
Dexter P. Donalson. 
Henry Caddock. 



Srafree in Sacuffafe. 

CHICAGO MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

E. Wyllys Andrews, A.M., M.D. Frank T. Andrews, A.M., M.D. 

Nathan Smith Davis, Jr., A.M., M.D. 

Stafree in QJnitjereifafe. 

COLLEGE OF THEOLOGY. 

John F. Porter. 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 



Everett H. Eddy 



Elmer A. Pierce. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 



Seniors. 
Benjamin L. McFadden, 
Burr M. Weeden, 
Otis McG. Howard, 
Chas. B. Wright. 

Sophomcres. 
Frederick B. Cozzens, 
Wm. T. Alden, 
Alfred H. Phelps, 



Juniors. 
R. Roy Shuman, 
Jesse J. Shuman, 
Wm. C. Wise. 

Freshmen. 
Myron H. Hunt, 
Chas. T. Watrous, 
Wm. C. Van Benschoten, 
John J. Nutt, 
Edmund Ludlow, 
George P. Hills. 



49 



Merritt C. Bragdon, 



Alumni Members. 

Class of '70. 
Albert D. Langworthy, 



Frederick C. Winslow 



Class of 



71. 



Hamilton S. Wicks, 



George L. Vaple. 



Class of '72. 

Ellery H. Beal, George E. Bragdon, 

Lorin C. Collins, Ectinge Elmore, 

Edwin J. Harrison, George Lunt, 

Frederick D. Raymond, James F. Robinson, 
Henry A. Pearsons, 



James G. Burke, 
*John S. Hancock, 

Clarence R. Paul, 
I William H. Sparling, 



f James C. Bigelow, 
fWalter E. Haskin, 
-j-George P. Newman, 



♦Evarts G. Boutelle, 
Albert S. Hough, 



Class of '73. 

fjohn S. Condell, Jr., 
♦Frank E. Hesler, 
f Charles Trumbull. 

Class of '74. 

Chester T. Drake, 
William M. Knox, 



Henry A. Cooper, 
f Lee Kline, 



♦Fennimore E. Hancock, 
Daniel C. Riehl. 



f Charles L. Draper, 
Isaac E. Lambert, 



Class of '75. 

John H. Hamline, 
f James S. Norris, 
Frank M. Harris. 



Charles A. Ilgenfritz, 
Edward H. Webster, 



Alanson S. Appleton, 
Fred M. Taylor, 



Class of '76. 

Theophilus B. Hilton, 
Charles P. Wheeler. 



Winfield S. Matthew, 



•{•William H. Baker, 

Frank M. Elliott, 
•{•Morrison M. Gillett, 
f Joseph E. Martin. 



Class of '77. 

Albert D. Early, 
William G. Evans, 

♦Robert M. Humphrey. 

♦Ezra B. Parrish, 
Luther A. Norland. 



f Frank A. Early, 
f Henry Frank, 
Frank E. Knappen, 
fEdward S. Moss, 



E. Wyllys Andrews, 



Class of '78. 

William M. Booth, 
Wm. H. Harris. 



William L. Demorest. 



Dexter P. Donelson, 



Class of '79. 

fEdward McWilliams, 
Edward L. Stewart. 



' I )■ eased. 

1 Did not receive a degi ee 



50 



James W. McWilliams, 



Class of '80. 

*W. L. Brown, fjohn F. Dale, Nathan S. Davis, Jr., 

flames E. Deering, f Charles D. Etnyre, Charles A. Foulks, 

Robert B. Jessup, Jr.. fjohn E. Lipps, f Henry A. Smith. 

Class of '81. 

Frank T. Andrews, fjohn W. Burnett, Raymond V. DeGroff, 

f Edward D. Etnyre, *Frederick W. Randolph. 

Class of '82. 
fFrederick A. Hesler. f Charles H. Owen. 

Class of '83. 
f Mason Bross, *Harry P. Brown, f Edwin R. Elliott. 

Class of '84. 
Albert D. Currier, George P. Merrick, f George D. Tunnicliff. 

Class of '85. 

fFrederick B. Kampf, f Harry L. Peck, Charles S. Slichter, 

Sidney Watson, Charles A. Wightman. 

Class of '85. 

f Frank M. Brewer, fDavid E. Crozier f Hamlin C. Eddy, 

f Harry Lathrop, Henry L. Kindig, f William S. Prime. 

Class of '87. 

f Charles L. Clapp, f Frank N. Clark, Edwin L. Shuman, 

Ruter W. Springer, Herbert P. Wright, Giles Hubbard. 

Class of '88. 
Henry Caddock, Frederick J. Tourtellotte. 

Class of '8g. 
fRoberto R. Edgar, f Robt. H. Harvey. 

Class of 'go. 
f H. E. Adams, f William Jeffrey, f E. L. Andrews. L. D. Wallace. 



*Deceased. 

tDid not receive a desrree. 



51 



o F^flTEl^^ITY OF o 



Beta Treta Pi 



Founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, July, 1839. 



C01i0f?S: PI^K AND BliOl 



Active Chapter Roll. 



Amherst, 

Brown, 

Boston, 

Bethany, 

Beloit, 

Columbia, 

Cornell, 

Centre, 

Cumberland, 

California, 

Dickinson, 

Denison, 

De Pauw, 

Denver, 

Harvard, 

Hampden-Sidney, 

Hanover, 



Indiana, 

Iowa State, 

Iowa Wesleyan, 

Johns Hopkins, 

Kenyon, 

Knox, 

Kansas, 

Maine State, 

Mississippi, 

Miami, 

Michigan, 

Madison, 

Northwestern, 

Nebraska, 

Ohio, 

Ohio Wesleyan, 

Ohio State, 



Pennsylvania State, 

Randolph-Macon, 

Richmond, 

Stevens, 

St. Lawrence, 

Texas, 

Un. of Pennsylvania 

Union, 

Virginia, 

Vanderbilt, 

Western Reserve, 

Wittenburg, 

Washington-Jefferson,. 

Wabash, 

Westminster, 

Wooster, 

Wisconsin. 



Boston, 
Baltimore, 
Chicago, 
Cincinnati, 



Alumni Chapters. 



Cleveland, 
Denver, 
Indianapolis, 
New York, 
Wheeling. 



Providence, 
Richmond, 
San Francisco, 
St. Paul, 



52 



Rho O hkf>ter 

(36eta Tbcta Jpi.; 



Founded July 30, 1873. 



Fratres in U rDe « 

Rev. F. H. Clatworthy, William A. Hamilton, 

Darwin H. Cheney, I. R. Hitt, 

George A. Foster, Frank E. Lord, 

Joseph B. Hubbard, Charles G. Lewis, 

Rev. Chas. H. Zimmerman. 



£ratres in facilitate. 

Prof. J. H. Long, Prof. W. W. Jaggard. 

fratres in |Xnii?ersitate. 

COLLEGE OF THEOLOGY, 

Horace K. Vernon, '90, Harvey R. Calkins, '90. 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

Bond Stowe, '89, Edward F. Edgerly, '89, Arthur R. Edwards, '91. 

COLLEGE OF LAW. 

John E. Hunt, '90, John Montgomery, '89. 

Seniors. 
Harvey Brown, Philip R. Shumway, 

Herbert F. Briggs, Frank C. Whitehead. 

Juniors. 
Wm. D. Barnes, John B. Young. 

Sophomores . 

John P. Adams, Charles M. Starkweather, Henry M. Echlin, 

Fred M. Tisdel, Ward B. Sawyer. 

Freshmen. 
Ernest B. Hoag, Charles A. Phillips, 

Thomas H. Lewis, Jerome H. Raymond. 

53 



Alumni Members. 

Class of '74. 
Henry S. Boutell. Irving N. Guest, Darwin H. Cheney, 

Joseph M. Hawkes, Thomas J. Zeigler, Richard G. Hobbf. 

Class of 75. 
Cortez J. Goodenow, Frances M. Warrington, 

*Louis P. Scoville, James F. Stout. 

Class of '76. 
Andrew W. McPherson, *William T. Smith, Frank H. Scott. 

Class of '77. 

Oliver P. McCool, Deloso M. Tompkins, William W. Carr, 

Frank J. Irwin, Charles W. Thornton, Arthur S. Kimball, *Frank D. Sheets. 

Class of '78. 
Edward M. Kinman, George L. Ackerman, 

fCyrus F. Kryder, *Nathaniel J. Deisher. 

Class of '7g. 

James T. Musgrove, Isaac E. Adams, William H. Waite, Moses S. Cross, 

William T. Hobart, William A. Hamilton, Thomas H. Hood. 

Class of '80. 

William B. Norton. 

Class of '81. 

Frank H. Thatcher, George A. Foster, Arthur H. Briggs. 

Class of '82. 

Frederick H. Sheets, fWilliam F. Carroll, Alvah G. Briggs, Henry H. Miller. 

Class of '83. 
John C. Bannister, Charles H. Sharer, Prank E. Lord, James T. Hatfield. 

Class of '84. 

*Orange H. Cessna, *Elisha M. Stevens, *E. P. Vandercook. 

Class of '85. 

David H. Bloom, *John P. McWilliams, Samuel L. Boddy, 

William D. Fullerton, Edward D. Huxford, Joseph B. Hubbard. 

Class of '86. 

Clinton S. Tomlinson, *Samuel R. Slaymaker, 

*Elbert R. Tillinghast, ^William E. Davidson. 

Class of '87. 
*Harry Hamill, *Cassius M. Weedman, *Louis Rich, *Henry R. Hatfield, 

Charles G. Lewis, Charles N. Zeublen, Bond Stowe, *George B. Deem. 

Class of '88. 
Harvey R. Calkins, John E. Hunt, Edmund C. Quereau, Arthur R. Edwards. 

Class of '89. Class of '90. Class of '91. 

*Clark J. Tisdel. *James Robertson. *Harry Sackett. 



' I > i 1 1 not receive a degree. 

• 1 1. . 1 



54 



1% 



"Kappa 1?zi. g\ 



Founded at Jefferson College, Pennsylvania, 1852. 



COIiORS : PIfiK AND liRVHflDER. 



Active Chapter Roll. 



Pa 


A, 


Pa. 


B, 


Pa. 


r, 


Pa.£\ 


Pa 


z, 


Pa 


H, 


Pa 


9, 


Pa. 7, 


X. 


V. A, 


Pa 


K, 


X. 


V. B, 


X. 


Y.A, 


X. 


V. E. 


Va 


■ A, 


Va 


. B. 


Va 


. r. 


Md. A. 


D. 


C. A, 


S. 


C. A, 


Miss. 4, 



FIRST DISTRICT. 

Washington and Jefferson Coll., 
Allegheny College, 
Bucknell College. 
Pennsylvania College, 
Dickinson College, 
Franklin and Marshall College, 
Lafayette College, 
University of Pennsylvania, 
Cornell University, 
Swarthmore College, 
Syracuse University, 
Hobart College, 
Madison University, 

SECOND DISTRICT. 

University of Virginia, 
Washington and Lee College, 
Hampden-Sidney College, 
Johns Hopkins L niversity, 
Columbian College, 
South Carolina College, 
L'niversity of Mississippi, 



Washington, Pa. 
Meadville, Pa. 
Lewisburg, Pa. 
Gettysburg, Pa. 
Carlisle, Pa. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Easton, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ithaca, X. V. 
Swarthmore, Pa. 
Syracuse, N. V. 
Geneva, N. V. 
Hamilton, N. Y. 



Charlottesville, Va. 
Lexington, Va. 
Prince Edward Co.,Va. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Washington, D. C. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Oxford, Miss. 



55 



THIRD DISTRICT. 



Ohio •/, 


Ohio Wesleyan University, 


Delaware, 0. 


Ohio By 


Wittenberg College, 


Springfield, < >. 


Ohio r, 


Wooster University, 


Wooster, 0. 


Ohio A, 


University of Ohio, 


Columbia. 0. 


Ind. A, 


De Pauw University, 


Greencastle, End. 


Ind. B, 


University of Indiana, 


Bloomington, [nd. 


ind. r, 


Wabash College, 

FOURTH DISTRICT. 


Crawfordsville, Ind. 


111. -4, 


Northwestern University, 


Evanston, 111. 


Mich. ^4, 


University of Michigan, 


Ann Arbor, Mich. 


Wis. .4, 


University of Wisconsin, 


Madison, Wis. 


wis. r, 


•Beloit College, 


Beloit, Wis. 


la. A, 


University of Iowa, 


Iowa City, la. 


la. 27, 


Cornell College, 


Mt. Vernon, la. 


la. J, 


Simpson College, 


Indianola, la. 


Minn. B, 


University of Minnesota, 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Kan. ^4, 


University of Kansas, 


Lawrence, Kan. 


Cal. A, 


University of Pacific, 


San Jose, Cal. 



Alumni Chapters. 

Cleveland, Indianapolis, 

Chicago, Cincinnati, 

Washington, Wheeling. 




56 



Illinois H^-phh, 

(pbf Ikappa f»si.) 



Established 1864. 



Fratres in Urbe. 

Geo. A. Bass, Ph.B. Perkins B. Bass, A.B. George Baker, A.B. 

Charles K. Bannister, A.M., William C. Comstock, A.B., 

William M. Raymond, A.M., Charles M. Stuart, A.M., B.D. 

pratres in facilitate. 

Robert Baird, A.M., George H. Horswell. Ph.D., 

Chair of Greek. Instructor in Latin and German. 

Robert D. Sheppard, D.D., 

Chair of History and Political Economy. 
Charles Horswell, A.M., B.D., 

Instructor in Greek and Heorerc, G. B. I. 

Charles W. Pearson, A.M., Charles B. Thwing, A.B., 

Chair of English Literature. Instructor in Physics . 

^ratres in < U r, h 3ers ft: a 't e » 
COLLEGE OF THEOLOGY. 

Edwin A. Schell, A.B., '89, E. S. Ninde, A.B., '89. W. I. Taylor, '90. 

CHICAGO MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

Frank J. Campbell, Ph.B., '90. 

COLLEGE OF LAW. 

Charles H. Booth, Ph.B., '90, Charles E. Piper, A.B., '90, 

William H. Tuttle, A.B., '90. John V. Streed, '90. 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

Seniors. juniors. 

Charles P. Abbey, Frank A. Alabaster, 

George W. Dixon, James P. Grier, 

Charles S. Grayes, Wirt C Humphrey, 

Stephen J. Herben, George W. Springer. 
Samuel Weir. 

Sophomores. Freshmen. 

Walter A. Dempsey, John Louis Alabaster, 

Alfred H. Henry, Thomas J. Dixon, 

Stewart A. Maltman, George E. Fawcett, 

Thomas C. Moulding. Daniel W. Terry, 

Elias W. Ward. 



College of Liberal Arts— Continued. 



Alumni Members. 



G. E. Strobridge, 
*M. A. Pingre, 



Charles C. Bragdon, 
D. C. Elbert, 
A. E. Lyford, 



W. C. Comstock, 
R. D. Sheppard, 



Class of '64. 

Wm. H. Morrison, 
S. B. Raymond, 

Class of '65. 

15. F. Elbert, 
A. D. Foster, 
E. B. Wheeler, 

Class of '66. 
James Frake. 

Class of '67. 

John Ellis, 
Morton Culver, 



Charles K. Officld 

M. < . Springer. 



D. B. Butler, 
W. C. Gray, 
Lucas Nebeker. 



J. B. McGuffin, 
T. R. Strobridge. 



E. W. Burke, 



*A. J. Kennicott, 
A. B. Bishop, 
Willis Butterfield, 
Smith Coggeshall, 
Henry T. Scovill, 



Class of '68. 

Class of '69. 

N. M. Raymond, 
Theodore Jeroloman, 
J. E. Martin, 
T. D. Root. 
E. J. Smith. 



C. C. Snyder. 



C. K. Bannister, 
C. G. Root, 
Robert Baird, 
Karl Schow, 
T. C. Winslow. 



Samuel Burdock, 
B. F. Weston, 



Class of '70. 



F. C. Grannis, 
B. F. Winder, 



Ff. T. In graham, 
W. H. H. Adams. 



L. P. Davis, 



E. L. Parks, 
E. C. Arnold, 



Class of '71. 
C. W. Pearson. 

Class of '72. 

Class of '73. 

F. M. Husted, 
A. H. Needham. 

Class of '78. 



V. F. Brown, 



Louis Karcher. 



Chauncey Gaines, 



C. L. Root. 



Class of '79. 
G. H. Horswell. 



58 



\Y. H. Jordan, 



J. A. Fisher, 
*Carl Moelmann, 
\V. G. Clark, 



Class of '80. 
J. H. Pryor. 

Class of 81. 
\V. H. Lacy, J. P. Brushingham. J. A. Matlack. 



Class of '82. 

C. E. Piper, 
J. D. Harvey, 

Wesley Bradford. 



>R. W. Temple. 
F. M. Merrell, 



A. R. Solenberger, 

fE. J. James, 



Class of '83. 

W. E. Wilkinson, C. M. Stuart, 

Bishop W. X. Ninde. 



Class of '84. 
J. N. Hall, DeWitt Clinton, Charles Horswel 

Class of 85. 
Rush McNair, fC. O. Graves, 

Class of '86. 

S. P. Edmondson, 
J. X. James, 



W. H. Crawford. 



E. A. Schell 
G. F. James 



A. C. Axtell, 

*E. S. Ninde, 

W. S. Hall. 

C. B. Thwing, 
C. H. Booth, 
f\Y. A. Hall, 
C. S. Thorns, 



fN. A. Lyman, 



Class of '87. 

W. E. McLennan, 
*W. M. Humphreys, 

Class of "88. 

*J. W. Hanson, 
fj. W. Cleveland, 

G. A. Bass, 

G. L. Conley. 

Class of '89. 
fF. H. Blodgett, 



fj. J. Archer, 
fC. H. Buck, 



Class of 'go. 
Class of '91. 



G. C. Mars. 



J. H. Hill, 
L. O. Perlei 



F. J. Campbell, 
Wilber J. Andrews. 



W. H. Tuttle, 
Frank Little, 
P. B. Bass, 



f-A. E. Mabie. 

fCarl Bushnell. 
fR. O. Evans. 



•Deceased. 

tDid not receive a degree. 



.V.I 




> 



£)elta Upsilon. 



f3" 



Founded at Williams College, 1834. 




(|olors : Blue and gold. 





Active Chapter Roll. 




Williams, 


Union, 


Hamilton, 


Amherst, 


Adelberr, 


Colby, 


Rochester, 


Middlebury, 


Rutgers, 


Brown, 


Madison, 


New York, 


Cornell, 


Marietta, 


Syracuse. 


Michigan, 


Northwestern, 


Harvard, 


Wisconsin, 


La Fayette, 


Columbia, 


Lehigh, 


Tufts, 
Pennsylvania. 


De Pauw, 



Alumni Chapters. 

New York, Cleveland, Rhode Island, Rochester, 

Chicago, New England, Minneapolis. 



NORTHWESTERN CHAPTER, 



Established February 18, 1889. 



Fratres in Urbe. 



Nathan C. Miller, Ph.B., 
Leonard L. Skelton, A.B. 



Frank G. Reynolds, 
Frank G. Middlekauff, B.S. 



£ratres in facilitate. 

Walter Hough, Professor of Astronomy, and Director of Dearborn Observatory 

^ratres in |X n i vers H ; ate. 

COLLEGE OF THEOLOGY. 

Hugh D. Atchison, A.B., Geo. I. Larash, A.B. 



COLLEGE OF ORATORY. 

Eugene E. McDermott. 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 
Leonard Skelton, A.B. 

COLLEGE OF LAW. 
Oscar Middlekauff, Ph.B. 



COLLEGE OF 

Seniors. 
Forrest W. Beers, 
Herbert G. Leonard, 
Arthur E. Elmore, 

GUSTAV W. KUNSTMAN, 

Samuel S. Farley, 
John Q. Adams. 

Juniors. 
William A. Burch, 
Chas. M. Denny, 
Fred. C. Demorest, 
William R. Parkes, 
James F. Clancy, 

ROBT. H. HOLDEN, 

Joseph H. Odgers, 
Elvin E. Scott, 



LIBERAL ARTS. 

Sophomores. 
John H. Haggerty, 
Albert S. Mas* »n, 
Ray C. Harker, 

ERMAN J. RlDGWAY, 

William B. Walrath. 

Freshmen. 
Alfred W. Burton, 
Jas. S. Graham, 
Edward H. McMasters 
Hart R. Sweeny. 
William Doble, 
William P. Drew, 
Geo. L. Sackett, 
Edward H. Webb. 



John Clarke Butcher 
Nathan C. Miller, 



Walter A. Evans, 



H. Olin Cady, 



Wilbur T. Atchison, 
fNimrod F. Jenkins, 



Alumni Members. 

Class of '8 1. 
William R. Chamberlain, 
Frederick Porter, 

Class of '82. 
Nathan J. Harkness, Peter D. Middlekauff, 

Class of '83. 
f Arthur C. Smith, 

Class of '84. 
Leon E. Bell, 
Charles G. Plummer, 



Joseph M. Cormack. 
Polemus H. Swift, 



Robert H. Pooley. 



Alfred E. Hills. 

f James A. Clark, 
fCharles L. Rhodes. 



Owen W. Battey, 
Eugene E. McDermott, 



Hugh D. Atchison, 
George I. Larash, 



Columbus Bradford, 
Oscar Middlekauff, 



Class of '85. 
Frank Cook, 
fWalter B. McOwen, 
Leonard L. Skelton. 

Class of '86. 
Robert I. Fleming. 
Class of '87. 
Charles H. Brand, 
fBenton Middlekauff, 
fEdward L. Minard. 

Class of '88. 
f Alfred F. Clark, 
Arthur Pattison, 



f William H. Foster, 
fGeorge F. Reynolds, 



fHarvey A. Harding. 
Frank G. Middlekaurt. 



Chas. E. Linebarger, 
*f Frank W. Powell. 



♦Deceased. 

tDid not receive a degree. 



61 



*SL 



Phi Delta Theta 



Founded at Miami University. Oxford, Ohio, 1848. 



(Jolo«*s : 7t r 2 en * and J^^ure. 



Active Chapter Roll. 



Dartmouth College, 
-Cornell University, 
Syracuse University, 
Allegheny College, 
Williams College, 
Columbia College, 
Washington and Jefferson College. 
Roanoke College, 
Virginia Military Institute, 
University of Virginia, 
Washington and Lee University, 
University of Georgia, 
University of the South, 
University of Mississippi. 
Emory College, 
University of Alabama, 
University of Michigan, 
University of Texas, 
Buchtel College, 
Ohio Wesleyan University, 
Ohio State University, 
Indiana University, 
Hanover College, 



University of Vermont, 

College of the City of New York, 

Pennsylvania College, 

Colby University, 

Union University, 

Lafayette College, 

Dickinson College, 

Randolph-Macon College, 

University of North Carolina 

Richmond College, 

South Carolina College, 

Mercer University, 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 

Southwestern University, 

Vanderbilt University, 

Miami University, 

Southern University, 

Ohio University, 

Centre College, 

University of Wooster, 

Central University, 

Butler University, 

State College of Michigan, 



<>2 



Wabash College, 
De Pauw University, 
Northwestern University, 
University of Wisconsin, 
Lombard University, 
Iowa Wesleyan University, 
University of Nebraska, 
Iowa State University, 
University of Pennsylvania, 

Amherst 



Franklin College, 
Hillsdale College, 
Illinois Wesleyan University, 
Knox College, 
University of Missouri, 
University of Minnesota, 
Westminster College, 
University of Kansas, 
University of California, 
College. 



Alumni Chapter Roll. 



New York, N. Y., 
Washington, D. C, 
Nashville, Tenn., 
Cincinnati, O., 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Galesburg, 111., 



Pittsburg, Pa., 
Richmond, Va., 
Atlanta, Ga., 
Louisville, Ky., 
Indianapolis, Ind., 
Kansas City, Mo., 



Baltimore, Md., 
Columbus, Ga., 
Montgomery, Ala., 
Akron, O., 
Franklin, Ind., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



G> 



(Phi Bclta ^heto.) 



Established at Northwestern University, February is, 1859. 



fratres in |Jrbe. 



William S. Harbert, 
William R. Page, 
N. G. Iglehart, 
I. R. Hitt, Jr., 



Curtis S. Remy 
O. C. Foster, 
H. M. Kidder, 
C. M. Carr, 



Fratres in Uniuersitate. 

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY. 

Frank Moore, A.B., '89, Frank P. G. Sherman, '90. 

COLLEGE OF LAW. 

Samuel D. Townsend, '89, Jacob H. Hopkins, '89. 



03 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 
Frank Collet Jones, '89, 1 E. Palm 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS. 

yunior . 



Settlor. 
H. R. Howell. 



Marshall P. Noyes, 
Ralph D. Harris, 



George O. Bai 
Frederic J. Farrell. 

Freshmen. 
George E. Nevvcomb, Charles K. Sherman, 

Frederick W. Belknap, Mills F. Clark. 

In Preparatory. 



John A. Rogers, Pail I. Davis. 

Alumni Members. 

Class of '59. 



George W. Beggs, 

W. A. Lord, 

W. H. H. Raleigh, 



F. D. Brown, 



B. B. Botsford, 



Class of '60. 

Class of '61. 
G. L. Cook, 

Class of '62. 



H. M. Kidder, 

H. A. Plympton, 
H. L. Luch Stewart. 



J. W. Haney. 



I. C. Foster, 



W. R. Page, 



C. H. Simpson, 

Class of '63. 
F. A. Parker. 



C. E. Smith. 



Class of '88. 
I. R. Hitt, Jr. 



Class of '89. 
fF. C. Waugh, fE. B. Green, fG. B. Parker. 

Class of '90. 
fW. A. Clark, fH. L. Hanley, fC. M. Carr. 

Class of '91. 
fS. J. Sutton, fB. C. Buxton, fD. F. Greene, fJ- D - Spaulding. 




Deceased. 
1Did not receive a degree. 



64 




- 






■Q^-'^ 



Slphh Phi. ® 



■-~m^ 



Founded at Syracuse University. Syracuse. New York. 1872 



COLiORS : BORDEAUX AND SILiVER GRAY. 



Roll of Chapters. 

Alpha, Syracuse University, '72. 

Beta. Northwestern University. "Si. 
Eta. Boston University. '83. 

Gamma. De Pauw University. '87. 

Delta, Cornell University. '89. 

(9 " ™~ - — - Q) 

Beth C hhf>ter - 

Alpha ?3fu- 



Established May, 1SS1. 



Sorores in Urbe. 

Frances E. YVillard, Mary E. Henry. '85, 

Harriet Towle, '87, Lizzie Hill Leek. '87 

Frances Towle. 87, Anna Towle, '87, 

Helen Pearsons. 

gorores in f acultate. 

Rena A. Michaels, 
Dean of Woman's College, and Prof essor of the Fren: : : L 
Catharine Beal, Director in Art DepartnuMt. 

gorores in Uniuersitate. 

Seniors. 
Stella Bass, Elizabeth B. Edwards, Blanche Caraway 

Grace I. Fostfr, Frances E. Hubbell, Minnie Jones. 

65 



Mabel C. Barneti e 

Mary Mai.tman, 
Minnie R. Terry, 

Fanmk Alabaster, 



"Junior. 

Nellie E. Stewart. 

Sopliomores. 

May l. Bennett, 

[DA T. Si a\ i.i . 
Gertrude Simmons, 

Freshmen. 
Alice Gray, 



Olive Finley, 

Anna E. ROBl 

Mak'iha Smith. 
May Demoi 



Harriet Thompson, 



Helen M. Lloyd. 



Alumnse Members, 

Class of '81. 
Emma James, nee Mesure, Jennie Cormack, nee Marshall. 

Class of '83. 
Minnie Goodsmith, nee Moulding, *fEva Lane, fClaire Lattin. 

Class of '84. 
f Anna Gloss, Delia G. Maltbie. 

Class of '85. 
f Anna Ames, nee Sawyer, f Jennie Crawford, nee Foote, 

f Lizzie Hayward, nee Stevens, Ella M. Bloom, nee Sawyer, 

fMyrtie Spenser, nee Goodwin, Mary Wilkinson, nee Swail, 

Mary Henry, f Jessie King, Mary E. Moore, f Henrietta Thornton. 

Class of '86. 
f Ellen Gammon, f Addie Hovey, Ada M. Peart. 

Class of '87. 

fRosa Knox, nee Bead, fCora Clark, Henrietta Coon, Mary E. David, 
fCarrie Hamill, nee Calkins, f Martha King, nee Shabacker, Lizzie Leek, nee Hill, 

Helena B. Pierson, f Addie Richards, nee Haney, 

Anna C. Towle, Frances S. Towle, f Harriett N. Towle, Albertine C. Wales. 



Class of '88. 

Cora Allen, f Lila McLennan, nee Keeley, 

Helen Pearsons, Mary Sumner, 

■[Elizabeth W. Moulding. 

Class of '90. 

fBertha Call. 



Class of '91. 

•f-Ethel Eddy, fEdith Wyman. 



Mary Middlekauff, 
fAnnie M. Swift. 



tDid not receive a degree. 
'Deceased. 



66 



* 



J3el*ta QajvI|V[R. 



Founded at Oxford, Miss, 1872. 



COLORS: BRONZE, PINK AND BLUE. 



Active Chapter Roll. 



Eta, 


Buchtel College, 


Chi, 


Cornell University, 


Omega, 


Wisconsin State University, 


XL 


Michigan State, 


Lambda, 


Minnesota State, 


Phi, 


Colorado State, 


Sigma, 


Northwestern University, 


Tau, 


Iowa State, 


Delta, 


Univ. of Southern California, 


Zeta, 


Albion College, 



Alpha. Mt. Union College, 



@ 



Kappa, Univ. of Nebraska. 



Alumni Chapter. 

Theta, Adelbert. 



6) 



gttgma (&\}txvtev+ 



(Setta (Bamma.) 



Established March, 1882. 



Sorores in |Xrbe. 



Elizabeth R. Hunt, '77, 
Harriet A. Kimball, '83, 
Helen Redfield Horswell, '84, 
t Alida G. White, '85, 

-f-KATHERINE E. REDFIELD, '87, 



Alice D. Cummings, 
Anna L. Crandon, '83, 
Leila M. Crandon, '84, 
f Mary Gage Hall, '86, 
fLouiSE E. Whitehead, '90, 



Katherine Allen, University of Wisconsin, '87. 

Sorores in {Jnittersitate. 

Senior, Sophomores, 

Mary C. Richey, Helen H. Bock, 

Louise E. Rice, 



Juniors. 
Aurora Thompson Fisk, 
Mabel L. Sheldon, 
Louise E. Swan. 



Freshmen. 
Helen Babcock, 
Harriet Butler, 
Lena Golder, 
Can dace Richey, 



67 



Alumnse Members. 



Class of '82. 
Ella May Tarr, 
•"■Sarah Excene White. 



Class of '83. 
Annie Lyon Crandon. 



Class of '84. 

*Mary Ann Bennett, Minnie E. Jones, 

Leila Moss Crandon, Nellie M. Horswell, nee Redfield, 

Mary Ann Sheets, nee Hill, -{-Catharine B. Long, nee Stoneman. 

Class of '85. 

•f-Millicent Bond Bingham, 

f Minnie Flaxilla McPherrin, nee Haw, 

f Alida Griggs White. 

Class of '86. 
f Mary Lois Hall, nee Gage. 

Class of '87. 
f Rose May Birch, f Mary Thrace Hormel, nee Bonnifield, f Jessie Bruce, 

Josie Bentley Nash, nee Crandon, Camilla Blanche Ferris, 

f Elsie May Irvine, f Adele Kretsinger, f Edith Simpson Norton, f Claribel Parr. 

Class of '88. 
fCora Belle Carhart, fHattie T. Haw, Carolina Louise Hunt. 

Class of '89. Class of '90. Class of '91. 

•(•Lizzie Brooks Bonnifield. Louise E. Whitehead. f Emma Johnson.. 




*Deceased. 

tDid not receive a degree. 




I A. Lowell 2. Co 



^fi #4 2* 

® pPPft I^ftppfl Gfliip. ® 

O— ^^/1^^-g^^o-— ~^~~0 

Founded at Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois, 1870. 



COLORS: LIGHT BLUE AND DARK BLUE. 



Active Chapter Roll. 

ALPHA PROVINCE. 

#, Boston, B, St. Lawrence, 

T, Syracuse, W, Cornell, 

A, Buchtel, r, Wooster, 

P, Allegheny, N, Ohio State. 

BETA PROVINCE. 

A, Indiana State. I, DePauw, 

M, Butler, K, Hillsdale, 

S f Adrian, H, Wisconsin State. 

GAMMA PROVINCE. 

E, Illinois Wesleyan, T, Northwestern, 

X, Minnesota State, O, Simpson Centenary, 

Z, Iowa State, £1, Kansas State, 

2, Nebraska State, ©, Missouri State. 



VJRSIL.ON Ql-IKRTeR, 

(Kappa Kappa Oiniitma.) 



gorores in |X r ^ e - 

Julia A. Ames, Maky E. Va\ Bl - HOT! n, '86 

Fannie Simpson, '84, Kate M. Alling, '87, 

{•Kate Simpson, '85, |K\im\ Thompson, '87, 

fMARY S. Morse, '86, Belle E. Alling, '88. 

Alice D. Webster, [Minnie Hamline, '88. 

gorores in {Jniversitate. 

Senior. 

Theresa Ludlow. 

Juniors. 

Amy Jarkett, Isabel R. Morse, Edith Clarke, Clara Tucker 

Freshmen. 

Florence Bucks, Fannie Mesner, Cora Blakeslee, Maude Smith, 

Bird E. Hewson, Jessie L. Wiley, Effie W. Miller. 

Alumnse Members. 

Class of '82. Class of '84- 

Lydia L. Jones. Frances Simpson. 

Class of '85. 

Katherine L. Sharp, f Anna Brown, nee Boyle, f Nellie Boddy, nee Wells, 

•{•Minnie L. Hixon, nee Scott, f Lucy Ferguson, nee Wood, f Grace Little, 
fNellie Little, fEmily Medary, nee Hale, f Kate Simpson. 

Class of >86. 

f Florence Fulton, f Jessie Houston, f Clara Klinefelter, 

fMary Morse, May Van Benschoten. 

Class of '87. 
Kate M. Alling, f Belle Austin, nee Merrill, 

Matilda P. Hutchison, f Grace L. Scrips. 

Class of >88. 

Belle E. Alling, f Minnie Hamline, fHelen Meyers, 

flda Rankins, nee Sunderland, f Emma Thompson. 

Class of '89. 

•{•Elizabeth M. Brown, f Frances Chick, 

f Carrie Gilchrist, nee Case. f Clara Thompson. 

Class of '90. 

f Ella Evans, fMary Haviland, f Jennie M. Jones, 

■{•Maud Towt, nee Kendall, f Nettie Shutterly, nee Rugg. 

Class of '9i> 

flda M. Simmons, {Agnes Thompson. 

i Did not receive a degree. 

70 



Founded at De Pauw University, Greencastle, Indiana, January 27, 1870. 



Colors: Black and Gold. 



* 



Active Chapter Roll. 



A, DePauw University, '70, 

B, Indiana State University, '70, 
A, Illinois Wesleyan Univ., '75, 
E. Wooster University, '75, 

6, Simpson Centenary, '79, 

7, Cornell University, '81, 
K, University of Kansas, '8 1, 
A, University of Vermont, '81, 



M, Allegheny College, '81, 

N, Hanover College, '82, 

0, Un. of So. California, '87, 

77, Albion College, '87, 

P, University of Nebraska, '87, 

2, University of Toronto, '87, 

T, Northwestern University, '87. 

F, University of Minnesota, '89. 






1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ife>- 



TAU CHAPTER 

(Kappa ^lpf\a ^Tl^eta.) 

) Established September 29, 1887. { — 



SO^OI^ES IN Unive^siuate. 

Junior. 

Eva R. Hall. 

Sophomores. 

Edith M. Garton, May Gloss, Lina Kennedy, 

Mary R. Knox, Marguerite Mulvane. 

Fresh men. 
Rose Berkey, Lulu Berkey, Minnie Church, 

Bessie Mars, Jennie Meredith, Lillian Prescott 

Alumnse Members. 

Mabelle Thatcher, '88, fAnna H. Adams, ' 



Mae H. Earl, '88 

fGrace C. Knapp, '91 



f Clara Shellabarger, '91. 



tDid not receive a degree. 



T1 



Gamma pbi J^eta. 



Founded at Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y., 1874, 



COLORS: SEAL BROWN AND FAWN. 



^g g^ 



HE Sorority of Gamma Phi Beta was founded at Syracuse 
University, November 11, 1874. The founders were the 
Misses Frances E. Haven, E. Addie Curtis, Helen M. 
Dodge and Minnie Bingham. 

Bishop E. O. Haven, then Chancellor of the Univer- 
sity, took great interest in the sorority, and suggested its open motto, 
" reQEjusXioojuevai k-itl 7tETpav.' n 

The Sorority grants charters only to colleges whose alumnae are 
admitted to the Western Association of Collegiate Alumnae. The 
conventions are held annually with each chapter, in the order of their 
establishment, the next convention being held with Epsilon, at North- 
western, November n, 1889. In spite of its conservatism, the Alpha 
chapter alone numbers over two hundred members. The Sorority 
admits no honorary members, and does not desire to extend its chap- 
ter roll beyond the number of six or seven. 



(9 



Roll of Chapters. 

Alpha, Syracuse, N. Y., '72, Gamma, Wisconsin State, '86, 

Beta, Michigan State, '82, Delta, Boston, '87, 

Epsilon, Northwestern, y 88. 

72 



EPSILON CHAPTER. 

((Bamma Phi 35 eta.) 



Sorores in Urbe. 

Honta B. Smalley, Alice M. Hosmer. 

gorores in IJniuersitate. 

Senior. 
Charlotte E. Lyford. 

Junior. 
Caroline Clifford. 

Sophomores. 
Mary B. Holderman, Livonia R. Kay, Helen G. Reed, Dilla Tibbles. 

Freshmen. 

Beulah Houston, Mary E. Patterson, Olive M. Foster, 

Pearl Farwell, Frances Butcher. 




73 




c 



onventions. 



Sigma Chi, 
Phi Kappa Psi, 
Beta Theta Pi. 



90, - 

( District Convention, April, '89, 
I Grand Arch Council, April, '90 



Delta Epsilon, 

Phi Delta Theta, 

Alpha Phi, 

Delta Gamma, 

Kappa Kappa Gamma, August, '90, 

Kappa Alpha Theta, '89, 

Gamma Phi Beta, - November, ' 



August, '89, 
October, '89, 
October, '89, 
October, '89, 
June, '89, 



Chicago. 

Madison, Wis. 

Chicago, 111. 

Wooglin-on-Chautauqua. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Bloomington, 111. 

Boston, Mass. 

Madison, Wis. 

Bloomington, 111. 

Lawrence, Kas. 

Evanston, 111. 




7 4 




College of law. 



®- 



I oft have heard him say how he admired 

Men of your large profession, that couid speak 

To every cause, and things mere contraries, 

Till they were hoarse again, yet all be law. — [Ben Johnso: 



FACULTY: 

JOSEPH CUMMINGS, D.D., LL.D., President. 

HON. HENRY BOOTH, LL.D., Dean. 

HON. HARVEY B. HURD. 

HON. MARSHALL D. EWELL, LL.D., M.D. 

HON. WILLIAM W. FARWELL. 

HON. NATHAN S. DAVIS, M.D., LL.D. 




75 



SENIOR CLHSS, 



Ahrens, Mrs. Mary A. 

Allen, William II. 

Ashworth, James J. 

Baca, Felix M. 

Bailey, William S. 

Ball, Jesse C. 

Benner, Adolph L. 

Boyle, Guy L. 

Brammer, Frederick H. 

Brooks, Francis R. 

Buell, Charles A. 

Burrows, Frederick M. 

Canning, Nevit S. 

•Carpenter, Grant. 

Clark, William D. 

Coglan, Henry D. 

Copley, IraC, B.A. (Yale) 

Cowles, Alfred, Jr., A.B. (Yale) 

Cunnea, William A. 

Curtis, Bertha E. 

Davidson, Delbert L. 

Davidson, George M. 

Doyle, Minerva A. 

Dresser, Frank E. 

Drezmal, Max A. 

Elley, John R. 

Eustace, Aloysius J., B.A. (St. Ignatius) 

Foss, George E., Jr., A.B. (Harvard) 

Francis, Charles R. 

Galloway, Samuel M. 

German, Charles W. 

Goodbody, Frank W. 

Hendricks, Thomas A. 

Hoglund, John H. 

Hopkins, Jacob H., B.S. (Knox) 

Hoyt, Frank W. 

Hughes, George F., A.B. (Lombard Univ 

Hurrel, Cyrus F. 

Ingalls, Henry A. 

Kasmar, Max L. 



Kreite, Edward C. 

Lawler, Joseph H. 

Lawton, William M. 

Loeb, Albert H. 

Lomax, Robert D. 

Lord, Benjamin W. 

Lowenthal, Solomon L. 

Marshall, Hugh A. 

McCormick, John. 

McKeever, John A. 

Meyer, F. J. Lewis. 

Meyering, Harry. 

Montgomery, J. R., A.B. (Beloit) B & IJ. 

Naramore, Milton G., M.A. (Butler) A T A. 

O'Connell, Frederick G. 

O'Neill, T. F., G.B. (Univ. Notre Dame) 

Ostereicher, Leopold M. 

Ohrenstein, Victor I. 

Petersen, Victor J. 

Pritchard, Elliott A. 

Root, J. Sherman. 

Root, John. 
*Sage, RufusA., A.B. (Chicago University) 

Sauter, Frederick V. 

Schwartz, John J. 

Schweyer, Wilberforce. 

Simms, Arthur H. 

Smith, William E. 

Stilwell, Charles C. 

Stockton, Charles W. 

Trude, Samuel H. 

Ullrich, Walter. 

Velde, F. L., A.B. (Univ. of Mich.) B & 77. 

Vermilyea, Samuel E. 

Wahl, Albert. 

Walter, Grove E. 
.) Wells, Hosea W. 

Wenban, A. C, Ph.M.(Lake Forest Univ.) 

Wheelock, William W. 

Wiedinger, George T. 



76 



J isforvj of ifass '$$. 




UR records are not without numerous interesting events. 
Our greatest regret is the limited space we have in which 
to present them in their fullest, most truthful light. We 
may be excused, perhaps, for laying stress upon a few 
of the most important acts and actors, to the neglect of 
those minor happenings which, in our humble estimation, play no part 
in the destiny of this remarkable class of '89. 

Leaders there have been, as there always are in any organization 
or band of workers. Eighty-nine's record has been a stormy one. 
On the one hand, an element consisting of independent men of prin- 
ciple, led by a philanthropist, whose humanity embraces a range that 
ought to make the career of John Bright pale with envy ; on the 
other, a band of political vultures, hungry to feast upon the spoils of 
class honors. Oh, vanitas vanitatum ! " ambition hath a grip of iron." 

Let us witness the passing scenes : 

Scene I. — Webster Literary Society, a chip off the old block ; a 
child conceived by '89, begat by one Wellington, has proved a lusty 
kid, though suckled in turn by such nurses as Hopkins, Copley, Ver- 
milyea and Wells, some of the above mentioned vultures. At each 
successive change of diet, it (we do not vouch for its sex) has been 
restored from an ominous attack of flatulent colic by such independ- 
ent sponsors and wet nurses as Ullrich, Swartz, Sauter and Wohl. 
Methinks its lacteal food hath been ambition. Ring down the cur- 
tain. 

Scene II. — The sky is beclouded — the plot thickens. Central 
thought, " Class presidency ; " main ambition, " How to get there." 
" The vultures must be squelched." A meeting of the class called 
December 12, '88. A man of noble mien, in whom we have no fear, — 
in fact, one whom we ad-Meier, — takes gavel in hand and commands 
silence. Hark ! how the vultures scream, " Why this meeting ?" " By 
whose authority?" A ballot finally results. It places honors untold, 
by a vote of twenty-eight out of sixty-five, upon a three months child 
of U. C. L. Verily this is good ! The vultures have screamed in 
vain. They wipe their bills as they bite the dust, spread their wings 

77 



and fly away. The janitor appears; the lights disappear. All go 
hence in quest of the flown birds. Ring down the curtain. 

Scene III. — The vultures have returned, but their capacioui 
crops are yet full (of dust), and no morsel, however dainty, will induce 
them to smooth their ruffled feathers and accept the proffered gifts. 
But no need of going begging, for there's Schweier to take the Vice- 
Presidency, and O'Connell, the Treasurership. The mighty council 
are troubled for a Secretary. One Coghlan is before them as pro 
tem. Sec, and the only candidate. One moves to make his nomina- 
tion unanimous. A disgruntled old vulture would amend by having 
the gentleman cast a unanimous vote for himself. Only the latter's 
modesty prevents. The "mighty man of valor" decides, notwith- 
standing a divided vote, that the council would have Mr. C's nomina- 
tion unanimous. Again the vultures wipe their bills and fly away. So 
do the other birds. Ring down the curtain. 

Scene IV. — The supremest hour has come. Former scenes pale 
into insignificance when compared to this. Mind the countenances ! 
Even the vultures are present, and ever and anon as they stroke their 
bills ; a look of anxiety betrays itself. Time, February 6, '89 ; place, 
"The old stamping ground ;" question of interest, " Who will be the 
speaker at Evanston ?" Eighty-nine is not alone ; her efforts are 
seconded by Ninety's noble sons and daughters. One of these sons, 
whose huge form towers above all the rest, and whose good nature is 
just as large, becomes acceptable to all this motley gathering of birds 
as their ruler for the hour. One of those omnivorous vultures 
becomes his scribe. Thus the carnival opens. Now begins the con- 
cert. Hark, how the praises of this one and that one are sung ! The 
songsters are heard in all their merry warbling, and loud and long is 
the chorus of twitters from those who listen and applaud. Only one 
poor old vulture "does well" at warbling, and his is a sickly carol for 
his mate, who hopes for much but expects little. 

The other bird, who feeds not upon the carrion of the secret 
society of a few, but who holds council publicly with all alike, has 
reason to feel secure in his flight to the summit of victory. Not until 
there is just cause for alarm does he awake to the fact that he has for- 
gotten to vote for himself, and then the king decrees " too late." 
Bitter the tears that have to be shed. The warbling ceases. The 
screaming of the vultures but now begins. And well may they scream 
when a division of the house by a vote of fifty-two to fifty-one, in their 
favor, is granted to the suspicious by the big-hearted king, to confirm 
a secret ballot. The victory so nearly lost to one, and so nearly won 
to the other, has been a fraud, undoubtedly ; but it is ever thus. 

78 



Scene V. — Excuse us. Ours is not a prophet's pen. 

Thus have we been long in saying little. With all our fun, to be 
serious, we shall look back with pleasure to the history of '89, and 
think of the variety of people and events who made it up. We may 
be pardoned for especially mentioning the three fair ones who have 
so bravely endured all the storms and trials bestowed by the wild 
youthful pranks of those who should be made of sterner stuff. No one 
but will think with pleasure of the kind, courteous, benign influence, 
possessed only by woman, bestowed by Mrs. Ahrens and Misses 
Doyle and Curtis. Joy be with them. 




JUNIOR CLHSS, 



Allen, Wm. W., B.S.(I11. Wesleyan Univ.) 

Baker, George W. 

Boggs, Franklin H. 

Bold, John D. T. 

Busse, Robert C. 

Carter, Howard M. 

Case, Daniel H. 

Cella, Angelo S. 

Clendening, Paul. 

Cody, Hope R., B.S. (N. W. College) 

Connell, Joseph A. 

Crosson, Marion E. 

Culver, Morton T. 

Davis, James W., B.S. (Normal School) 

Denison, Franklin A. 

Fearing, Lilien B. 

Finn, Nicholas R. 

French, Andrew. 

Gerber, Samuel N. 

Garnsey, John H. 

Grossberg, Jacob G. 

Hambleton, Earl L. 

Hawley,S. F. Ph.B. (Univ. of Mich.) A A # 

Hawley, Charles G. 

Hennessy, Mary G. 

Hinckley, William B. 

Holloway, G.F.,A.B. (Chicago Univ.) Z W 

Holmes, George B. 

Hunt, J. E., Ph.B. (N. W. Univ.) B & 77. 

Ingalls, Emerson. 

Jones, Alfred W. 

Keogh, Edward. 

King, Ralph W. 

Lee, James M., A.B. (University of Mich.) 

Lomax, Robert D. 

Loveless, Braman H. 



Mansfield, Harold H. 

McCabe, Michael J. 

McCallum, Walter C. 

McCue, John J. 

Middlekauff, O. Ph.B. (N. W. Univ.) A T. 

Mitchell, Dana A. 

Mitchell, G. R., A.B. (Univ. of Mich.) \ </< 

Murphy, Francis T. 

Newton, William W. 

Piper, C. E., A.M. (N. W. Univ) £ K W. 

Reed, George E. 

Ripley, Charles H. 

Roberts, Judson O. 

Ross, Alva. 

Ross, Walter W., A.B. (Princeton) 

Safford, William H. 

Severy, Ernest. 

Short, Benedict J. 

Shrimski, Israel. 

Simon, Matthias. 

Smith, B. M., B.S. (N. W. Normal School) 

Southwick, Isaac H. 

Stratton, A. B., Ph.B. (Wheaton College) 

Straight, L. A., A.B.(Ill.Wes'n Univ.) $AS 

Streed, John V. 

Steen, Frederick J. 

Synnestvedt, John B. 

Thomas, David R. 

Touhy, Edmund R. 

Turnock, James. 

Tuttle, W. H., A.B. (N. W. Univ.) $KW. 

Tyley, John R. 

Van Saun, Fred B. 

Whitfield, Joseph H. 

Winchester, Lucius W. 

Young, C. W., Ph.B. (Brown Univ.) Z W. 



so 




ffiecy '90. 




;NE February evening, 1955, two aged judges sat by an open 
fire-place and talked thusly : 

" Hawley, we two now are the sole survivors of that 
set of young men and ladies who, after the fall of 1888, 
for two successive years were hauled up four flights of 
stairs by a cranky elevator, never known to be running up, though 
every-day the poor, tired thing managed to creep to the top of the 
building, and then would jump down at a rate of speed calculated to 
make your hair stand on end. When the door at 40 Dearborn Street 
was opened, we could read many a sign ; but the fact that the U. C. L. 
did its noble work, there was too insignificant to be set forth." 

"Yes, Winchester," replied Hawley, "what a fine time we used 
to have singing the leaner elevator man to his utmost pitch of anger, 
and applauding our excellent professors. But, come to think of it, 
hasn't the class of '90 done splendid things, though ? You remember 
the famous year of 1900, when six men of our class were in the Illinois 
House of Representatives and four in the Senate, and how they all 
agreed to push through certain reforms! What a noble fight they made 
to destroy forever those two relics of barbarism, to-wit : distress for 
rent, and the grand jury. What stirring speeches were made ! How 
they did sit on the inquisitorial, exquisitional, ex parte grand jury until 
finally success crowned their efforts. Other states followed the 
example. And now our glorious republic of 150,000,000 inhabitants, 
by far the most powerful and enlightened nation on the face of the 
globe, never disgraces itself by allowing anyone anywhere to make 
distress for rent, or by permitting a grand jury to be in esse. 

" In 191 1, members of our class succeeded in causing to be passed 
a measure so amending the statutes that, in trials of cases, judges 
alone decide questions of law. A fellow now can lucubrate as long as 



81 



he wants to, and his lucubrations will not be set at naught by an igno 
rant jury." 

Then Winchester spoke : " Our class has had wonderful success. 
Three were the best lawyers in the country. One came within an ace 
of being President. We have had United States Senators ; nineteen 
entered State Legislatures; many of us were judges ; twenty-five became 
Justices of the Peace ; and, most wonderful of all, two worked harder 
to do some good in the world than to get rich. I tell you what is a 
fact. The mighty waters of Lake Michigan, beaten by the fierce 
northern gales, will discontinue angrily lashing its shores, and its blue 
bosom will cease to heave centuries before the influence of the class 
of '90 of the U. C. L., of Chicago, is no longer felt in the world." 
" Amen !" murmured Hawley, and then the two aged judges went to 
bed. 




82 



G^I^DS. 



Cr-s-x. 

•• A great man, I'll warrant, by the picking of his teeth." 
W-it-d. 

" There was once a little child, and he strolled about a good 
deal and thought a number of things." 

J-N-S. 

" Men would be saints if they loved God as they love women." 
Th-m-s. 

" At each step I feel my advanced head knock out a star in 
heaven." 
Fr-ing. 

•• And still the wonder grew, 
That one small head could carry all she knew." 
Gr-s-rg. 

" I am so fresh, the new green blades of grass 
Turn pale with envy as I pass." 
Sv-s-vx. 

" He hath a lean and hungry look." 

P-E-R-. 

" I have an exposition of sleep come upon me." 

G-L-V-. 

" Loud like a drum because of emptiness." 
Ul-ch. 

" What the devil art thou?" 

S-V-RY. 

" Like two gentlemen rolled into one." Several. 

T-TLE. 

" A scholar, a ripe and a good one." 

W-CH-R. 

" A perfect gentleman." 
De-ox. 

" Mislike me not for my complexion." 



Cl-N-ING. 

"joy ruled his day and Love his night." 

Y-NG. 

" Don't you understand it, Professor ? Well, wait until after 

class, and I'll explain." 

F-s. 

" I am in favor of the best man winning." 

L-w-l. 

" A witty, wild, inconstant, free gallant." 

K-M-R. 

" Balloon struck madness." 

C-t-ss. 

" A maiden modest and yet self-possessed." 

M-Y-R. 

"Vaulting ambition overleaps itself." 

Mrs. Ah-ns. 

" A learned lady famed." 

B-L-Y. 

" O, that this too solid flesh would melt, 
Thaw and resolve itself into a dew !" 
H-l-d. 

" And be these juggling friends no more believed 
That palter with us in a double sense, 
That keep the word of promise to our ear, 
And break it to our hope." 
Sc-w-tz. 

" Who can tell what the baby thinks ?" 

T-HY. 

" Go, some of you, and fetch a looking-glass." 

S-ER. 

" Mr. Wells doth well: 1 
St-r-t. 

" One may smile and smile 
And be a villain still." 

B-LD. 

" You are too hot." 

V-S-N. 

" Express thyself, and 'twill a riddle be." 
Sh-s-ki. 

" When the brisk minor pants for twenty-one.' 

84 



School of Ph-cy. 

" I counted two and seventy stenches 
All well denned, and several stinks." 

O-S-IN. 

" Ma, gimme a cent ; I want to be tough." 

Kh-GH. 

" How old are you, friend ?" 

St-x. 

" Eft sooner they heard a most melodious sound." 

Ty-ly. 

" To hear his girlish voice in laughter ring, 
But oh ! ye Gods, to hear him sing." 

Kr-te. 

" Who thinks too little and talks too much." 

H. A. I-ls. 

" A politician ; one that would circumvent God." 

R-BTS. 

" Who muttered, mumbling low 
As though his mouth were full of dough." 

E-L-Y. 

" Beneath his hat there lie deviltries and deceptions. 




85 



^vjjj ebster Uterary Society \ 






OFFICERS. 



J. W. DAVIS, 
I, L. WINCHESTER, 
WALTER ULLRICH, 
F. P. O'NEIL, 
HARVEY MEYERING, 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Marshal 



Programme Committee. 

L. A. Straight, J. Turnock, Walter Ullrich. 



W. W. Allen, 
F. H. Boggs, 
W. S. Bailey, 
F. H. B rammer, 
J. T. D. Bold, 
Geo. W. Baker, 
R. C. Busse, 
S. F. Hawley, 
N. S. Canning, 
Oscar Middlekauff, 

D. L. Davidson, 

L. M. Oestereicher, 

E. A. Pritchard, 

F. V. Sauter, 
W. Schweyer, 

G. E. Walter, 
W. E. Smith, 
G. R. Mitchell, 
W. H. Tuttle, 

J. E. Lee, 



Members. 

M. E. Crosson, 
N. R. Finn, 

C. R. Francis, 

F. W. Goodbody, 
J. G. Grossberg, 
T. A. Hendricks, 
J. H. Hoglund, 

D. H. Case, 

J. A. McKeever, 
M. A. Drezmal, 
M. O. Naramore, 
M. J. McCabe, 
J. O. Roberts. 
John S. Root, 
S. E. Vermilyea, 

G. T. Wiedinger, 

C. C. Stilwell, 

D. A. Mitchell, 
M. M. Simon, 

B. H. Loveless. 



E. Kriete, 

M. L. Kasmar, 
S. L. Lowenthal, 
W. M. Lawton, 
A. Ross, 
L. H. Trude, 
H. M. Carter, 
J. H. Hopkins, 
W. A. Cunnea, 
Minerva Doyle, 

F. A. Denison, 

F. J. L. Meyer, 

G. E. Read, 

J. J. Schwartz, 

A. Wahl, 

G. M. Davidson, 
V. J. Peterson, 
F. B. Van Saun, 

B. M. Smith, 



86 





^ ^^ •^HE ••Hamilton Literary Society" existed for over ten 
years in the Union College of Law, but died a peaceful 
death in September, 1887. The cause of the demise 
was ,; Elavatoria ;" that is, laziness, — the members being 
averse to climbing four nights of stairs, and the eleva- 
tor man being opposed to elevating the legal imbeciles all day without 
an occasional inducement. 

On October 7, 1887, at 8 p.m., in the class-room of the LTnion 
College of Law, the "''Webster Literary Society " emerged into bene 
esse. The Preamble of the Constitution explains its objects and pur- 
poses in the following words and figures, to-wit : 

" We, students of the ' Union College of Law,' in order to avoid 
embarrassment arising from speaking in public, to acquire the ability 
of forensic eloquence, and to become generally informed by discuss- 
ing the important topics of the day, do organize," etc., etc. 

Perfect is the music rendered by the Junior Class Quartette, and 
the solos and duetts occasionally inflicted upon the stillness of night, 
Tiave already banished from the class-room the rodents who were wont 
to nibble at the lunches of the pharmacy boys. With S4.60 in the 
treasury, no liabilities, a handsome chairman and enthusiastic mem- 
bers, the Webster Literary Society has gained an enviable reputation 
as a reformatory institution, and its success and long life are assured. 



87 






© , © 



a%D CSraterriisies 





LAW FRATERNITY. 



Founded at University of Michigan, 1870. 



COLORS: WINE COLOR AND PEARL BLUE. 



Active Chapter Roll. 

Kent — University of Michigan. 

Booth — Union College of Law, Chicago. 

Benjamin — Illinois Wesleyan University. 
Cooley — St. Louis Law School. 

Pomeroy — University of California. 
Story — Columbia Law School. 

Webster — Boston University 
j AY — Albany Law School. 

Marshall— Columbian Law School, Washington. 
Hamilton — Cincinnati Law College. 

Gibson— University of Pennsylvania. 

Choate — Harvard Law School. 

Waite — Yale Law School 



89 






HE Legal Fraternity of Phi Delta Phi was founded at the 
law department of the University of Michigan, about 
twenty years ago. 

Colleges of Liberal Arts had their Greek letter fra- 
ternities, and why should not Law Schools? 

It should bring together congenial men from the classes of the 
law school wherein it originated, and add to the serious duties of pro- 
fessional study, the pleasures of social life. Its members should be 
men in the true sense of the word, and its influence should be felt by 
them long after the completion of the law school course. With this 
end in view, Phi Delta Phi was established at Ann Arbor, and for a 
number of years was successful and prosperous before any attempt 
was made to organize other chapters. Finally, in '77, Booth Chapter 
was established in Chicago. In '81, a chapter was organized at 
Columbia, and now almost fifteen chapters exist in flourishing condi- 
tion. 

Booth Chapter is practically a Senior organization, enough men 
from the Junior class being taken in toward the end of each year to 
perpetuate the society organization. 

The aim of the organization is not what popular opinion would 
have it, viz. : to " run" class politics, and nothing else. The history 
of the past year has been no new record in regard to the popular feel- 
ing toward the society. Be it far from our desire to boast that we are 
faultless, but we must insist that, did those who attack better under- 
stand themselves, they would appreciate the fraternity more highly. 

In the ranks of Phi Delta Phi are to be found the names of three 
of the U. S. Supreme Court Judges, the Chairman of the Inter-State 
Commission, numerous active and retired State Judges, members of 
the Faculty of this School, besides many of the brightest young law- 
yers of this city. 

Hence we do not fear for the dignity of our order, but pursue the 
even tenor of our way, helping each other and increasing our frater- 
nal affection for each other. 

J. C. Copley, Consul, M. O. Naramore, Scriptor. 

J. H. Hopkins, Vice- Consul. 



90 



BOOTH CHAPTER 



V«hi Delia phi.) 



»>: 



:)Established 1877.C 



:^ 



Abbott, S. G. 
Aborn, E. A. 
Adcock, H. C. 
Anthony, J. B. 
Anthony, C. E. 
Anthony, G. D. 
Babb, J. E. 
Bangs, F. A. 
Barnard, J. C. 
Barnum, A. W. 
Bloom, D. H. 
Bowersock, C. C. 
Bradley, Thos. E. D. 
Brockway, Guy. 
Brooks, F. L. 
Brooks, L. C. 
Burhans, J. A. 
Burnon, E. F. 
Caldwell, F. C. 
Cass, G. W. 
Camp, A. B. 
Clark, F. H. 
Cooper, H. N. 
Cook, G. C. 
Culver, H. N. 

CUMMINGS, E. S. 



Hon. Henry Booth, 



Fratres in Vrbe. 

Douglass, F. L. 
Doyle, W. A. 
Errant, J. W. 
Felsenthal, E. B. 
Fitch, J. H. 
Forbes, A. B. 
Foster, Wm. Elmore. 
Gardner, James P. 
Glade, J. H. 
Going, J. F. 
Gridley, M. M. 
Heath, Wm. R. 
Hubbell, H. B. 
Hopkins, F. L. 
Helmer, F. A. 
Knight, T. D. 
LaForgee, Chas. A. 
Lowden, F. O. 
Lund, Adolph. 
Maher, Edward. 
Manning, A. K. 
May, J. A. 
McCollach, F. H. 
McDonald, L. A. 
McDowell, J. E. 
Morgan, G. N. 

Fratres in Facilitate. 

Hon. Wm. W. Farwell, 



Newell, Grant. 
Norden, Gabriel J. 
Paulson, W. A. 
Pinckney, M. W. 
Pease, F. B. 
Pagin, O. G. 
Parks, Sam'l S. 
Patterson, Fred G. 
Porter, G. E. 
Pratt, Geo. E. M. 
Purcell, J. M. 
Rogers, G. M. 
Runyan, E. F., Jr. 
Ruth, L. C 
Scott, F. H. 
Smith, L. L. 
Snow, D. D. 
Stillman, H. W. 
Walker, F. W. 
Walther, S. A. 
Wean, F. L. 
Wood, Walpole. 
Wheeler, A. D. 
Weinschenk, L. 
Weimers, W. F. 
White, G. F. 



Hon. H. B. Hurd. 



Wm. H. Allen, 
Wm. A. Cunnea, 
Chas. R. Francis, 
Jacob H. Hopkins, 
Milt. O. Naramore, 
Samuel E. Vermilyea, 
Hosea W. Wells, 
Howard M. Carter. 
Oscar Middlekauff, 
Walter W. Ross, 
A. B. Stratton, 



Active Members. 

Chas. A. Buell, 
Alfred Cowles, Jr. 
Francis W. Goodbody, 
Solomon L. Lowenthal, 
Chas. C. Stilwell, 
F. JL. Velde. 
John H. Garnsey, 
George R. Mitchell, 
William H. Safford, 
T. A. Straight, 
Lucius W. Winchester, 



Ira C. Copley, 
Max A. Drezmel, 
Thos. A. Hendricks, 
John A. McKeever, 
Samuel H. G. Trude, 
Grover E. Walter, 
William W. Allen, 
Samuel F. Hawley, 
Alva Ross, 
B. M. Smith. 



91 




LHAA£ FRHTeRNITY. 
Founded at the Union College of Z,aw, Feb. 25, A. D. 1887. 



COLORS: MAROON AND SILVER GRAY. 



JUSTINIAN CHAPTER, 

(rtiucnn Kappa phi. 



Established 1887. 



Adams, George P., 
Barnum, Frank H., 
Burch, Albert M., 
Brace, Harrison H., 
Clark, Charles D. 
Doud, Eli H., 
Dyrenforth, Julius W. 
Gary, Carleton N., 



Fratres Advocati. 

Hacker, Nicholas W., 
Higgins, Milton O., 
Huston, R. J., 
Jenks, C. E., 
Jones, Harry F., 
Kehl, Charles H., 
McEwin, W. M., 
Maryatt, T. P. 



Pendarvis, R. E , 
Simons, Charles B., 

TOLMAN, W. W., 

Trude, George A., 
Van Glahn, August, 
Wendell, E. E., 
Wood, Charles A. 



Members of the Senior Class. 



Carpenter, Grant, 
Hogluni), John H., 
Kkikte, Edward C, 
Meyering, Henry. 



OSTEREICHER, LEOPOLD M., SCHWARZ, JOHN J., 

Peterson, Victor J., Ullrich, Walter, 

Sauter, Frederick V., Wiedinger, George T. 





OR ten years, in the Union College of Law. has existed a 
fraternity having for its aim and object the controlling 
of class politics, and the procurement of all class hon- 
ors for its members. This was the condition of affairs 
in the spring of 1887, when several members of the class 
of '87, recognizing the fact that a new fraternity, founded on legal and 
equitable principles, to guard the rights of its members and oppose 
conspiracies against the common interests of the students, and for the 
maintenance of the dignity of the class as a unit, was necessary, 
organized what is known as " Omega Kappa Phi," having for its aim, 
not class supremacy, but friendship and assistance among its mem- 
bers, and harmony in the class. 

Omega Kappa Phi is liberal in its tendencies, aiming at fraternity 
in the broadest acceptation of the term, and is not an aristocracy of 
" pre- Adamite ancestral descent ;" it cannot trace its ancestry back 
to a " protoplasmal primordial atomic globule," but in its humility it 
is proud of its " plebeistic cosmopolitan composition." 




93 



GoMlEGE OF° fD EDlClNE. 




Faculty. 

JOSEPH CUMMINGS, D.D., LL.D., President. 



IIOSMER A. JOHNSON, M.D., LL.D. (Emeritus). 
EDWARD O. F. ROLER, A.M., M.D. (Emeritus). 



NATHAN S. DAVIS, M.D., LL.D., Dean. 

FRANK BILLINGS, M.D., Secretary. 

EDMUND ANDREWS, M.D., LL.D., Treasurer. 

RALPH N. ISHAM, A.M., M.D. 

JOHN H. HOLLISTER, A.M., M.D. 

SAMUEL J. JONES, M.D., LL.D. 

MARCUS P. HATFIELD, A.M., M.D. 

JOHN H. LONG, Sc.D 

EMILIUS CLARK DUDLEY, A.B., M.D. 

JOHN E. OWENS, M.D. 

OSCAR C. DeWOLF, A.M., M.D. 

WALTER HAY, M.D., LL.D. 

FREDERICK C. SCHAEFER, M.D. 

ISAAC N. DANFORTH, A.M., M.D. 

WILLIAM E. CASSELBERRY, M.D. 

WILLIAM W. JAGGARD, A.M., M.D. 

NATHAN S. DAVIS, Jr., A.M., M.D. 

FRANK S. JOHNSON, A.M., M.D. 

E. WYLLYS ANDREWS, A.M., M.D. 

FRANK T. ANDREWS, A.M., M.D. 

GEORGE W. WEBSTER, M.D. 

WM. E. MORGAN, M.D. 

ELBERT WING, A.M., M.D. 

HERBERT H. FROTHINGHAM, M.D. 

JUNIUS C. HOAG, Ph.M., M.D. 

WILLIAM N. HIBBARD, A.M., M.D. 

GEORGE S. ISHAM, AM., M.D. 



94 



Class of y 8g. 



Baer, Almerin Webster, Ph.G. 
Balfour, Carlton Montville, 
Barney, Lee Mason, 
Bassett, Foster W. 
Beard, Leslie Abbey, 
Berry, John Childs, 
Bischoff, Henry Adolph, Ph.G. 
Blesh, Abraham Lincoln, 
Boeseke, Elmer Julius, 
Bouton, Wm. Christopher, A.B. 
Burn aid, Horace Wm. 
Chandler, Joseph, 
Childs, Charles Williams, 
Chloupek, Edmund, 
Dodds, Joseph Chambers, B.L. 
Edgerly, Edward Tyler, A.B. 
Eiss, Daniel Webster, B.S. 
Ellis, Edward J. C. 
Garrett, Elmer Ellsworth, 
Gary, Isaiah Clark, 
Graves, Chas. Herman, 
Hall, Alfred Marvin, A.B. 
Hambaugh, Ralph Emerson, 
Haskins, George William, D.D. S. 
Houston, James Perry, A.B. 
Humphrey, William David, M.A. 

Younj 



Jipson, Norton William, 
Johnson, Charles F, 
Jones, Frank Collet, 
Lewke, Otto William, 
Lumley, Clint Grant, B.L. 
Moore, Floyd B., B.S. 
McCleary, Wilbur Wallace, 
McCollum, James Leslie, A.B. 
Mclntyre, Chas. Wm. 
McNamara, Francis Wm. 
Montezuma, Chas., B.S. 
Poehls, Jacob, 
Prentice, Pierrepont Isham, 
Reilley, James Lawrence, 
Ruthenberg, Erich Benno, 
Sanders, Jas. Wm. 
Schuman, O. Valandingham, 
Sixta, Lewis H. 
Skelton, Leonard Lawshe, 
Stein, Simon Gerberich, A.B. 
Stowe, Bond, A.B. 
Stringfield, Cornelius P. 
Stubbs, Joseph Chase, 
Voss, Casto, 
Westphal, Robert Jr. 
Wilson, Warren W. 
;, Alben, A.B. 



Aikens, James Sanford, 
Armbruster, Harry Charles, 
Atwood, R. Jay, 
Barr, James Holmes, 
Blocksidge, James Jenkin, 
Boody, George, 
Boody, Frank Dwight, 
Bradley, Charles Herbert, 
Burdick, Gordon Granger, 
Butler, Francis Albert, Ph.G. 
Campbell, Frank James, Ph.B 
Clapper, Manford Marion, 
Croker, James Norman, 
Cutler, Joseph Stanley, 
Dickerman, Edward Thayer, 
Dodds, Robert, 
Eddy, Everett Henry, B.L. 
Eichberg, Louis Robert, 
Everett, Vernon Lemmon, 
Faber, Paul Julius, Ph.B. 
Felmlee, Samuel Theodore, 
Gehrmann, Adolph Arthur, 
Goodheart, John Walter, 
Hall, Andy, 
Halstead, Edward A. 



Class of 'go. 

Harper, Frank Mason, 
Hepburn, Jared Charles, 
Holland, Philo Leon, 
Kauffman, Herman Bernard, 
Kercher, John, 
Keyes, Albert Belch am, 
Knights, Frederic Arnott, 
Lesage, Philip, A.B. 
Link, John Joseph, 
Mater, Elmer Lincoln, 
Owen, Charles Starr, 
Owens, Edmund Burt, 
Palmer, Enos Ephraim, B.S. 
Penn, George Thomas, 
Penney, Myron, 
Richardson, William Wise, 
Rude, Thomas Jefferson, 
Rulien, Peter Gideon, 
Sage, William Godfrey, Ph.B. 
Sherman, Adin, 
Small, William Boswell, 
Stewart, James, 
Thome, James Prescott, 
Todd, William Edward, 
Wilson, William Franklin, 
Woitishek, Frank Joseph. 



95 



Class of '91, 



Alderson, James, B.D. 
Arnold, Philip, 
Bartley, Charles, 
Bliss, Malcolm Andrews, D.D.S. 
Brehm, Theodore George, 
Bulson, Albert Eugene, Jr., B.S. 
Burdick, Alfred Stephen, A. 15. 
Burger, Berthold, 
Burns, Peter Thomas, 
Byl, John James, 
Carlsson, Eben, A.B. 
Clark, John Samuel, Jr. 
Christensen, Anthony, 
Cook, Clinton Tyng, 
Connell, Daniel Richard, 
Coy, Robert Edward, 
Curtis, Austin Maurice, A.B. 
De Lee, Joseph Bolivar, 
Donnelly, Francis John, 
Dudley, Lewis, 
Durr, William Emil, B.S. 
Edwards, Arthur Robin, 
Everett, Henry Houghton, 
Farren, John Alfonsus, 
Fisher, A. Danforth, 
Flinn, Wilson, 
Frenz, William, 
■Gulick, John Maynard, 
Hargens, Charles William, 
Haven, Walter Silas, A.B. 
Heckard, Martin Otis, 
Hoffman, John Raymond, 
Jones, Thomas Richard, A.B. 
Kierulff, Ludwig Arent, 
Leeming, Charles Whitaker, 
Markham, Homer E. 
Matheny, Ralph C. 
Maynard, Charles E. 
McDowell, William S. 

Zaun, 



McKay, Eli Emerson, 
McLaughlin, William Kirby, A.M. 
McXamara, John Samuel, 
Miller, Edward Crane, 
Nicoll, David Taylor, 
Oakley, James Hurdus, 
Parker, Elmer Hiram, B.S. 
Penick, Ninus Smith, 
Piper. Charles, 
Pollock, Philip, 
Pritzker, Louis, 
Rawson, Edward Clark, 
Roan, Charles Frederick, 
Ross, James C, B.S. 
Rud, Anthony, B.S. 
Ruml, Wentzle, 
Schaefer, Herman Levinus, 
Schroeder, William Edward, 
Schwarz, Leigh Ewing, 
Scovell, Halsey Boardman, 
Singleton, Eustace Monett, 
Squire, Lucius Melander, B.S. 
Stevens, Harry Lester, 
Sturgeon, Robert H. 
Swank, Clyde Ware, B.S. 
Swanlund, Albert Andrew, 
Todd, Forrest Bogue, 
Tuck, William, 
Tull, Frank Edward, 
Turck, Fenton Benedict, 
Van Dyke, George Henry, 
Walls, Frank Xavier, 
White, Clem, 

Williams, Charles Winthrop, 
Wilson, Edgar Morris, 
Windesheim, Gustave, 
Wright, Arthur Octavius, 
Yockey, William Martin, 
Youtz, Lewis A. 
Henry Hamilton. 




(^Qfiirfietfijttnn 

CrflCAGO MEDICAL COLLE6E , 

Central Music Hall, Tuesday, March 26, i88g. 
Ppogpamme. 



Music. 
Prayer, ----- Rev. Joseph Cummings, D.D., LL.D. 

Music. 
Class History, ------ W. C. Bouton. 

Valedictory, - - - - - - - C. G. Lumley. 

Award of Certificates to Undergraduate Classes. 

Award of Prizes. 

Conferring of Degrees. 

Music. 

Address to Graduating Class, - Pres. Joseph Cummings, D.D., LL.D. 

Music. 
Benediction. 



PRIZES HMHHDED. 
Faculty Prizes for best theses : F. W. McNamara. 
Ingals Prize of $ioo for highest average in Literature ; J. P. Houston. 
Jones Prize : second highest average in Literature : L. L. Skelton. 
Andrews Prize : best essay on Clinical Surgery : E. J. Boeseke. 
Fowler Prize : $100 case test lenses, for greatest proficiency in Theoretical and Prac- 
x tical Optics : C. M. Balfour. 



Alumni Banquet, ...... Evening March 25. 

Alumni Meeting, ------ Evening March 26. 

97 



Illinois (College of ^harmaey. 



FACULTY. 

JOSEPH CUMMINGS, D.D., LL.D., President. 
OSCAR OLDBERG, P.D., Dean. 

Professor of Pharmacy, and Director of the Pharmaceutical Labo- 
ratories. 

JOHN H. LONG, Sc.D., 

Professor of Chemistry, and Director of the Chemical Laboratory. 

W. E. QUINE, M.D., 

Professor of Physiology, Materia Medica, Therapeutics. 

W. K. HIGLEY, Ph.C., 

Professor of Botany and Pharmacognosy, and Director of the 
Microscopical Laboratory. 

MARK POWERS, B.Sc, 

Assistant in the Chemical Laboratory. 

MAURICE A. MINER, Ph.C, 

Assistant to the Chair of Pharmacy. 



Bate, Henry J. 
Blain, Clement. 
Bockfinger, George. 
Bonn, Louis E. 
Curtis, R. Wall. 
Edgar, William H. 
Engelcke, August. 
Hollister, George S. 
Hopperstead, Orion. 
Humiston, Ray. 



CLHSS ©F= '59, 

Kitner, David G. 
Lowe, William H. 
Magee, John J. 
McKibbin, Charles A. 
Medill, Cyrus D. 
Parker, William R. 
Robey, Ida H. 
Rowen, Harley B. 
Santee, John, Jr. 
Shaible, John F. 



Shorthose, Wm. F. 
Shriver, Wm. A., Jr. 
Skeyhan, Frederick F. 
Smith, Harry L. 
Thornton, John P. 
Uhrus, William. 
Walton, Fenwick C. 
Wendall, Grant. 
Worcester, Frank D. 



98 



CLKSS OF *90. 



Abrahamson, John A. 
Anderson, Peter A. 
Ashby, Turner. 
Bagley, William S. 
Baguley, Clarence B. 
Berger, Mrs. Louisa. 
Bjerke, John C. 
Black, Frank W. 
Bolles, Chester H. 
Bonslett, Benjamin. 
Brewer, Clifford W. 
Briggs, Frank M. 
Brookings, Charles M. 
Burger, Joseph A. 
Burgower, Joseph. 
Carlson, John Levi. 
Coen, George H. 
Collins, Dennis C. 
Cook, Frank E. 
Coxe, J. Clarence. 
Day, James B. 
Dean, Cornelius C. 
Dodd, Archibald B. 
Dreever, George. 
Evans, Samuel B. 
Fay, Frank S. 
Ganson, R. E. Lee. 
Grisvvold, Frederick H. 
Haiselden, Harry. 
Hatcher, Richard H. 
Hauptman, J. Henry. 



Hogan, M. Jerry. 
Houghton, Edgar J. 
Huftord, Edward H. 
Jackson, George H. 
Jarman, Allen. 
Kahn, Harry. 
Keil, Julius. 
Kennedy, Arthur. 
Kenney, Blitz G. 
Kespler, Frank E. 
Kiesel, John G. F. 
Kuntz, J. Frank. 
Kuenster, Frederick T. 
Lathrop, Charles E. 
Leiseburg, August. 
Leszczynski, Joseph. 
Lienhardt, J. Edward. 
Loring, Helen D. 
McCormick, Bruce. 
McKee, Frank W. 
Martin, Warren L. 
Merrill, Frank D. 
Moen, Kate. 
Moore, Frank A. B. 
Morrison, Frederick W. 
Patterson, Charles W. 
Pearl, Joseph F. 
Peterson, Frederick. 
Pettee, George P. 
Phillips, Everett M. 
Porter, Arthur H. 



Porter, Jessie M. 
Porter, J. William. 
Potter, Charles E. 
Powers, James. 
Richards, Louis W. 
Rizleben, Thomas. 
Roenitz, Herman F. 
Rossiter, James E. 
Rowe, Jessie H. 
Sawyer, Wm. Lafayette. 
Schimansky, Frank J. 
Schmidt, Gustav A. 
Schroeder, William M 
Selmer, George. 
Schaffer, Lorenzo C. 
Show, Herman. 
Sherman, Frank P. G. 
Singrey, Edwin F. 
Sprague, Edgar S. 
Stone, Clare P. 
Thometz, Anthony. 
Thrapp, Harry S. 
Urheim, Lars. 
Williams, Sidney H. 
Witherspoon, Elmer E. 
Wittman, Frederick A. 
Woodward, Bert. 
Woolley, Frank W. 
Wooten, Thomas V. 
Wright, Frank B. 




99 



.olkcje of Pental and (J)pal ||ungcnij 



FHCULTY. 
W. W. ALLPORT, M.D., D.D.S. (Emeritus). 



JOHN S. MARSHALL, M.D., Dean. 

R. F. LUDWIG, D.D.S. 

CHAS. P. PRUYN, M.D., D.D.S. 

L. P. HASKELL, D.D.S. 

C. R. BAKER, D.D.S. 

ARTHUR B. FREEMAN, M.D., D.D.S. 

ARTHUR E. MATTESON. 

I. A. FREEMAN. 

GEO. W. WHITEFIELD, M.D., D.D.S. 

E. S. CLIFFORD, D.D.S. 



~<D~ 



STUD6NTS. 
FIRST YEAR. 

Cochems, Frank Nichols, Cook, George Washington, Dye, William B., 

Goldthorp, Ellsworth, Harper, William E., Ralph, Wilmer Percy, 

Richardson, Lucius Elbert, Taft, Jonathan Ray, 

Valette, William Omar, Weinlander, John. 



Hunt, Samuel H., 



Palmer, John B. 



SECOND YEAR. 

McCord, William B., 

HNNOUNC6MSNT, 

The Collegiate Year will begin on Tuesday, September 24, 
1889, and terminate on Tuesday, March 25, 1890, on which day the 
Public Commencement Exercises will occur. The Spring course will 
begin on April 1, and terminate June 28, 1890. 

100 




& 



Sekool of Oratory 




ROBERT L. CUMNOCK, 



Professor of Rhetoric and Elocution. 



CLHSS OF '59. 

Beers, F. W., Long, James Morrow, 

Jones, Lulu E., Langstaff, Margaret D., 

LUDDINGTON, HATTIE M., MURPHY, ADDIE L., 



Morgan, Belle, 
Ryan, M. Estelle, 
Weeden, B. M. 



Dice, Eva, 
Fuller, Zula H., 
Gifford, Myrtle M, 
Hutchison, Lulu, 
Jenks, L., 
Knox, Grace E., 

LOINING, J., 

Moore, Laura B., 



CLHSS ©f= 

McDermott, E. E., 
Powell, F. W., 
Penner, H., 
Pearsons, H., 
Richey, Agnes, 
Ridgway, E. J., 
Searles, Mae, 
Studebaker, C, 



90. 



Sutton, S. T., 
Sheldon, Mabel, 
Tisdel, F. M., 
Vail, Jennie, 
Warner, Abbie M. 
Wheat, C. S., 
Watrous, C. T. 



H. 



Alden, W. T., 
Adams, J. P., 
Bass, Stella, 
Bennett, A., 
Brumbaugh, E 
Calkins, H. R., 
Chapin, Betsey C. 
Clarke, Edith, 
Craig, A. E., 
Carson, W., 
Ewing, E. A., 



SPECIAL STUDENTS, 

Garton, Edith, 
Hayes, A. R., 
Martin, R. P., 
Mulvane, Marguerite, 
Meredith, Jennie H., 
Nutting, W., 
Prescott, Lillian B., 
Phelps, A. H., 
Quereau, E. C, 
Robinson, Anna, 



Straw, F. W., 
Shumway, P. R., 
Stevens, Ida B., 
Thwing, C B., 

TUTTLE, W. H., 

Woods, C. C, 

Wiley, Kittie, 

Willey, J. A., 

Whitefield, G. W. 

Wheeler, F. M., 

Yetter, D. M. 



101 




FACULTY. 

Oren E. Locke, Director, Piano Forte, Organ, Harmony and Composition, and the 
History of Music. 

Fred L. Lawrence, Piano Forte and Organ. 

Joseph Singer, Violin, Viola and Violoncello. 

Charles E. Quinlan, Violin. 

W. Warren Graves, Piano Forte and Organ. 

Andrew J. Phillips, Instructor in Vocal Culture, Singing and Italian. 

C. Montgomery Hutchins, Cornet, Clarionet, Flute and Band Instruments. 

Mrs. C. A. Phelps, Harp. 

C. S. Cook, B.S., Lecturer on Laws of Sound. 

R. L. Cumnock, A.M., Elocution. 

Total Number of Students, i888->89, 186. 



102 




DEPfl^T|V[EHT of RHt. 

@ . - - - © 



CATHARINE BEAL, B.P., Directress. 



Maud L. Baum, 
Olive L. Benton, 
Lulu B. Berkey, 
Rosalie M. Berkey, 
Hattie Caughran, 
Elizabeth F. Davis, 
Cora L. Dutton, 
Maud Garnsey, 



REGULAR STUDENTS. 

Emma I. Johnson, 
Anna Johnston, 
Lulu Jones, 
Eva F. Kamrar, 
Grace Knox, 
Nettie Leininger, 
Roberta Long, 
Emma Logeman, 



Emma Marshall, 
Jeannette Mercer, 
May Morse, 
Lillian B. Prescott, 
Libby R. Roberts, 
Anna Sargent, 
Carrie M. Shammo, 
Anna Towle. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 
Gentlemen, 61. Ladies, 55- 



103 



_^£ #5 2 

lrr@pmrmi®ry IJ ep> uriwtmn t , 

Fourth Year, - - 58 

Third Year, - gi 

Second Year, - 112 

First Year, - - - 131 

College Students, (Including Freshmen from Preparatory) 118 

FHCULTY. 

Rev. Herbert F. Fisk, D.D., Wesleyan Univ., '60, Principal. 

Rev. Joseph L. Morse, A.M., Wesleyan Univ., '59. 

George H. Horswell, Ph.D., N. W. U., '79. 

Charles B. Atwell, Ph.M., Syracuse Univ., '79. 

Harriet A. Kimball, Ph.M., N. W. U., '83. 

Alonzo J. Howe, A.M., Univ. of Rochester, '56. 

Joseph R. Taylor, A.M., Wesleyan Univ., '82. 

Leila M. Crandon, Ph.M., N. W. U., '84. 

Charles B. Thwing, A.B., N. W. U., '88. 

Florence E. Homer, B.S., Wellesley College, '86. 




104 









f$ft 



OFFICERS. 






W. W. WILKINSON, President 
W. R. TUCKER, Vice-President 
H. A. MOEHLENPAH, Secretary 
C. S. ALDRICH, . . Treasurer 
H. L. HARVEY, Sergt.-at-Arms 

E. J. SMITH, Critic 

C. V. La FONTAINE, Chaplain 
J. A. WATTE, . . . Organist 
L. THOMAS, . . Ambassador 
W. E. WAY, .... Choristei 



I, 



./// 



i 

f 
4/ 

7 




MEMBERS. 




P. C. Atkinson, 


H. E. Eichhorn, 


H. Morris, 


7 


W. Atkinson, 


H.'J. Elliott, 


H. H. Melville, 


7 ,V 


C. R. Adair, 


T. M. Eldridge, 


H. H. Moehlenpah, 


E. V. Abbott, 


L. W. Hedge, 


P. L. Odor, 


M. E. Ashley 


A. R. Hayes, 


W. M. Raymond, 


fflz 


C. S. Aldrich, 


H. O. Harbach, 


J. C. Richey, 


W. W. Batcheller, 


A. B. Harbert, 


E. A. Robinson, 




A. Bennett, 


H. L. Harvey, 


J. J. Shutterly, 




A. F. Butters, 


E. L. Harvey, 


E. J. Smith, 




A. H. Bradford, 


F. C. Hoople, 


W. R. Tucker, 




B. F. Berryman, 


H. H. Jarvis, 
F. Klein, 


H. Terhune, 




J. B. Canfield, 


L. Thomas, 




J. H. Cole, 


H. Kennedy, 


J. A. Watte, 




D. C. Clancy, 


F. W. Leavitt, 


W. E. Way, 




f F. W. Dudley, 


C. V. La Fontaine, 


W. W. Wilkinson, 




w W. M. Ewing, 


W. S. Mitchell 


A. E. Woodward, 


TfM m 


B. Emmett, 


E. C. Mosher, 


J. C. Zeller. 






105 



r* uphronial iterary 




OFFICERS. 



G. F. CRAIG, 
JACOB LOWING, 
BENJ. RTST, 
W. J. FREDERICK, 
H. B. WILKINSON, 
J. M. ERICSON, 
J. F. ROBERTS, 
T. K. GALE, 
J. L. WALKER, 
M. M. HARRIS, 
C. A. KELLEY, 



Anderson, A. B. 
Anderson, John. 
Andrews, G. B. 
Bacon, F. C. 
Baker, Frank. 
Bartle, J. B. 
Beazell, B. F. 
Benham, A. J. 
Berryman, Joseph. 
Booth, L. R. 
Bonebright, J. E. 
Boys, J. H. 
Brient, W. J. 
Campbell, R. A. 
Campbell, W. C. 
Canham, J. E. 
Carter, O. M. 
Casper, C. C. 
Church, John. 
Clark, F. M. 
Colebeck, Edward. 
Coss, O. A. 
Craig, G. F. 
Crowell, E. F. 
Cusson, A. J. 
Davis, P. T. 
Decker, C. E. 
DeVol, E. E. 
Dixon, J. A. 



MEMBERS. 

Dopking, L. I. 
Douglas, S. S. 
Earnheart, L. T. 
Eddy, W. L. 
Ericson, J. M. 
Falconer, W. C. 
Fisher, F. N. 
Fowler, E. B. 
Frederick, W. J. 
Gale, T. K. 
Gibson, L. W. 
Gilbert, F. S. 
Hair, J. W. 
Harris, M. M. 
Hauslein, G. M. 
Helm, A. T. 
Hough, G. J. 
Jackson, F. J. 
Johnson, D. J. 
Johnson, H. J. 
Kelley, C. A. 
Kelly, Wm. 
Kraft, Albert. 
Levere, W. C. 
Loining, Jacob. 
Marsh, W. E. 
Mishler, J. F. 
Munson, J. H. 
Nelson, Jacob. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Assistant Secretary 

Treasurer 

Critu 

Sergeant-at-Arms 

Ambassador 

Chaplain 

Organist 

Chorister 



Ozanne, H. G. 
Peehl, J. A. 
Quinn, F. V. 
Rawlins, D. B. 
Ream, T. E. 
Reavis, C. F. 
Reynolds, D. E. 
Rich, Frank. 
Ricketts, H. T. 
Rist, Benj. 
Roberts, J. ¥. 
Russell, C. S. 
Sauermann, W. O. 
Stephens, C. A. 
Stevens, P. R. W. 
Strawn, L. F. 
Spunner, G. W. 
Thompson, J. II. 
Tuttle, E. V. 
Walker, J. L. 
Ward, A. M. 
Wilcoxon, H. D. 
Wilkinson, H. B. 
Wilson, P. C. 
Wing, A. G. 
Young, Samuel. 
Yount, J. S. 



106 



ugensia | iterary 



|ociett). 



JL^*±. 



OFFICERS. 



EDITH M. BAKER, 
JESSIE WILDER, 
ALICE DEE GREENE, 
CARA DuBROEK, 
ELLA BUTTERS, 
HATTIE CAUGHRAN, 
PEARL PETERSON, 
EMMA CLOW, 
PEARL MINNICK, 



President 

Vice-Presdent 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Critic 

Chaplain 

Marshal 

Ambassador 

Chorister and Organist 



Allen, Maud, 
Ailing, Hattye, 
Armour, Bertha, 
Baker, M. Edith, 
Banta, Mae, 
Butters, Ella, 
Canfield, Blanch, 
Canfield, Mae, 
Caughran, Hattye, 
Chapin, Bessie, 
Clow, Emma, 
Crowell, Grace E. 
De Golyer, Winnie, 



MEMBERS. 

Dingee, Mae, 
Fitch, Josie, 
Greene, Alice Dee, 
Hayes, Lotta, 
Haviland, Carrie, 
Keade, Grace, 
Langdon, Emma, 
Marsh, Luella I. 
Milne, Flora, 
Minnick, Pearl, 
Owen, Grace, 
Parks, Sarah, 
Peterson, Pearl, 



Searles, N. Mae, 
Shaffer, Anna, 
Sargent, Carla Ethel, 
Shutterly, Lillie, 
Scott, Lucy, 
Shober, Minnie, 
Tobey, Florence, 
Tubbs, Myra E. 
Wilder, Jessie, 
Wambaugh, Erne A. 
Wilcox, Hattie, 
Williams, Marguerite, 
Yail, Evilyn, 



107 



KANSAS CITY 



||orthtrjestern Jihimni J|ssoeiation 



Founded in 1888. 



-««^ I II I I I I I I I II I I I I II I I }^%V 



OFFICERS. 



H. H. PALMER, '72, 
H. P. WRIGHT, '87 - 
H. H. PALMER, '72, 
S. W. McPHERRIN, '77, 
O. E. LUCAS, U. C. L., '87, 



- President 
Secretary 

Executive Committee 



H. S. Wicks, '71, 

Tim Bradley, '77, 

Frank Tyler, '79, 
*Ida Simmons, '91, 
*Myrtle Kimberlin, '91, 
*George F. Root, '84, 
Jno. Wicks, 

D. H. Harnsberger, U. C. L., '77, 
H. G. Leonard, C. M. C, '78, 



MEMBERS. 

H. H. Palmer, '72, *W. H. Craig, '69, 

F. F. Cassiday, '78, H. P. Wright, '87, 

S. C. McPherrin, '77, Julia Fitch, '88, 

*Mrs. Maud Towt, nee Kendall, '90, Mrs. IrvingiQueal,'78 > 
Mrs. J. McPherrin, nee Moore, '79, *W. F. Wakeman, '74, 
O. A. Lucas, U. C. L., '87, *F. C. Waugh, '89, 

C. E. Hasbrook, U. C. L., Mamie Northrup, 

B. H. Chapman, U. C. L., '74, 
Dr. Henderson, C. M. C, '80, 



Dr. Burrill, C. M. C, '76. 



* Did not receive a degree. 



108 




u 



oj*JLjlxi in 



-/> /Sx^ 



dLMy 



ai?%?ett ^ihlx&al ^n&tituto* 



FACULTY. 

Rev. HENRY B. RIDGWAY, D.D., President. 

Rev. MINER RAYMOND, D.D., LL.D, 

Rev. CHARLES F. BRADLEY, D.D. 

Rev. CHARLES W. BENNETT, D.D., LL.D. 

ROBERT L. CUMNOCK, A.M. 

Rev. CHARLES HORSWELL, A.M., B.D. 

Rev. NELS E. SIMONSEN, A.M., B.D. 



Summary of Students. 

Senior Class, ------ 2 g 

Middle Class, ------ 43 

Junior Class, ...... 7 g 

Norwegian-Danish Department, - - 24 

Total, ----- I7r 




Rev. ALBERT ERICSON, President. 



Surnmauy of Students. 

Seniors, ....... 6 

Middle, - ... 5 

Jnniors, ....... I3 

Total, - - - - - 24 



109 



Literary Department. 



® 



TRIG CREMATION 



<D 



pt»om a Neuu Standpoint. 



[Translated from a foreign journal by an accomplished linguist on the SYLLABUS 
Board.— Ed.] 

Taganrog, Dec. 31, 1888. 




the Russia?i Scientific Intelligencer, Ivan Kalinkoff, 
scientist, ethnologist, and traveler, sends greeting. 
Impelled by a powerful desire to know the globe and 
the races of men which inhabit it, while yet in early 
manhood, I set my face toward the rising sun and trav- 
ersed all those broad and arid lands which lie between the 
City of Astrakhan and the China Sea. But overland travel 
I found tedious work, and, tired of saddles and the trails of 
caravans, I determined thereafter to journey solely by water. 
However, since it was my object to view lands and not 
oceans, I resolved to make the passage, so far as possible, a 
Jrans-continentaX one. Forcing Behring's Strait, I pushed back on the 
course of McClure, through the Arctic Sea and into Hudson Bay, 



then 



up 



the Nelson River and the Red River of the North, and 



passed in a boat from the headwaters of the latter into one of the great 
streams confluent with the Mississippi. Through a canal I reached a 
mighty mid-continental metropolis called Chicago. Down a channel 
that flowed with diluted jelly of a murky color and remarkable odor, 
I gained a vast fresh water sea called Michigan, and set my face to 
the northward. Here begins my real story. It was on the night of 
June 14, in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred eighty-eight. I 
was 12 miles north of Chicago, off thickly wooded shores, where many 
friendly lights gleamed among the trees. My ears were suddenly smit- 
ten with a multitude of sounds containing a scale of notes unknown 



112 



to Slavonic experience. I veered my yacht landward, and as it ap- 
proached the beach, across the far end of an avenue, I saw a great 
procession pass. The musical instruments I could not recognize, but 
the music was such as our great masters would compose to be played 
in the ante-chamber of Hades, for the maddening of enthralled spirits. 
The guns which the soldiers carried had no stocks, ana! in place of 
bayonets there were flames of fire. I never became quite certain 
whether these western warriors gored their enemies or burned them 
to death. The leader of the host, I learned, bore the name, Echlin, 
which means, " Invincible." He was widely known in those parts as 
an able and accomplished strategist. 

Where the forest grew denser, suddenly a mighty fire broke forth. 
It swelled high in flames, licked the leaves from the woods and snap- 
ped at the stars in its anger. It reminded me of the time when Rome 
blazed, that Nero might see to tune his fiddle, or when our queenly 
Moscow lighted up the midnight skies. In the background rose a vast 
structure piled in rugged limestone, into towers and pinnacles. It was 
admired for its architectural graces, and was called a College, which 
name I can find no word in my native tongue adequate to translate. 
From what I afterward saw and heard, it must have heen a prison of 
some sort. It appeared that there were keepers within it who admin- 
istered to its inmates a multifarious and indigestible regimen in which 
signs, and even logs, were sometimes the astounding constituents. One 
named Trigonometricus was particularly hateful. The chief object 
of his tyranny was a tribe called the Freshmen (what the prefix Fresh 
means I never could ascertain), who but lately came under subjection. 
But although untutored, they w r ere a strong and valorous people, and 
rebelled, slew the captor one day, in the holy place of prayers, and, 
when night came, followed the corpse, as it was borne before them 
through the streets of the city. There was great joy that the tyrant 
was no more. 

Around the fire gathered the consolidated armies of the Freshmen, 
out from the divided ranks came the bier, supported by four giant sol- 
diers under the direction of head-pall-bearer Thompson. Beneath 
the weird, fitful light of the fire, the coffin was laid on the ground, 
the vast assembly of soldiers, musicians, merchants, bondholders, 
Townies, Preps, Bibs and Profs, was hushed to the silence of death, 
and an orator arose in the midst of them. In passionate tones he 
recounted the misdeeds and errant life of the departed. (It was evi- 
dent that whatever was the attitude of many men among the rebels, 
between the orator and the deceased there never had existed a surplus 
of love and esteem). 

Now it happened that there was another tribe in that land called 
Sophs. They were an uncertain, wily class of men, and had leagued 

113 



themselves together, and to His Satanic Majesty the Devil, to make a 
diversion in behalf of their old friend Trigonometricus. They 
opened bombardment upon the Freshmen in a strange and marvelous 
manner. The projectile which they used was of a character which 1 
have never seen employed by any other class of men, and is worth} 
of note. The shell was an elongated spheroid with a calcareous in 
crustation, and filled with a gelatinous substance of marvelous potency. 
Furthermore, they were fired in curves, differing from any species of 
conic section yet discovered, and did great execution. The orator 
abbreviated his speech, the mortal remains of the deceased were con- 
signed to the raging flames, and a united movement made upon the 
Sophs. Then there was rushing to and fro and hurrying in hot haste. 
All through the night footfalls were heard on the pavements, as pur- 
suers and pursued measured the dimensions of the city in linear miles. 
In the morning, from the sunny distance, I looked back over the sea, 
saw a flourish of bifurcated garments and pedal extremities above the 
water near the beach, saw a great crowd, saw a plunging into the tide, 
heard a mighty shouting, and saw a portion of the Soph army creep 
forth from the deep, with the dejected mien of a feathered biped out 
in the rain. I have since read in American papers that the Freshmen 
adopted tjiis method of soaking the Sophs to eliminate some of their 
" cussedness " by the laws of displacement. (See illustration, p. 14). 

And I steered away from that coast, and never saw it more. If 
these facts are of any value to the science of ethnology, or to the art 
of modern warfare, I gladly submit them to the scientific world. 

Your devoted servant, 

Ivan Kalinkoff. 




114 



A Botanizing Episode 




SOPHOMORE had drunk his fill, 
Where danced the sun on Michigan's rill, 
And taken twice his oatmeal mush, 
And swallowed coffee with a rush ; 
For on this fairest morn in May, — 
For him a most eventful day, — 
A search for flowers he was to take 
Along the limpid, liquid lake, 
And needed much good nourishment 
To strengthen for the great event. 
A most retiring man was he, 
Quite shy of lady's company, 
And fast and loud his heart did beat, 
Rich mantling with the blood his cheek, 
When to his mind the thought he'd call, 
That with a girl from Fem-Sem hall 
He'd make the trip to-day abroad, 
To search for flowers by Sylvan road. 
Our Sophomore, — let's call him Jones, — 
And the fair girl with whom he roams, 
As nothing better can be found, 
We'll dub with classic name of Brown, — 
We'll leave till pleasant start he's made, 
And walks through pleasant shady glades. 
The flowers in clusters grew around, 
By pathway's side, and streamlet found, 
Which, murmuring to the lakeside, ran, — 
And soon was filled their Botany can. 
Through bramble bushes now they wend, 
And now through paths where willows bend, 
And hide from the observer's eye 
The blue vault of the o'erhanging sky ; 
And now through farmers' lands they wind, 
And over barb-wire fences climb'd, 
Which calm-eyed kine and sheep enclose, 
Not to speak of — Miss Brown's clothes. 

115 



At last they came, where, bright and clear, 

A little pond to sight appears, 

In the midst of which there grew 

Some water crowfoot in full view. 

O, what beautiful flowers there grow ! 

O, how I'd like to have them so ! " 

Thus spoke Miss Brown, and off went Jones, 

A cold chill striking through his bones, 

To see if something could be found, 

Wherewith to bridge the little pond. 

A farm-house near he soon espied, 

And, when from out the barn he tried 

To fake a scantling, long and narrow, 

A bull-dog came around the corner. 

Now Jones was brave as knights of old, 

But at this sight his blood ran cold ; 

For on many a moonless summer night, 

A brute like this had held him tight, 

Till the owner of the melons came, 

And drubbed him with a willow cane. 

But now by desperation fed, 

He nailed that brute upon the head, 

And felled him flat upon the ground ; 

Then upon his heel turned round, 

And dragged the scantling to the pond, 

Where waiting for him was Miss Brown. 

The miniature lake from shore to shore, 

With narrow bridge he spanned o'er, 

On which he stepped with trembling feet, 

The coveted crowfoot flowers to seek. 

And now he in the middle stands, 

And, bending, reaches both his hands 

Beneath the waves the flowers to search, 

When lo ! he falls from off his perch ! 

Sinks for a moment 'neath the water ; 

Appears again a moment later, 

And meets, with ill-concealed wrath, 

His fair companion's merry laugh. 



116 



enior 



e 



ration on*J-ram[et. 




AMLET is a tragedy written by Mr. William Shakespeare, 
as a play for the stage, and as a subject fdr senior ora- 
tions. It may be well to state now, that it is the latter 
which we are about to do. This play, next to " She " 
and the "Arabian Nights," has received the most atten- 
tion from the public of any of this wonderful author's productions. 
While not having as much plot or literary merit as the above named, 
it is peculiarly interesting on account of the originality displayed in its 
characters and its promiscuous blood-spilling. Before one can fully 
appreciate the plot, it is necessary to have clearly in mind the relation- 
ship of the principal characters, as it is in this that the beauty of the 
play exists. The chief character is Hamlet, who was named by his 
mother in honor of the play by that name, which had just made its 
appearance, and was attracting a great deal of attention at that time. 
He was the oldest boy in a family of one. His father and mother 
were the King and Queen of Denmark. Their reign was a happy one, 
and they dwelt together in peace — never dreaming that marriage was 
a failure. But their peaceful home was broken up, and a mantle of 
sorrow was thrown over that once happy and united family, when Ham- 
let's uncle decides to discard the king, take up the queen and play it 
alone. Here the trouble begins ; and it is around this that the plot 
thickens. By this act the uncle becomes Hamlet's father, his mother 
becomes his aunt, he becomes his own first cousin, his father becomes 
a ghost — and as one of the seniors so pathetically expressed it — Ham- 
let is the son of his mother. This serious and sudden change of affairs 
so works upon the mind of our young prince that he goes crazy, and in 
a moment oi extreme mental aberration, he falls in love with a pretty 
girl named Ophelia. His madness seems to have been of a peculiarly 
contagious character, for the above named young lady also becomes 
affected with the same symptoms, and commits suicide by drowning 
herself in tears over her misfortunes. Hamlet possessed a very sensa- 
tive and imaginative nature, which was oftentimes beset by strange 
hallucinations. Once, while talking with his mother, he hears a noise 
behind a curtain, mistaking the sound he yells rats, and makes a pass 
at them, and stabs Ophelia's pa " through the arras," which is probably 

117 



the Danish word for heart, as the wound proves fatal, and the old man 
dies and descends to the lower regions (under the stage, to change his 
clothing and smoke cigarettes), while Hamlet proceeds to kill off the 
rest of the characters. 

It has been asserted by many unobserving students of this play, 
that Hamlet and his parents were of Danish descent ; but, after a 
careful study of the same, we have concluded that this cannot be. 
We base our opinion on the remark made by Hamlet when he finds 
his uncle-step-father trying to pray, but with poor success. His 
sympathetic nature is deeply touched, and, calling the old man by that 
endearing name with which he was wont to address him, he offers his 
services by saying, " Now, might I do it, Pat? " which settles, beyond 
a doubt, his nationality. His uncle decides that on account of the ill- 
ness of Hamlet's health, he had better take advantage of a cut in rates 
to visit their old homestead in the mother country, and so buys a 
scalper's ticket to England and starts him off. On his way over Ham- 
let becomes home-sick and sea-sick, and decides to throw up the journey, 
as well as everything else of which he has undertaken or partaken, and 
returns home by a boat he meets on the way. He gets back in time 
to attend Ophelia's funeral, where he announces his great love for her 
by saying, that should they pile mountains on mountains over him, they 
could not mash him as she had done. This makes her brother Laertes 
mad, and he challenges Hamlet to a fight with rapiers. When the fight 
comes off the king bets two to one on Hamlet against the field. Ham- 
let makes a very palpable base hit, but dies on second. While play- 
ing with the weapons, Hamlet, not knowing they were loaded, acci- 
dentally kills all the principal characters on the stage, with the excep- 
tion of a few of the supes. This accident brings the play to an 
untimely end, just as it gets to the most interesting part, where young 
Fortinbras comes on the stage with his standing army of ten or a dozen 
warriors, who have just been fighting the enemy in the back alley, 
and are now drawing a salary of twenty-five cents a performance. 




118 




cftoof 




[Tenderly dedicated to T. C. H.] 



Listen, my children, and you shall hear 

Of the terrible things the maidens fear 

In the Fem. Sem. hall, in '88. 

Hardly a girl remains of late 

Who remembers that once Miss Jane ruled here. 

She said to her friend, "If a girl comes down 

After study hours, to prowl around, 

Just report to me, and the luckless wight, — 

Be she innocent Prep or Senior bright, — 

Will hold herself the most wretched sinner, 

When at the close of next day's dinner, 

Without a doubt as to the winner, 

She is commanded to give explanations 

For her unlawful peregrinations." 

But the last of those frightful days is gone, 
And to us, who live in the blessed dawn 
Of this reign of freedom and self-control, 
It seems that the girls of the present age, 
Although not imprisoned within a cage, 
Have not endangered their goodness of soul. 

Still the sweet-tempered girls of the place 

Meet, as they go through the Fem. Sem. hall, 

Terrible odors, which almost appall 

The hungriest girl as she thinks of fish 

And hash and cabbage, with sorry face, 

Going reluctant at dinner call 

Down to carrots, of all the worst dish. 

119 



And besides these dinners that try one's soul 

(Although we pay a good price on the whole), 

Terrible stairs, nights one, two and three 

(If any one doubt, let him come and see), 

Oft weary us maidens young and gay, 

And make us hope in some better day 

The elevator will grief allay, 

And we know our friends will be filled with joy, 

Who have pledged themselves for 'vator boy. 

But, oh, the noise that assails your ears ! 

No matter whether up or down, 

In room or hall-way, you can but frown 

At the music, — 'twould melt a mummy to tears. 

With twenty pianos, all hours of the day, 

Thumped by maidens, nor happy nor gay, 

Bach, Czerny, Clementi, and others as well, 

Are murdered e'en hourly, sad, sad 'tis to tell. 

And when'to escape the clamor and din, 

You climb to the attic, seclusion to win, 

Oh, vain are your hopes, for there you still find, 

Borne up, as by magic, to torture your mind, 

The screech of the screecher who screeches like sin. 



Methinks that some gray November morn, 

A youth, all home-sick and forlorn, 

May find himself, against his will, 

Threading these halls so dark and still 

That he could hear, like a sentinel's tread, 

The watchful night-wind overhead. 

But suddenly all his thoughts he bends 

On a ghostly cry which the silence rends ; 

For forth there comes, — from the very wall, 

As it seemed to him, — a frightful call, 

Help me, Cassius, or I sink ! " 

Then, ere the youth has time to blink, 

E'en as a maniac who raves, 

Comes, " Stand ! the ground's your own, my brave 

But at the word there assails his ear 
A clanging and banging, wild and drear, 
Far worse than the fog-horn, of whose wail 
You've doubtless heard full many a tale ; 

120 



And through the dimness of the hall 
He sees approach a figure tall, 
Swinging free the harsh-toned bell, 
Whose rasping notes we know full well. 
Straight up the stairs for escape he flies ; 
But the dusky figure still pursues, 
Causing the youth his wits to lose. 
He mounts till he the house-top wins, 
Then stopping not for thoughts of sins, 
He hastens upward toward the skies. 

But scores of tales we might unfold, 
Which have transpired in days of old, 
Or with prophetic eye might see 
Full many a scene which is to be. 
But, oh, the midnight oil burns low, 
And you were wearied long ago. 




121 



A College Reminiscence. 



UCH mystery has clustered about the founding of the 
Alpha Sigma Sigma Society, and frequent attempts have 
been made by the vulgus to tear away the veil of mys- 
tery, but the plot thickens with each attempt, and will 
not unravel. The facts in the case are these : 
It was in March 18 — that a swarthy son of Antioch, Syria, by the 
name of Taminosian, was possessed with a burning desire to become 
a member of some secret fraternity. Tarn — for by that abbreviated 
name he was better known — confided the secret which was swelling 
in his bosom to a good brother bib, who happened to be a member in 
good and honorable standing of one of the secret societies. This brother 
had a satellite, also a bib, but a member of another frat, and to him 
Tarn and his burning desire were referred. Tarn was not particular 
which of the two societies he joined, indeed, he had no objection to 
joining both. However, that could not well be permitted ; but there 
was a way out of the difficulty. These good bibs, to whom Tarn had 
intrusted his secret, laid the application of the Syrian before their 
respective chapters, and plans were immediately inaugurated for the 
accommodation of the brother, and the satisfaction of his burning 
desire. The members of these two societies met by agreement, and 
formally organized the A 2 2 Society for Tarn's special benefit. 
Then a good wide-awake committee, with muscles of iron and hearts 
of flint, were instructed to go to Heck Hall and " bid " the man, and 
have him ready for initiation on a certain evening. The committee 
put on its war paint and masks, and went forth to do mighty work, as 
did their sires at old Thermopylae. They went to Heck Hall, but Tarn 
had gone to bed and could not be seen. They then slipped a note 
under the door, and made an appointment to meet him on the lake 
shore, near the lighthouse, the next day, at one o'clock. Long before 
that hour Tarn was marking footsteps on the sands. The committee 
were on the ground at the appointed time, their faces disguised and 
expectations running high. Tarn turned to the North at their com- 
mand and suffered himself to be blindfolded. Then the committee 
put him through a course of sprouts and warned him after the manner 
of the White Caps. Tarn did not keep them in suspense long, but ac- 
cepted their "bid " without a question, for he had thought the matter 

122 



over carefully, and had long since decided which frat he would enter. 
He was profuse in his expressions of gratitude, and promised to meet 
the committee at the same place two nights later, to be initiated into 
Alpha Sigma Sigma. The committee then turned him toward the 
South, took the bandage from his eyes, and ordered him to " go hence " 
and not to look back, else he would be turned into a pillar of salt, as 
was Lot's wife. Tarn headed for Heck Hall, crossed the Rubicon, and 
never looked back. 

Meanwhile, the members of the new frat were active. A meeting 
was held on Sunday afternoon in a deserted place, and arrangements 
were made for the initiation. Committees of various kinds were 
appointed, and all the brothers swore by the nine gods to do all they 
could to make it pleasant for the initiate on that occasion. The night 
of the initiation was an ideal night ; a better could not have been made 
to order. The night, and certain incidents connected therewith, have 
been thus described : 

On a dark and stormy March night, 
On a night while rain was pouring, 
On a night 'mid thunder's roaring, 
On a night 'mid lightning's flashing, 
Tarn, the hopeful, Tarn, the joyful, 
With his heart with joy a- bursting, — 
Bursting like a Kansas pumpkin 
Rolling down a rocky hillside, — 
Tarn, full at the appointed second, 
Like a champing steed, impatient, 
Waited at the place of trysting. 
Soon from out the darkness thickening, 
Soon from out the thunder's roaring, 
Soon from out the lightning's flashing 
Came a black and gloomy carriage, 
Carriage drawn by steeds of blackness, 
Carriage driven by one of Ham's sons. 
Tarn, right on the invitation, 
Blithely stepped into the carriage, 
Stepped into the darkened carriage, 
Sat beside a brawny senior, 
Sat before a mighty junior, 
Valiant sons of Alpha Sigma. 
With a bang the carriage-door sla-mmed, 
With a jump the horses started, 
Started on an awful journey ; 
Flew like spectres through the darkness. 

123 



Down the road the coal black steeds ran, 

Ran down one street, up another, 

Ran across the bounding prairie, 

To the confines of the " big woods," 

To the home of snake and June bug ; 

Past the farm-house and the brick-yard, 

Past the dwelling of the Swedemen ; 

Stopped not for the bark of bull-dog, 

Stopped not for the yell of farmer, 

Stopped not for the hoot of night-owl. 

Still the black steeds sweating, snorting, 

Plunged along through mud and darkness, 

Through the forest, over prairie, 

Like an awful cyclone went they. 

Tarn, his sight dimmed by a bandage, 

Knew not whither he was going, 

Knew not, that, 'mid pelting rainstorm, 

'Mid the lightnings and the thunders, 

Alpha Sigma Sigma brothers 

All were gathering at the trysting 

Place for Tarn's initiation. 

From the club and from the hash-house, 

From the Lime Kiln — from th' Asylum, 

From the well known Bryant manger, 

From the great Hotel de Jaycox, 

Happy, jolly, after supper, 

All the Alpha Sigma brethren, 

Through the mud and through the darkness, 

Through the rain and through the dampness, 

Through the thunders and the lightnings, 

Dodging now a lynx-eyed "copper," 

Hiding now within a shadow, 

At the place appointed gathered. 

Some came laden with bananas, 

Some brought milk and some brought cider, 

Some lugged bags of nuts and fried-cakes. 

Some were with big wine-saps laden, 

Some with biscuits, some with mince-pies, 

Others, too, brought ropes and pulleys, 

Bones, and grinning skulls of dead men ; 

Some brought Greek fire, some brought Jews' harps. 

There were coffins and tarpaulins, 

Ice and stencils and fly-paper, 

Branding irons, cruel thumb screws, 

124 



Racks, and tools of inquisition. 

And amid the tools of torture, 

Gazing on with look of pleasure, 

Smiling grimly, all impatient, 

Yet with proud and bold demeanor, 

Conscious of his own importance, 

Strong, defiant as Gibraltar, 

Stood the goat of Alpha Sigma. 

Mighty was he ; awful butter ; 

He the Sullivan of goats was ; 

Old he was, and gray his whiskers, 

Through them oft the winds did whistle ; 

Hero of a thousand wrestlings 

With th' initiates' troubled spirit. 

Now the place of sacrificing 

Victims to the wrathful Pluto, 

Far removed from scent of " coppers,'' 

Far removed from gaze of vulgus, 

Admirably to the purpose 

Of the order was adapted. 

One large room with two adjoining, 

Where impatient dwelt his goatship ; 

And a platform for the purpose 

Of a sacrificial altar ; 

And a high and vaulted ceiling 

With great rafters, suited to the 

Sudden swinging of the victim 

O'er the burning mouth of Sheol ; 

And the walls were hung with tablets, 

And with trinkets of the victims 

Who had passed the dread ordeal, 

'Scaped the dreadful wrath of Pluto, 

'Scaped the goat, the mighty butter. 

Now assembled all the brothers 

In the hall of Alpha Sigma, 

Traded coats, and changed their head-gear, 

And with weird masks hid their faces ; 

Barred the windows, pulled the shades down, 

Tried the instruments of torture, 

Got the ice and stencils ready, 

Threw a rope across the rafter, 

Opened sheets of nice fly-paper, 

Opened parcels of calves' liver, 

Liver full of blood and odor, — 

125 



( )<lor not like that of roses, — 

But like skunk for size and color. 

All was ready for the victim \ 

Bath-tub, blanket, rope, molasses, 

Greek-fire, skulls, spare-ribs and shin-bones, 

Trade-mark, lamp-black, hair and bug-juice. 

All the brothers were in waiting, 

All was ready for the slaughter 

Of the princely Syrian victim, 

For the immolation of the 

Lusty " bib " upon the altar 

Of the God of Alpha Sigma. 

But the brothers did not have long to wait, for soon the committee 
and their victim stood at the door and gave the raps for admission 
The door flew open and they entered the hall. Tarn's " eyes were 
holden that he might not see," and so they remained throughout the 
evening. The candidate was received in silence, marched around the 
hall several times, and then conducted to the platform, where the oath 
was administered ; then followed a few of the " further mysteries of the 
order," in the administering of which Tarn behaved beautifully. It 
was unfortunate that the tarpaulin was rotten, and let the victim through , 
when the brothers preferred to have him tossed to the ceiling ; but Tarn 
did not mind a little thing like that. He even enjoyed the external 
applications of ice and fly-paper, and stencil and liver, and it was gen- 
uine fun to him to be hoisted to the skies by the rope, and he seemed 
to grow fatter after each Icarian fall. When called upon to give some 
exhibition of his proficiency as a lecturer, he was pleased to favor the 
brothers with his own inimitable rendition of the Mohammedan call 
to prayer, as he had often heard it from the minarets of Antioch. The 
initiation into the further mysteries continued indefinitely, subject 
to the pleasure and ingenuity of the brothers, and many things were 
done which Tam prefers to keep sub rosa. The formal initiation was 
concluded with the giving of the "charge," the signs of recognition 
and distress, the grip and the password, which latter was log sin y 2 
A 2 2 = log (s— t) + log (s— a)— log m 

2 

Then after all the brothers had been introduced to the " Assyrian 
baby," who, of course, was still blindfolded, he was led like a lamb (or 
black sheep) to the slaughter, and placed in an ante-room, while the 
sovereigns, princes and rulers of Alpha Sigma Sigma fared sumptu- 
ously in the banqueting hall, on the various indigestibles provided for 
the occasion. Tam was well fed, however, with pies, cakes, fruits, 
doughnuts, etc., and well watered with milk and cider, straight and 
mixed, bug-juice, etc. After the banquet, speech-making was in order, 

126 



and Tarn came forth from his retirement to make his maiden frat speech, 
in which with much emotion he expressed the pleasure it gave him 
to be a member of so noble and mighty a society as A 2 2 ; he had 
long desired membership in such an association ; now his highest 
ambition was realized, and his future was assured ; he would endeavor 
to be a true and loyal brother of A 2 2, and to bring honor to her 
name. The speech was cheered until the rafters rung with the racket 
thereof. Letters of regret were read by the secretary from Dr. Cum- 
ings, Dr. Bennett, and other prominent members of the order, com- 
plimenting the society upon securing such a valuable member as Tarn 
would undoubtedly prove to be. Brother Bennett kindly invited the 
brothers, and especially Tarn, to dinner at his house at one o'clock the 
next day. After the reading of the letters, Tarn was permitted to 
depart, after he had been informed that he would receive the second 
degree in six months, provided he took a bath regularly, paid his 
laundry bills, quit calling at the Fern. Sem., and lived up to his oath. 
All this he faithfully promised. The committee then took him in 
charge, hustled him into the waiting carriage, and dropped him on the 
Campus near Heck Hall. The next day he met Dr. Bennett, gave him 
the grip, and surprised the doctor by accepting his invitation to din- 
ner. The doctor tried to disabuse the mind of the gullible Syrian, 
and aroused his suspicions. For a week Tarn paraded the streets, giving 
the signs of recognition and distress, but no brother of Alpha Sigma 
Sigma came to the rescue. He finally came to the conclusion that he 
was "in the soup." 







127 




(2e^ j^k 



[See Illustration, page 22.} 




HARGE, charge !" the captain cried, 
When thro' the crowd he spied 
Hosts of the Freshmen wide, 

Drawn on the campus. 
" Mind not their bearing proud, 
Heed not their vaunting loud, 
Scorn the o'erwhelming crowd, 
Numbers ne'er daunt us." 

Then, when the tones were heard, 
On at the signal word, 
Swift as the ocean bird, 

Swept the Soph legion. 
Back fell the multitude 
Awed by their savage mood, 
As if a portent rude 

Hushed the whole region. 

In a dense phalanx blocked, 
Each to his fellow locked, 
Earth with their moving rocked, 

Trembled and thundered. 
Great was the deed they dared, 
All the dread silence shared, 
Bibs and professors stared, 

Marvelled and wondered. 

They fell like a sounding clod, — 
Prone on the oozing sod, 
Each like a demi-god, 

Grappled and tussled. 
Fearing the vict'ry lost, 
Then all the Freshman host 
Battled at any cost, — 

Believe me, they hustled. 

128 



Oh ! the brave deeds they did 
Under the Freshies hid, 
Quick of their masses rid, 

How they charged wildly ! 
But did e'er the sun, 
See a great vict'ry won, 
Men fighting five to one ? — 

Putting it mildly. 

Of Henry and Ridgway long, 
How they broke swift and strong, 
Shall ring in the battle song, 

Valiant and eager. 
Sires shall to sons repeat, 
Glowing in ardor meet, 
Many a daring feat 

Done there by Fleager. 

Oh, the bold fight they made ! 
Ne'er shall their glory fade, 
Not until Pluto's shade 

Brightens to glory. 
How on the hordes they fell, 
Moved by its mighty spell, 
Class unto class shall tell, 

Ever the story. 




129 




JJeclaination Contest. 



-*^f nil|ll|ll|M|lHlHlHlHl!|iHH|i;|i:i $£-■ 

HAVE been asked by a few of my friends to explain why I 
was so unwilling to allow my name to appear among the 
candidates for next year's Declamation contest, and I 
will try to do so in as few words as possible. 

It is New Year's eve in old First Church. That 
great mass of stone stands silent under the stars ; there is heard only 
the restless moving and gentle whispering of the vines clinging closely 
to its time-stained walls. Its deep shadow rests upon a snowless 
world. 

The old year is passing quietly away, and within the chapel ot 
the Church, a few good Methodists are gathered round to see him die, 
and to wipe off the chin of the infant New Year. 

In my strolls I had, somehow, happened on this quiet company 
of worshipers, but, although seated in their midst, I could only regard 
them as actors in some dream drama. 

Finally, impelled by some restless impulse, I rise and wander up 
the stairs, until I find myself in the vast auditorium above. How 
solemn is the stillness of the old room, and what a contrast it presents 
to the scene of each Sabbath morning, when silks are rustling up the 
aisle, and wealthy pew owners take their places at beck of obsequious 
ushers. Now all is in solemn and stately repose. Here and there a 
ray of moonlight struggles through the stained windows, and faintly 
suggests the outlines of lifeless forms. The great rim of the gallery, 
sweeping round the entire room, seems like an immense grin on the 
face of night, as though some hideous joke were already being perpe- 
trated. Suddenly the college clock, with ponderous tone, proclaimed 
the hour of twelve. The last stroke had hardly died away before I 
became conscious that there was a great transformation being effected 
all about me. Shadowy forms were entering at the open door and 
passing in perfect silence up the aisles. The great organ behind the 
pulpit began to sound a wierd and mournful funeral dirge. I turned 
about to see if the fair co-eds were in their accustomed place in the 
gallery loft and flirting with the Preps and Bibs across the way, when 
the strangest sight met my gaze. 

130 



Perched upon the gallery's rim just opposite the pulpit-stand, 
there sat a little, spindle-legged man, with smooth face and bald head. 
His body was like that of a wasp ; his spidery legs were interlocked ; 
his hands were clasped about his shins like long fibrous roots ; his 
head was held between his knees, and his luminous eyes were fixed 
upon me. His skin was smooth and glossy on his bullet-shaped head, 
and of the appearance of tanned leather, over which a bluish-green 

phosphorescent light was dim- 
ly shed. 

I shuddered at sight of 
him and turned to go, but he 
motioned me to remain, 
and presently one end of 
an object resembling 
a rope appeared over 
the edge of the gallery, 
and after a moment's 
delay slid down to 
within reach of me. It 
was the creature's tail. 
I looked at it in hor- 
ror. The tip was beck- 
oning to me. I could 
not resist, and with a blending 
of fear and loathing I grasped 
the snaky thing and climbed hand 
over hand to the ledge. As I was 
climbing up, the room seemed quiver- 
ing with silent, derisive laughter, but as I 
became seated this sensation passed away, 
and I became conscious that the strange being 
at my side was speaking. " Behold in me," it said, 
the presiding genius of all declamation contests. I 
am the one that superintends the choice of speakers, 
and leads them on with delusive dreams of success, to bawl at the 
echoes until they get the quinsy. I am the one that offers sinister sug- 
gestions to the music committee, as it is my greatest delight to see a 
cultured audience writhe and weep under the inflictions of the average 
contest musician. I am the one that selects the judges, and that 
warps their brains so that they think the poorest speaker the best, 
and the best the poorest, and I fairly shriek with laughter as I see the 
bitter rage or despair that surges in the souls of the defeated ones. 

But on every New Year's night I am met with retribution terrible, 
for from 12 to 1, I am compelled to sit in this place and hear the 

131 




shades of disappointed candidates struggle for the right to bellow 
forth their time-old chestnuts. Listen, and you will hear sentences 
long familiar to your ears, for you must know that those pieces that 
have been spoken the greatest number of times 
have the greatest echoes, and are consequently, 
the easiest to be distinguished — " While he was 
speaking, there had been a constantly increasing 
commotion in the direction of the organ loft, which 
now culminated in a terrible explosion — " I will be 
first j let me go ! ' Give me liberty, or give me 
Death !' " The last word had a jostled sound, as 
though the voice had been kicked off the platform; 
and then there was a moment's pause. 

"Now," murmured the imp, " comes a drop 
of balm on my rasped ear-drum ; they are mak- 
ing way for — " A sweet voice interrupted him 
with these musical words : 




" He does not love me for my birth, 
Nor for my lands so broad and fair ; 

He loves me for my own true worth, 
And that is well," said Lady Clare. 



The voice was low and gentle. It had floated up into a secluded 
nook some years ago, and had never been added 
to. For this reason, and for its many graces, it 
was a great favorite, and, as a special sign of 
honor, the voices that, from year to year, were 
clothed in words that had not been uttered 
there before, might escort her to the platform. 
All of this I gathered from the mutterings 
of the imp, and also, that on 
this occasion the honor fell 
to the " Royal Archer." 

And now was heard a 
perfect bedlam of sound. 
An egotistical bellow, born 

of many years of declamation contests, came tramp- 
ing on the very heels of Lady Clare with " Lars 
Porsena of Clusium, by the nine gods he swore." 
One voice, as blind as a bat, was heard to 
shriek through toothless gums ; 

" 'Tis thus I rend thy tyrant's chains 
And fling him back a boy's disdain !" 





132 



'•'Oh come off! it's my turn now," and the arches of the ceilin^ 
echoed to the plaintive wail of " Liberty AND union, 
now and forever, one and inseparable." 

Thus the time wore on. Shades of Cumnock's 
reader, what a time ! Once a ripple of gurgling 

laughter swelled up from 
the pews as a portion of 
the struggling heap of 
blackness seemed to leap 
in an aesthetic and digni- 
fied fashion across the 
platform, and a voice was 
heard exclaiming: : 





" I was not born of a woman 
But on a mountain at night, from an oak tree 

riven by lightning. 
Forth I sprang at a bound with all my weapons 

about me." 

It was a night long to be remembered. 
L -^sfe~ Long before the clock struck one, my dizzy 
~ S ^-"° r ~Z^- ~^ brain refused to suffer longer. The last words 

-~ - that I heard as I sank backward in a swoon, 

were hissed at me in a tragic stage whisper : " My gentle lad. remem- 
ber this was nothing but a dream." 

'Twas New Year's morning when I awoke and found myself lying 
at full length in the middle aisle of the old First Church, and as I 
wended my way to the club for breakfast, it was with a firm resolve 
never to take part in a declamation contest while the remembrance of 
that night's horrors should remain with me. 




133 



Typical School Day at M. W. I '. 



ACT I. Scene I. Place — room of the boys. Time — seven o'clock in 
the morning. Fire out ; thermometer io° below o. Alarm clock, 
which was set to go off at 5.30, begins to hum to the tune the old cow 
died on: 

A bright morning smiles as lovely as a rose ; 
The student dreams on in quiet repose ; 
There hears he the voices 
Of friends far away, 
And with them he visits 
In fancy to-day. 
But as he awakens from his pleasant dream, 
And sighs because things are not as they seem, 
He starts when he sees that 
The hour is so late, 
For in German with Baird 
He recites at eight. 

Upson Downes {awaking, and apostrophizing the clock. Air, " The 

* ' You miserable little thing ! 

How I hate your saucy ring ! 
Each morning from King 
Morpheus' arms 

You call me with your vain alarms. 
[Looks at Gusher still sleeping^ 

There's Gusher there, you'd never wake 

No matter how much pains you'd take. 

He'd still sleep on, and never stir 

If Resurrection morn were here. [Shaking Ananias.^ 

Awake ! awake ! old man, awake ! 

We must arise, or we'll be late. 

An eight o'clock we've got, you know, 

And promptly to our hash must go. 

Ananias (awaking). You kick precisely like a mule. 
Oh my ! how can you be so cruel, 
To wake me from such pleasant dreams, 
To such unpleasant real scenes ? 
I was dreaming of a lady fair, 
With sunny face and golden hair ; 

134 



oooccoooooooooooooooooococoooo 



A 



TYPICAL DAY + 



-AT -• 

Northwestern 



AN OPERETTA 



— :in: 



III ACTS. 



oooooooooooooooooccoooocooooo o 



UPSON DO WNES. A Tall, Dyspeptic Student. 

ANANIAS GUSHER. A Short, Fat, Sentimental Student. 

MISS S QUACK. A Fair Co-ed. 

CHORUS. Students, Members of Faculty, Preps, Bibs and 
Townies. 

PROMPTER. His Sala?iic Majesty. 



She smiled on me, and such good luck — {Upson, at this 
point, crawls out of bed and pulls all the bed-clothes with him.] 

Upson. O, chestnuts ! Gusher, do get up ! 
You're always dreaming of ladies fair, 
With sunny face and golden hair {looking at the stove], 
Your fire is out, and serves you right, 
For you forgot the coal last night. 

[Ananias now arises, and both proceed to dress with all due alacrity. Ananias, after 
he has finished dressing, makes the fire. Upson sings in the meantime. Tune, 
" Dashing through the Snow."] 

Upson. O let the cold winds blow, 

We'll never mind a whit, 
Our fire will brighter glow, 
And by it we will sit. 
We'll make the welkin ring, 
In songs of joy and mirth ; 
And while we by our fireside sing, 
No happier men there are on earth. 

I They now set out for their boarding-house, where they arrive at about 7:30 0^ clock. 
On entering, they are greeted with the following] 

First Boy. Hey, there ! perhaps you know the breakfast time 

Is thirty minutes past the hour of seven. 

Methinks that too late hours you kept last night, 

While visiting Fem-Sem hall. 
Second Boy. This I have 

Every reason in the world to doubt. 

I know too well these lads' propensities. 

I think that I can say with certainty 

Of right, that to the city yesternight, 

Upson and Gusher there did pay a visit. 

Ananias and Upson (together). Your opinions all are wrong. 
We studied last night, hard and long ; 
The oil past midnight's hour we burned 
And faithfully our lessons learned. 

[Enter waiter who sings ; variation to the tune the old cow died on\ 

Oh, tardy one, farewell ! 

Your breakfast is cold. 

Be free to help yourself 

To what you behold. 
The clock is already striking the hour 
And Baird will soon have us under his power. 
In German, a dozen pages or more, 
Is sure to flunk us Sophies by the score. 

135 



Oh, tardy one, farewell ! 
The roll will be called, 
And by Baird o'er the coals 
You'll surely be hauled. 

[ Those at the table gradually take their departure. Upson and Ananias are the only 
ones left. After rushing through the meal they hurry to the college, and, on arriv- 
ing, find that the clock registers 8:20. They stop by the wayside. ] 

Ananias. Ye gods ! Upson, we're late again, 
My heart it gives an awful pain 
To think of entering the class, 
When nearly half the time is past. 

Upson. I guess you're right on that, old fel.j 
But what can we to Bobbie tell, 
When he his scorching words turns loose, 
And asks us for a good excuse. 

Ananias. I could not say. At any rate 
There is no doubt that we're too late, 
And that it's cold ; so let's away, 
Nor longer here debating stay. 

Upson. Agreed ; we'll straightway homeward go, 

And frame excuse for " Uncle Joe." [Exit singing.'] 

( Tune ' ' Serenade : Hit ttelein . " ) 

Now, ho ! ho ! 

We'll homeward go 
And pass the time in pleasure sweet ; 

We'll quiet be 

Nor let them see, 
How o'er our heads the hours fleet. 
And when the noon-day clock is beating, 
And all in chapel hall are meeting, 
With accents loud each comrade greeting, 
Then we'll join the happy throng, 

And help along 

The pleasant song. 

So then, away ! 

We will not stay, 
And waste the merry hours, to-day. 



136 



Scene 2. A students room. Enter Ananias, solus ; slowly and p n- 
sively looks around, finds his room all right ; slowly divests hi?nself of 
overcoat and hat, then sings: 

(Tune, " The Blue Alsatian Mountains.' 1 '') 
I have asked a fair-haired maiden, — 

She's a Freshman, so they say, — 
If the books with which she's laden, 

I might carry on the way, 

I might carry on the way. 

But she looked at me with scorning, 

And her eyes with fire did snap, 
As she answered, " Not this morning," — 

Oh ! that maiden's scornful laugh ! 

Oh, no ! Oh, no ! Oh, no ! 

She couldn't quite see the way, 
For she'd promised " Ups " that morning, 

That her books were his that day. 

Oh, no ! Oh, no ! Oh, no ! 

She couldn't quite see the way, 
For she'd promised " Ups " that morning, 

That her books were his that day. 

Gusher {soliloquizing). And thus in coming from the University 
Did Upson Downes my efforts blast, to be 
Gallant. And it was ever thus with me. 

[Enter Do'vnes in a hurry; throws his overcoat and hat in confusion on the bed.~\ 

Downes. Well, Gush, 'tis sad to see your frantic ways 

And fruitless efforts to escort the fair. [Sings to the tune of 

" Blue Bottles."] 
Oh, do not be down-hearted, 

They don't mean what they say, 
But make yourself agreeable 
And let them have their way — 

Gusher {interrupting). Oh, hush up ! Let's have a game of euchre. 
How glad I am the Prof, ain't got me by the choker. 

[Seats himself in a revolving chair and sings — Second variation, tune the old con/ 
died on .] 

" Class please come to order, let the roll be called ; 
At the number of tardy ones, I'm appalled : 

Let each one remember, 

And hold well in mind, 

That for three tardy marks 

A zero he'll find. 

137 



This work in German of you all doth require 
That to pronounce as well as I, you aspire. 

Let him that heareth it 

The German translate, 

And know that from this plan 

I'll never abate." 

[ The boys seat themselves for a quiet game of cards while the hours speed a7,<av. The 
clock strikes ii :oo. Upson sings; tune, Upidee.\ 

Upson. The morn is passing swift away, 

Tra la la, tra la la ! 
We've wasted full three hours in play, 
Tra la la, la la ! 
We're safer here than trying to state 
The graceful curves lemniscate, 
Upidee, etc. 

Triangles, angles, cubes and squares, 

Tra la la, tra la la ! 
We'll trade to-day for suites and pairs, 

Tra la la, la la I 
To-morrow is the reckoning day, 
But now we'll puff our cares away, 

Upidee, etc. 

Gusher {interrupting). Come, Ups, let's to our hated task — the ex- 
cuse. 
What plea can we now furnish to the Profs 
For non-appearance on the recitation racks ? 

Ups. I hardly know ; my health is much too good 
For plea of sickness ; yes, and furthermore 
As I was coming from the Sem I met 
Prof. B , who seemed to think that I was lost. 

[Gush sings: Tune, " The Kerry Dancer s"] 

Oh ! the trouble and trial we're put to 

Just to make our excuses good ; 
If it were only at our option 

Just to go or to stay as we would ! 

Chorus: But the Faculty think it's dreadful 
One recitation to skip a week ; 
And excuses must be rendered, 

Or the Faculty our parents seek. 
How we work for them ! 
How we slave for them ! 
Heed their every nod. [Repeat first verse.] 

138 



Downes (sings: Tune, "Mermaid") 

We're wasting time, we'd better haste ; 

But how can we make an excuse. 
We can hardly say 'twas the god of sleep, 

That would be much too thin a ruse. 

Chorus: Oh, perhaps we'd better say 
" Unavoidably detained," 
While we look the Prof right straight in the eye, 

And keep conscience down below, below, below. 
And keep conscience down below. 

[ They proceed to write the excuse and then depart for chapel. ~\ 



Scene III. A great crowd of students have gathered in the college hall, 
waiting for the chapel doors to open. In front of the building a few 
dignified Seniors, arrayed in dress suits and silk plugs may be 
seen playing duck on a rock. S. J. H., H. F. B., and A. E. E., 
with Upson Downes and several Senior boys, are sliding down a 
length of the Bib sidewalk adjusted firmly aslant against an old oak 
tree, while a number of Preps are grouped around in an attitude of 
wondering astonishment. 

Prof (looking out of his window from the third story, and soliloquizing). 
See how those Seniors pass the precious hours away ! 
A low third grade awaits them on examination day. 
Not one of them should get on Kirk, if I but had my way. 
Like silly boys, the precious hours they waste in boisterous play. 

[Refrain from popular college song arises to his ears.] 

Chorus. "It's the way we have at Northwestern, 

It's the way we have at Northwestern, 
It's the way we have at Northwestern, 
To drive dull care away." 

First Voice. Oh, who stole the Bib sidewalk ? 

Chorus {Air, " A?nerica "). 

" So say we all of us. 
So say we all of us, 

So say we all. 

So say we all of us, 

So say we all of us, 

So say we all of us, 

So say we all." 

139 



{White singing, the crowd surges towatds the hall-way, the red-headed men of the 
Junior class to the front. When once within the the hall, a scene of the wild, t 
confusion ensues. Hats, books, umbrellas, over coats ■, arms and heads are thrown 
this way and that. There are a few stifled cries for mercy, but these are lost in 
the chorus of voices that continue singing. ] 

Chorus {Air, " Cheer, Boys, Cheer 7") 

Crowd, boys, crowd ! we come with song and shouting, 
Crowd, boys, crowd ! let's raise the college yell 
Boisterous and loud — the Sophomores are spouting, 
And Seniors, Freshmen, Juniors the chorus loudly swell. 
Here comes a Bib, boys, let's fry him on the griddle, 
Crowd, boys, crowd ! — let's treat him to our best. 
Now, all together, pass him down the middle — 
' Wipe off your bin, Chib — pull down your vest.' 

Chorus: Crowd, boys, crowd — your eye on Prexy's door-knob, 
Crowd, boys, crowd — let's raise the college yell ! 
Fitz Boom Bah, boys-N. W. U. Bob ; 
That's the way we do when we hear the chapel bell. 

Crowd, boys, crowd ! No more of books this morning j 
Crowd, boys, crowd ! shove your pony up your cuff. 
Make way for Beauty — her lip is curled in scorning ; 
Even when the Co-Ed's near, the boys are awful rough. 
Here comes the dude, boys j let's give him a reception ; 
Dress coat, open vest, Jove, but ain't he swell ! 
Starch yields to crowding — in that there's no deception ; 
Crowd, boys, crowd ! when you hear the chapel bell. 

Chorus: Crowd, boys, crowd — when Prexy turns his door-knob, 
Crowd, boys, crowd — let's raise the college yell ! 
Fitz Boom Bah, boys-N. W. U. Bob ; 
That's the way we do when we hear the chapel bell. 

[Enter Dr. Joe from his den, where trembling culprits had often faced their doom. 
After glancing sternly round beneath his bowed spectacles upon the awe-struck 
crozvd, he thunders forth :] 

Dr. Joe. Whence this unseemly uproar in these stately college halls? 
Why echo such discordant roars along these classic walls ? 
This sacred spot, in vain for fitting reverence calls ; 
Where is my sturdy henchman of the blouse and over-alls ! 

[Enter Pete Johnson, the squire, jingling a large bunch of keys from his index finger. 
Sings: Air, " The Shepherd Boy"} 

Pete Johnson. I come from haunts where onions blow, 
Where ham and doughnuts rally ; 
Where freckled babies thrive and grow, 
Fed, washed and spanked by Sally. 

140 



The rising odors scent the air 

With fragrance sweet as roses, 
And yet the Fems ascend the stair 

With ringers on their noses. 

I carry wood and coal, and keys, 

And ring the bell for chapel ; 
Absorbin' learning, if you please, 

While munchin' of an apple ; 

A conning o'er my A B C's, 

Although you may not think so. 
Ah, ha, me lads ! you needn't think 

I don't know why you wink so, 
But all the same I know my name, 

Although you may not think so. 

[Enter chorus of Sems from the cloak-room. While they are singing Dr. Joe retires 
into his den, and the crowd begins to surge toward the chapel door.] 



Scene IV. This scene is in pantomime. The prompter steps before the 
foot-lights and recites, while the Northwestern Band plays a slow 
accompaniment. The scene is illiwiinated, now and then, by vivid 
flashes of red and green . 

Prompter. — Then, rising from the dingy basement depths, 
Old Peter came; Old Pete : who oft on summer days 
The chapel stove with naming brands had crammed, 
But when the deep snow mantle pressed the earth, 
And horrid frosts by night bedeck'd the window panes 
And start the rusty nails deep sunk in wood 
With thunderous report, no fire built, 

;Jc ^c ■%. ^ 

Endured, by Jo : the king ! the keys he bore 

Against all force, and swept the dusty floors, 

His hair the semblance of a burdock patch ; 

His stubby beard surrounds his sooty face ; 

His blue jeans pants by one suspender hung, 

Forthwith the door he stalks, the bolts withdrew — 

In streams the host of Freshmen, Soph and Jew, 

Both Greek and barb, third class and Seniors, too, 

Press in. Their eyes the cheerless walls survey, 

A dim expanse where length and breadth and space 

And time are lost, especially is time ; 

Here beardless Sophs the giddy Fern. Sem. woo ; 

Here Fresh and Soph their ancient feud renew ; 

141 



Here Joe, as ruler, bears his awful sway, 
And by decision more embroils the fray. 

Scarce pass the crowd within the chapel doors 

Before a universal hubbub fast arose, — 

The sound and tramp of feet, the din of blows 

Fast falling, with cries j one loud, long shriek, 

At which the maidens faint and blanch the strong man's cheek. 

Bold shouts and whistles loud, mad threats of rage 

Unspeakable. O'er head the hymn books flew 

With deadly hiss, and pointed with such skill, 

That whom they smote naught on his feet could stand 

The horrid shock, and cry of hostile men, 

Hard fists on foreheads crack, with sob and groan, 

While dust flies up in clouds and blots the sun; 

Fierce press the Sophs, with blows and imprecations loud, 

Till one strong breasted youth a seat uproots, 

And with its load of hats, umbrellas, rubbers, books 

And canes uplifting high in air, 

And on the foremost Sophs impetuous flung. 

Infernal clamor far more fierce arose ; 

Earth shook. Hell heard the sound thereof, the dome 

Of heaven split and rolled together like a scroll. 

* * * * 
Within his dungeon dark Joe heard the sound, 
Uplifts his massive head, his eyes did blaze, 
His other parts besides uprears, and bulk 
As huge as fables name of monstrous size, 
Created vast, that swim the ocean stream, 
And called his legions, angel forms, who wing their flight 
Towards chapel. A horrid front they stood, 
All wrapped in meditation deep, and other clothes 
Scarce thought they of. And first of all, Dan Bonifield 
Was there, a cherub bright, who fiercest was and best 
Of those who sat beneath the iron rule of Joe. 
To him bright virgins paid their vows and songs 
And amorous ditties, all the summer's day. 
Next him came Robert B., sea monster huge, 
Who upward man and downward fish did seem, 
Who oft at chapel prayers did peek to see 
What Freshman, Soph or Junior bold bent not the knee ; 
And Baldy, too, a grizzly terror stood to all 
Who sought his wisdom to acquire. 
The rest were long to tell, though far renowned, 

142 



Though of their names no heavenly record now 
Does stand, but blotted out has been for years. 

They pass the doors, the turmoil melts away 

As waves subside when sunshine parts the clouds. 

All eyes were turned to view the coming group 

Of prophets gray, and straight the crowd by stamping caught 

The step of each, and so tramped with them, 

Till Joseph turned his beaming eye around, 

And glared below in rage and pain commingled : 
" Why will ye descrate this holy place 

Entrusted to the rites of Christian faith ! 

Be it ordained that any kid found playing tricks 

Or cutting monkey shines will be expelled, 

And banished stand forevermore." 

Then, taking up the Book of books, he read, 
" The Lord spake once again and said " — 
" Let that disturbance cease ! If once again it's heard, 

I'll make it hot for some one on the farthest row of seats ; 

I silence only wish to hear, 

And mighty little of that." 

Then read the hymn, and conjured all to sing. 

A maiden fair the organ then assails, 

Pulls out its lungs, pumps in some wind, 

And prances up and down the scale like Zulus 

At a dried snake fetish, 

And with preamble sweet of diverse notes, 

Both chords and discords play so all might catch 

The strain, and waken raptures ne'er before supposed 

Existed. It floats and dies away, then rising, 

Swells the chorus like a hotel gong on fire. 

No voice exempt, all swell the strain like mad ; 

All those who ne'er before could sing joined in, 

And those who sang not, whistled. 

So wild a wail arose that Peter heard the sound 

And trembled. 

And then Prof. P., the mildest-mannered man 

Of all who sat upon the rostrum high, 

Arose and fixed his eyes of lovely brown 

Upon the ceiling, while a solemn awe 

Came o'er the hearts of all who bowed in prayer. 

The Freshman thought him of his distant home, 

And once more wandered in the vacant fields 

Where harvest moons had often seen him toil. 

143 



Forgotten was the grind of college days ; 
The zero-tens for lessons unprepared ; 
The schemes concocted by the wily Sophs 
Which he must straightway scheme to circumvent ; 
But when the deep amen was heard, he knew 
It was the signal for recurring strife, 
And straight the tumult once again arose. 
And now the Doctor rears himself upright 
And looks of menace at the Freshmen darts. 
No man so bold of front but that he quails ; 
Dismay and fear possess the bravest hearts. 
A moment now, while silence reigns supreme, 
He stands, and then in thundering words he pours 
Out all his soul. ' It seems, that yester-night 
While all the good and pure were lost in sleep, 
Some few there were, Beelzebub inspired, 
So far forgetful of their man's estate 
And Christian character — to steal, forsooth, 
The Bib side-walk, that kept their tender soles 
From sinking hopeless, in the miry slough. 
The men who did this deed so vile, are known ; 
Let them confess, and thus their faults atone.' 

* * 

The voice majestic scarce had ceased to roll 
Adown the aisle, when from their seats arose, 
With many a kick and push and tussle wild, 
The throng of students. Freshmen strove with Sophs 
And with each other. Together fighting swept 
The mighty onslaught to the chapel doors. 

[Exit prompter zvhile the scene changes. J 



Scene V. Prompter steps from behind the scenes, and recites in an ani- 
mated voice. 

Prompter. The chapel o'er, bursts wide its doors, 
And forth the thronging tumult pours. 
Some, arm in arm pursue their way ; 
Some, all alone, though quite as gay. 

Behold that meditative youth 
Who treads the earth as though, in truth, 
He'd force by gaze and stride to yield 
Some hidden treasure, there concealed. 

144 



Behold, again ! the treasure's his, 

For see that smile spread o'er his phiz ; 

How quick he runs adown the walk 

To find, I'm bound, his flame, Miss Squack. 

Yes ; 'tis the truth. {Exit Prompter.'] 

Gusher {betraying deep inward emotion, and adjusting his mustache). 
Miss Squack, my heart in throbs ecstatic'ly 
Would thump my waist-coat, were it mine 
To see thee — 

Miss Squack {disdainfully). Sir ! methinks thy frame 
Of mind befits quite apt thy name. 
Pray, tell me what is this thou'dst do ; 
Art thou requesting me to view ? 

Gusher {interrupting her'). Mistake me not, but hear my cries, 

Thy sudden tone doth me surprise ; 

I cared not on thee now to gaze, 

Nor e'en thy beauty now to praise ; 
{Aside). Didn't I get that off in fine style, though ! 

If fault is done let it be mine, 

I'll start anew, a different line. 

Harvard's 4-tet — for so's the talk — 

At date next month agreed, will 

Squack — 

Miss Squack. Will what ? 

Gusher {hurriedly). Will — (what a break !) — will — sing. 
I see the fates misfortune bring, 
Yet if thou'lt listen patiently 
I'll rid my soul less lengthily. 

Miss Squack. Though patience ne'er 'twas mine to boast 

And of my virtues, scarce the most, 

Yet try I will, to heed thy pains ; 

But haste thee, for the noon-tide wanes. 
{Aside). This seems quite out of place. 

I do believe he's off his — 

Gusher. I will complete. May it be mine 
To see thee to this concert fine ? 
I've bought the tickets, picked the seats, 
— Sit still, my heart ; Jove, how it beats ! — 
(1 trust she's mine ! But if she's not 
I'll get my "mon," or make it — ) 

145 



Miss Squack. Oh, Mr. Gusher, had'st thou heard 
The story of the early bird, 
Methinks thou'dst now be naming last, 
Instead of second almost passed. 

(He, aside). If I'm the bird, I wonder — 
Know thou the early bird gets — there, 
Nor with the next his choice doth share; 
Would'st thou him early emulate 
Propose two moons ahead, or wait. 

[ While talking they reach the Fern Sem, and Gusher lifts his hat and hies him to his 
club, a sadder and a wiser man.~\ Curtain. 



ACT II. Scene I. The Laboratory. Enter students from the lecture- 
room in procession. 

Chorus of Chemistry Students. 

We have written for an hour 

To the limit of our power, 
Taking notes that fell in torrents on our poor bewildered brains, 

Till the atoms there are prancing, 

And the molecules are dancing, 
To the tune of electrolysis in all its sad refrains. 

We have heard about the gases 

In their strange, mysterious passes 
To a liquid state, or solid, by the modern chemist's art. 

We've reviewed Magnesium's traits, 

And the capers of Phosphates, 
And we ought to know a dozen quantitative laws by heart; 

But we're just a little mixed now, 

And we'd like to get it fixed now, — 
Is Lavoisier a metal, or hydrocarbonate ? 

And would hydrochloric-acid 

Or a nitrate prove more placid, 
If converted by the blow-pipe to a carbonaceous state ? 

[ The members of the chorus perch themselves on their seats ; the professor mottnls to 
his desk.] 

The Professor. This hydrate, now we test for further work. 

Dissolve it in a little H 2 0. 
Feminine Chemist (aside). Oh, is my apron tied up right ? Have you 

Got all your notes ? 
Second F. C. (aside). All copied ? — Gracious, no ! 

Prof. Then in solution neutralize it well ; 

The crystals formed are common salt, we see. 

146 



Test-tube analysis will plainly tell 

That this with copper sulphate — 
Venturesome Freshman {who has been pouring cold water on a hot 

glass plate ; sotto voce). Jimminy ! 
Prof. Or with Magnesium sulphate — 
V. F {aside). There goes more 

Of my six dollars — mostly gone before ! 

I'll have to swear right off on oyster stews, 

And cheat the Lakeshore Club of half my dues. 
Prof. Forms interesting compounds. That is all. 
Student. Professor, all my test-tubes are too small. 

[As the Professor departs for a neiv supply, the chemists prepare for work. Txvo 
jfuniors recommence their little flirtation, which is published as a serial, and the 
ambitious Gusher feelingly sings] : 

Oh, I'd a professor of Chemistry be ; 

I would triturate my little goatee, 

And I'd be on hand with alkali 

If a speck of acid met my eye ; 

Or on my dust-pan bear away 

The flasks and beakers smashed each day, 

And I'd speak with a frown few mortals ken, 

If a Sophomore trifled with Hydrogen. 

[ To revive the class after this effort, the Public Benefactor comes up with refreshments} . 

P. B {murmurs). For the sake of one fair maiden — deary me ! — 
I must pass my gum around to all, you see. 
I'll be generous as I can, 
With my cakes of Yucatan, 
For perhaps 'twill bring me nearer unto she. 
[The Patronizing Senior nozv enters from the Second Year Laboratory.] 

Pat. Sen. I view you with pleasure, my children dear ! 
I did all that you're doing now, last year. 
And I really must say, 
In your amateur way, 
You are getting along very nicely in here. 

[The Laboratory bell strikes. The chemists prepare to leave the stage.] 

Closing Chorus. 

Farewell Tungsten, Boron, Uranium, 
Good-bye Chlorine, Zinc, and Titanium ; 

Long live Ethane, 

Graphite, Methane ; 
Till we all meet again, 
Here's to Cyanogen ! [Exeunt.] 

147 



Scene II. Downes and Gusher are seen coming from the door of thru 
boarding place together. Downes sings to tune of 11 Clementine : " 

Downes. Ananias, Ananias, 

Oh the clock is striking three, 
This is Friday, down the sidewalk 

Stream the Preplings fresh and free. 
To the chapel they are hieing, 

There to hear orations grand ; 
Pompous Fourth Years ranting wildly 

For their home and native land. 
Come, my room-mate, let us join them 

In that bleak, historic hall j 
Gusher. Oh, the deuce ! I'm for the Fem Sem, 

I am deeply moved to call. 
Downes. Ananias, beg your pardon, 

But you make me very tired ; 
Make the ladies also weary, — 

Come, you spooney, you'll get fired. 

[Gusher meditates ', goes with Downes, they enter Prep. Chapel and take seats in t lie- 
gallery.] 

Gusher. Jove, it smells just as it used to, 

All the windows just as bare ; 
Drop your eye on my initials, 
Deep I carved them over there. 
Downes. Hush, you duffer, can't you tumble ! 

Don't get wrought into a stew ; 
Don't you see that the Professor 
Has his optic fixed on you. 
Gusher subsides. The Professor rises and sings to the tune " Zion "] 

Professor. J. Saltpeter Verdant Junkins, 
Now will edify your thought, 

About Washington, the hero, 
How he lived and how he fought. 

[funkins, with great majesty comes upon the stage, and with great majesty sings \ 
Junkins. Gen'ral George he was the chiefest 

Of the men of ev'ry time, 
Won his battles, ruled the nation, 
Passed away in death sublime. 
Such a model, fellow Preplings, 

Now inspires you to be great ; 
Be like him, a mighty hero, 
Lead an army, rule a state. 

148 



[Junkins retires amid thunders of applause. Gusher looks weary and mutters "Chest- 
nuts," with a big C] 

Downes {Tune C/ementine.) 

See that Fourth Year in the corner, 

Looks as though he had some style ; 
Guess I'll seek an introduction, 

He'll make a frater worth the while. 

Gusher. Caesar, how you talk of fraters, 

Men and schemers, all that stuff ; 
Won't you give a man a minute — 

Downes. Shut up, Gusher, that's enough. 

Why, the frat would go to ruin, 

If the men were all like you ; 
Frequent visits to the Fem Sems, 

Seldom will its ranks renew. 

Now, I'm going to catch that fellow, 

With the bright and open eye ; 
My opinion : he's a dandy, 

If we lose him I should die. 

Gusher. What a fool you are, my Upsie, 

Thus to labor for the frat. 

Downes. Not as great as you, my Gusher, 

Gusher. Oh, look there now, who is that ! 

Downes. That's the chief and high arch devil, 

Who directs the rival frat ; 
He's a sharper and a schemer, — 
Wonder what he's driving at. 

[ Chapel is dismissed, they go out and mingle with the crowd in the hall. ] 

Downes. Caesar's ghost, he's got the Prepling ! 

Feeds him taffy on his speech ; 
Takes him off to drink at Garwood's 
Hangs beside him like a leech. 

Never mind, fraternal Gusher, 

We'll come here another day ; 
With us, no single rival rusher 

Can so smoothly walk away. [Exeunt.] 



149 



Scene III. Curtain rises upon the base ball ground, on the campus. 
Game of foot ball between Lake Forest and N. W. U. about to begin 
Vast crowd of students and others assembled to witness the ganti 
Ananias and Upson seen sitting apart, conversing in undertones. 

Ananias — Air, " The last Rose of Summer " 
Say, Upson, old fellow, 

I'm sad and forlorn, 
My witching enchantress 

Has laughed me to scorn ; 
The night is so dreary, 

The day is so long, 
I'm pining away for 

The merry, mad throng. 
Just because L. F. U. 

Wiped the earth with Racines, 
They've got the impression 

That they are some beans. 
So down here they are 

With the best they can muster, 
And the boys say the game '11 

Be a regular " Jim Buster." 
[The game is called. Ananias and Upson secure the best places for observation.} 

Upson. Well, I'm ready, "get busy," 

The Umpire's called play, 
And Ikey, our center, 

In his own fancy way, 
Passed the ball back to half 

With a comical quirk, 
And it landed ahead 

Forty feet in the dirt. 
Ananias {forgetting his disappointment and growing interested) 
Well, what imp of darkness 

Suggested that foul, 
Now hear how they'll raise 

Their unanimous howl, 
See the poor referee 

Try to lay down the law, 
While each man about him 

Keeps wagging his jaw. 
Upson. But look out, what a la la ; 

Have they stopped him ? gee guns ! 
Well, who would have tho't it ; 

How that fellow runs ! 

150 



L. F. U. may have weight, 
L. F. U. may have muscle, 

But when our boys play ball, 
They must get up and rustle. 

Ananias. Well, for my part I can't see 

The ghost of a joke, 
In being spun round 

Like a splintered old spoke, 
Being kicked, cussed and carved, 

Blacked and blued toe to head, 
Sat down on by twenty 

And then left for dead. 

Upson. The first half, the boys 

Were pretty well beaten, 
But they're nobly avenging 

The crow they have eaten ; 
See them haul down that Half-back 

And ride round his collar, 
Till the poor fellow's diaphragm 

Won't even holler. 

Ananias {becoming still more interested). 

Well now I do hope they will 

Knock them clear out, 
For laying off Charlie 

Because he was stout, 
His muscles expanding 

Set so much air in motion, 
It rolled over them 

Like the waves of the ocean. 



Upson. 



Again they go at it 

With all of their might — 
And who could demand 

A more beautiful sight, 
Than the manly encounter 

In this pleasant play 
Between the men of to-morrow, 

The boys of to-day. 

But see the smooth leather 

Sails into the air 
In play by the Half-backs, 

An unexcelled pair ; 

151 



The ball and the man 

Both come down quite near, 
And the man takes an acre 

Of dirt from his ear. 

[Game becomes exciting. N. W. U. gives its yell ; L. F. U. gives hers, but in no 
exulting tone.\ 

Ananias. And now for the finish, 

The boys are just even, 
And all with their stout 

Manly bosoms a heavin , 
Stand firm in their tracks, 

Determined to do 
The best for themselves 

And for N. W. U. 

Upson. Jack fondles the ball 

With a gentle caress, 
Then glides thro' the throng 

Like a lightning express. 
Now it's passed to the Captain, 

Who with a fleet run, 
Sends the ball high and dry, 

And the game's nobly won. 

[Crowd disperses, amid wild cheering by N. W. £/".] 

Ananias and Upson {duet). Hurrah for the game, 
Hurrah for the boys, 

Hurrah for the crowd, 
Hurrah for the noise ; 
Hurrah for the sport 

In which there's no harm, 
And hurrah for the ladies 

Who helped us along. \_Extunt7\ 

[Curtain Falls.] 



ACT III. Scene I. A room in the Asylum. Time, 6.30 P.M. Ana- 
nias and Upson, en deshabille, discussing the ever present question 
— " to call or not to call." Chorus offish horns and harmonicas from 
adjoining room. 
Solo — Ananias {Sings : Air, " Chippie get your hair cut") 
Chummy get your jeans on, 

Jeans on, jeans on, 
Study up your almanac, 
Study hard. 

152 



Solo — Upson D. 



Chummy wash your face clean, 

Face clean, face clean, 
Chummy brush your whiskers, 
Brush them smooth. 



Duet — A. & U. D. {Joining hands and dancing around) 

We are going to the Fem, 
For to call upon a gem, 
And her name begins with M, 
She's a jimmy dandy. 

Upson D. Judas, Priest ! Who shall I call on? 

I don't know but seven or eight ; 
Only one of them has money, 
And I know she's got a date. 

Two are pretty, two are witty, 
Three as homely as a fence ; 

In the whole conglomeration, 
Not a penny-worth of sense. 

Ananias. Dear chum where are your manners ? 

Did you leave them, with your brains, 
In the little old log homestead 
Of your daddy, on the plains ? 

After two whole years of training 
Under Bonny's watchful eye ; 

Still you fail to love the fair sex, 
And of calling fight so shy. 

Why it makes my pulses quicken 
Just to speak a woman's name ; 

And to ring the Fem Sem door-bell, 
Sweeter is than wealth or fame. 



[Exit.] 



Scene II Fem Sem parlor. Upson D., having sent his card up for the 
fourth ti??ie, is shaking in a corner. Ananias and M. F., are enjoy- 
ing (?) themselves in another. Ananias has just finished a shocking 
tale of college scrapes ; but the maiden doesn't shock worth a cent, 
and sings. 

Solo — M. F. {Tune, "Merry Little Mountain Maid. 11 ) 
I'm a jolly little Fem Sem maid. 

As with the college dudes, 
I wander down the Lake Shore drive 

(You know what it includes) ; 

153 



I flirt with the Seniors tall, 
And with the Freshmen small, 
And with the young but wicked Preps 
As they stand in the college hall. 

{Speaks). Please choke off your ancient chestnuts ; 

College pranks so beastly old 
That I'll bet you'll find they're covered 

Forty inches deep with mold. 
Now, just listen, and be quiet 

While a tale I shall unfold, 
That is young and crisp and juicy, 

One you never have heard told. 

CURFEW MUST NOT RING TO-NIGHT. 

{Expurgated and Modei'nized Version.} 

It was evening, sunset glimmered through the oaks of Evanston, 

And the callers at the Fern Sem were arriving one by one ; 

Then the maidens coming downward on the stairway, flight by flight 

Struggled to keep back the murmur : 

1 Curfew must not ring to-night ! ' 

" Nellie," whispered they in chorus, pointing to the parlors cold, 

With its walls so dark and gloomy, walls so ugly and so old, 

" We have callers in that parlor, whom we fain would mash to-night j 

If the curfew rings so early, all our hopes are blasted quite." 

" Dean has gone unto a concert," " We will give you all that's right," 

" Only please to just remember, 

' Curfew must not ring to-night.' " 

" Girls," said Nellie, speaking slowly — every word came to their minds 

Like a zero-ten from Bobby, or like one of Baldy's grinds — 

" These three years I've swung that curfew up and down the Fern 

Sem halls, 
Every evening, before sunset, it has echoed from the walls, 
And (unless I have inducements) I can't help you in your plight ; 

If I did, the Dean would bounce me. 

Girls, the curfew rings to-night." 

Then the Ferns held consultation and they raised ten shekels there, 
But good Nellie would not listen to their blandishments so fair ; 
So they formed a combination — stole the clapper from the bell, 
Then went in to see the callers and told them about the sell ; 
All were happy for three hours, and time passed with hurried flight ; 

Although Nellie shook the handle, 

Curfew did not ring that night. 

154 



It was over, and the callers 

Slid out through the darkened halls, 

While the maidens talked it over 

With their transoms draped with shawls. 

From the concert came Dean Bancroft, 

At the Fern Sem all was dark, 
And there was no sign or token 

That the girls had had a lark. 

When you tell of college " horses," 

Please do not forget us quite ; 
But remember how it was that 

Curfew did not ring that night. 

[ Curfew rings, and callers depart tiunultuously — to " The Dead March in San/."] 



Scene III. Hintnan Hall. The President calls the society to order. 
A mighty knocking is heard at the door. 

Prex. Will the Sergeant near the entrance 

Open wide the outer gate ? 

[Enter Doumes and Gusher, followed by a crowd of Adelphics.~\ 

Downes. Don't look cranky, Mister Prexie, 

We're but fifty minutes late. 

Prex. Silence there, you saucy meddler ; 

Do you think you run the town ? 

Downes. Let me rest, my lord, I'm weary, 

From yon altitude come down. 

[An Adelphic tosses the Prex an apple, which he munches and seems mollified.] 

Prex. Now our literary program 

Let us amply carry out. 
Hinmanites ! display your talents ; 
Sing, effuse, debate and spout. 

[ The Secretary reads program and hands it to the President. ] 

Prex. Riley M., now rise and tell us 

How Dan Webster answered Hayne. [pauses'] 

What, not here, my faithful Riley ! 
Now, this truly gives me pain. 

Well, we'll to the next one turn us. 

Of our programs we are proud — 
Lengthy D., propel your carcass 

Out before the staring crowd. 

155 



[ There is fearful suspense; L. D. does not appear. Prex. shows signs of embarrass- 
ment. Picks up program, and continues :] 

My melodious co-adjutor, 

Harold H., please heave in sight ; 
Lift your matchless voice to heaven, 

With your solo wake the night. 

[A trembling and diminutive Freshman rises from among the rear seals, and cries] 

Harold H, told me to tell you 

That he was too tired to sing. 
Paid me well and gave me soda, 

Thus, the message here to bring. 

Prex {with desperation). Next in order is the question 
To be handled in debate ; 
On the issue of this handling 
Hangs its everlasting fate. 

Speakers four, now take your places ; 

Gusher there, and Upson Downes, 
Step you forward to the rostrum, 

Don you our judicial gowns. 

[ Upson and Ananias take seats upon the platform, and survey the society with great 
dignity. There is a continued pause; no debaters appear. Consternation seizes 
the Prex, and Downes and Gusher creep to their seats. The Prex controls his 
feelings and sings. ] 

Now our program to the finis 

Has with great success been brought ; 

My time in office is exhausted, — 
Vote to-night we surely ought. 

[Great commotion at the door. Riley M., Lengthy D., Harold H., the four debaters, 
and many other Hinmanites file in.] 

Prex. Now, before we pass the sceptre 

To the next elected man, 
We would like to read a statement, 
How we lead the college van. 

Secretary (rises and reads report for term). 

Members who belong to Hinman 

Aggregate just twenty-eight ; 
Number fired for pious conduct 

It is needless here to state : 
Meetings held for the past quarter 

Make a net result of two \ 
Members ill, were twenty-seven, 

Twelve of them ont yet pulled thro'. 

156 



Amount of money due to Hinman, 

Thirty dollars, — may be more ; 
Amount of money yet collected, 

Twenty cents in copper ore. 
Number members who are married, 

Foot the register at one ; 
Number members anxious to be — 

Twenty-seven strong, or none. 
Prex. {rising) Let me, sirs, congratulate you 

On the high, successful state 
To which your Hinman has developed, 

In these stirring months of late. 
We surrender up our office, 

Feeling that through ages long 
Shall be known how our devotion 

Rendered Hinman great and strong. 

[The report is received with great enthusiasm. They proceed to elect a neiv adminis- 
tration. Curtain falls. ] 

Scene IV. Serenade. Time, 10:30 P. M. Place, their room ; Gusher 

and Downes at their desks. 
Gusher {suddenly). Upsie, old boy, what say you now 

To the prospect of a musical row ? 

No longer, forsooth, will I doze or squirm 

Over a long and obscure psychological term ; 

Both head and heart unmistakably call 

For a breath of fresh air, and the Co-Ed. hall ; 

Get on your coat and clear your throat, 

And we'll be there before you know it. 
Downes {yawning). Come off! If these fair maidens there 

Are as sleepy and stupid as I am here, 

They'll welcome undisturbed repose 

As every sensible person does [puts up his books'] . 
Gusher {energetically). Upson Downes, do I hear aright ; 

In stupid slumber wilt spend this night? [a pause] 

If the pale moon, whose silvery beam 

Struggles through the quivering green, 

Or those bright stars whose beauty shines 

Within the Fem Sem's close confines ; 

Or heavenly harmony, murmuring breeze, 

Tempt thee not to forget thine ease, 

I'll set 'm up to Garwood's best, 

If you'll but do as I suggest. 

157 



Downes {immediately reversing the operations of the last few minutes). 
I believe I do feel like a walk ; 
Brace up ! let's go without more talk. 

[ Gusher parts his hair in the mathematical center, and they set out to the tune of " In 
the Spring-time, gentle Annie," by Gusher.] 

[The Fern Sem.~] 

Gusher. My poor heart beats so like a drum j 
They'll surely hear me as I come. 

girls ! dear girls ! I'm in such a nutter, 
My tongue'll be tied and will refuse to utter 
The burning words to melodious strains, 
To rouse from slumber your wearied brains. 

Downes {in deep disgust). You poor, afflicted, susceptible cuss ! 

Gusher {unheeding). Come, Upson, come ! to the West we'll go, 
For there rooms the fairest of maids, you know. 

Downes {resignedly). Eh, heu ! All right ! go ahead, old fellow ; 
You take the lead as you're the more mellow. 

[They ensconce themselves under the trees and talk in stage whispers.] 

Gusher {soliloquizing). Now all is still and slumber sound 
Broods o'er all this region round ; 
Within those walls by the moonbeam's light, 
Spirits of beauty — 

Downes {impatiently). O say, brace up ! put those words to music. 

Gusher {reproachfully). Upsie, my son, speak not in jest 
Of poetic rapture, the highest and best ; 

1 fear your thoughts on Garwood's dwell ; 
But, come now, let our harmony swell. 

Downes. All right. Let 'er go, 
I'll follow your lead ; 
Start something we know 
And let's proceed. 

[ Gusher hums a tnoment, clears his throat and begins] 

Sweet lady, come list at thy window, 

While our friendship for thee we reveal — 

[Several windows are closed violently.] 

Downes. Say, 'Nias, hold on ! that doesn't seem to take ; 
It looks as though we had made a break. 

158 



Gusher. No, Upsie, I'll tell you what's the matter, 
That sounds too much like common clatter ; 
I'll sing them something full of devotion, 
That'll set these dear girls all in commotion. 

[Sings in a high key: Air, " Maid of Athens "] 

Maid, of all the maids most fair, 

Sweeter than the summer air ; 
In whose eyes of heavenly blue, 

Nought but loveliness I view. 
Hear me now ! To thee I sing ! 

To thee myself an off' ring bring ; 
By the pale moon I swear, 

Thou of beauty art the heir. 

[ Two or three windows open; a chorus of feminine voices ejaculate " scat! shoo-o-of ' 
etc., and a debilitated hair-brush falls at Gusher's feet.] 

Dowxes (from behind a tree). I say, old man, is this the commotion 
That you hoped to raise by your devotion ? 
I think you'd better exclaim " No flowers ! " 
Or you don't know what else will come in those showers. 

Gusher {indignantly). I say, Upsie, can you tell 
What makes these girls act so like — well, 
I must confess I can't conceive 
Why me a cat they should believe. 

Downes. Since devotion doesn't pass, 
We'll try a song of another class ; 
Where fertile fancy, wild and free, 
Deals with nature " as she be ;" 
By cats ! the tune I've most forgotten, 

Let's see {hums), O yes! {pause) uh ! uh! {longer pause) by cotton ! 
I guess I'll give it up ; {suddenly) I've got him ! [Sings, with ?nore 
force than harmony; Air, " Three Crows "] 

The rising sun is in the West, 

The rapid rivers slowly run ; 
The festive calf and sportive cow, 
Exultant leap from bough to bough. 

[Applause from above.'] 

Dowxes. Guess I'll stop while I have the chance 
And my heart has the glory for which it pants. 
Come, Ananias, and set 'em up ; 
It's been some time since I sat to sup. 

159 



Gusher. I guess I'll make just one more try 
To break these girl's monotony ; 
I'll pour out all my soul in song ; 

I'll— 

Downes {emphatically). Chain that tongue and come along ! 

Gusher {beseechingly). Upsie ! let me adore beauty. 

Downes. Come, brace up ! and do your duty. [Imparts a gentle 
impulse to Gusher. ~\ 

Gusher {resignedly). Well, if so be, so let it be ; 
But girls, tomorrow I'll thee see, 
And then, once more, I'll blissful be, 
Because I'm in somewhat contiguous proximity to you, as it were. 

[ They depart to the tune of " Good-night, Ladies" in different keys. Fern emits a 
sigh of relief. ,] Curtain. 




mm 




160 



G$H*DS. 



C. B. Wr-ght. 

In faith he is a worthy gentleman 

Exceedingly well read, valiant as a lion 

And wondrous affable. 
0. M. H-W-RD. 

When I had waked him, 

Long time he stared upon me, like a man 

Astounded ; then fell upon my neck. 
G. O. B-rn-s. 

And daily it becomes more numerous. 
The Juniors. 

I think your cap is a smartish one. 
F. S. Ch-p-n. 

The down was scarce upon his chin. 
The Preps. 

What things we are. 
The Syllabus. 

We have all subscribed to it, and so must you. You must sub- 
scribe. 

W. R. P-RKS-. 

Take him off to bed. 

N-TTIE G. H-NT. 

But are you so much in love as your rhymes speak ? 
T-R-me R-YM-ND. 

As yet, thou knowest not all, my son. 
Prex oe Hinman. 

A dog's obeyed in office. 
A. B. S-w-ll. 

I know it is a sin 

For me to sit and grin. 
F. Al-b-st-r. 

His head was well re(a)d on one side but not on the other. 

J-HN H-NC-CK. 

There is among them all but this one voice. 
H-r-vy Br-wn. 

I tell you he'll refuse, flatly refuse, to obey the Imperial orders. 

161 



J. E. Gr-v-s. 

I have more understanding than all my teachers. 

W. H. N-WC-MB. 

Am not I a man ? 

O. Sh-p-rd. 

Pray can I not. 

J. P. Ad-ms. 

It would discourse most eloquent music. 
At Noon. 

There was a sound of hurrying feet, 

A tramp on echoing stairs : 

There was a rush along the aisles, — 

It was the hour of prayers. 
The Seremaders at Fem. Sem. 

And grating songs a listening crowd endures, 

Rasped from the throats of bellowing amateurs. 
Editor of Grinds. 

Art thou offended with me ? Heaven knows that odious busi 
ness was no fault of mine. 

W-LL-M Sw-NS-N. 

Earth has nothing sweet or fair, 
Lovely forms or beauties rare. 
A. S. H-SK-NS. 

And melancholy marked him for her own. 

A-N-A R-B-NS-N. 

Bright as the stars that cover thee, 
Maid of the sunny brow. 

E. H. McM-st-rs. 

I live among the cold, the false, 

And I must seem like them. 
Prof. B-rd to C-ldw-ll. 

He that hath ears to hear let him hear. 
T. C. M-ld-ng. 

Oh ! beauteous orb ensconced in circle dark. 
Geo. D-x-n. 

A charge to keep I have. 
A. E. Cr-ig. 

Why you can utter with a solemn gesture 

Oracular sentences with deep no meaning. 

F. W. P-c-ck. 

All men seemed mad to him ! 

Nature had made him for some other planet, 

162 



And pressed his soul into the human shape 
By accident or malice. In this world 
He found no fit companion. 

J— M-S McC-NN-LL. 

I walk as one who knows that he is treading a stranger soil. 
C. T. W-TR-S. 

Oh think, my son ! how wild and vain are all the dreams of 
earthly pride. 

R. K. X-SB-T. 

Some play for gain to pass time (others play for nothing). 

C. M. D-NN-Y. 

Oh. mamma ! 

F. W. B-rs. 

I do confess I abhor and shrink from schemes. 

L-LU B-RK-V. 

Of comely form she was and fair of face. 

S. A. M-LT-M. 

The fond attentive gaze of young astonishment. 

R. P. M-RT-N. 

A wag he was, he needs must own. 
And could not let a fool alone. 

J. B. Am-br-se. 

Be calm in arguing, for fierceness makes error a fault and truth 
a discourtesy. 

A-l-ce M. Gr-y. 

Exquisite beauty, that nature made so frail. 

E. E. Sc-tt. 

Less wayward let me be, 
More pliable and mild. 

Tr-v-r and J-hns-n. 

A dreary place would be this earth were there no little people in 
it. 

J. P. Gr-r. 

His chuff cheeks dimpling in a fondling smile. 

S-M-L We-R. 

We grant, although he had much wit, 
He was very shy of using it. 
M. L. W-KM-N. 

Besides, 'tis known he could speak Greek 
As naturally as pigs do squeak. 

163 



E-Z-K-L T-M-N-S-N. 

In robes of mystic meaning dressed 
Presenting Israel's prayer. 

F. M. T-sd-l. 

Latin was no more difficile 

Than to a black-bird 'tis to whistle. 

Prof. Cook. 

NOW— 

G. W. K-NTSM-N. 

The elder I wax the better shall I appear 

M-B-L B-RN-TT. 

And so a little woman, 

Though a very little thing ; 

Is sweeter far than sugar, 

Or flowers that bloom in spring. 
G. S. Gr-h-m. 

The curse of the hungry be upon you. 
C. H. Z-MM-R-N. 

The dust begrimes his ancient hat. 
H. R. H-w-ll. 

Three pairs of boots one pair of feet demands 
J. F. Cl-ncy. 

My limbs are bow'd though not with toil. 
Prof. Y-ng. 

The true knight of learning. 
Seniors. 

Were school-boys ever half so wild. 

W. E. H-MP-R-Y. 

Yes ! living is a painful thrill. 

F. H-BB-LU 

The woman that deliberates is lost. 

C. P. A-B-Y. 

Too late I stayed, — forgive the crime : 
Unheeded flew the hours. 

W. B. W-LR-TH. 

He who fights and runs away, 

Will live to fight another day. 
J. E. Gr-v-s. 

Let me not burst in ignorance. 
J. H. H-GG-RTY. 

At whose sight all the stars 
Hide their diminished heads. 

161 



W. T. A-LD-N. 

If shape it might be called, that shape had none 
Distinguishable in joint or limb. 

Heck Hall. 

And storied windows richly dight, 
Casting a dim religious light. 

The Freshmen. 

And ever since the conquest have been fools. 

Dr. C-mm-ngs. 

Of all those arts in which the wise excel, 
Nature's chief master-piece is writing well. 

H. G. L-N-RD. 

For truly in my youth I suffered much extremity for love. 

W. C. W-se. 

Swans sing before they die ; 'twere no bad thing did certain 
persons die before they sing. 

J. J. Sh-m-n. 

Love ! his affections do not that way tend. 

J. Q. A-D-MS. 

In youth when I did love, 
Methought it was very sweet. 

F. C. Wh-t-h-d. 

A fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. 

F. B. C-zz-ns. 

A horse ! a horse ! My kingdom for a horse. 

Soph {after cane-rush). 

Let us seek out some desolate shade and there weep our sad 
bosoms empty. 

The Medics. 

There are a crew of wretched souls 
That stay his cure : their malady convinces 
The great assay of art ; but at his touch, 
Such sanctity hath heaven given his hand, 
They presently amend. 

S-wv-r at Fem Sem. 

I take my leave of you ; 

Shall not be long but I'll be here again. 

Prof. Ph-ll-p Gr-n-r. 

He does allot for every exercise 
A several hour. 

165 



J. J. N-TT. 

A man of diverse employments. 

Cop to Bill- Poster. 

What art thou that usurp'st this time of night. 
H. C. D-v-s. 

Stand, and unfold yourself. 
Faculty in Chapel. 

Tell me, he that knows, 

Why this same strict and most observant watch. 

R-B-RT B-RD. 

With one auspicious and one dropping eye. 

R-LPH W-M-N. 

Respeaking earthly thunder. 

S. F-RL-Y. 

My way of life 

Is fallen into the sear, the yellow leaf. 
G. W. Sp-ng-r. 

Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar. 
Pete's Dinner. 

It smells to heaven. 
E. J. R-g-w-y. 

I am reckless ; what I do, I do to spite the world. 

T. J. W-DC-CK. 

O Lord, a little longer. 

A. E. Elm-re. 

Galatians, 6-3. 
S-dn-y J-HN-N. 

But though I be rude in speech, yet not in knowledge. 

Dr. B-nb-t. 

When I was young ! Ah, woeful when ! 

Nellie. 

Hark ! Peace ! 

It was the owl that shriek'd, the fatal bellman, 

Which gives the sternest good-night. 
Jac-bson. 

News, news from heaven ! Marcus the post, come, 

Sirrah, what tidings? Have you any letters ? 
C. S. Gr-v-s. 

As true as steel, as plantage to the moon. 

B. M. W-d-n. 

If he had one more feather, he would strut himself to death. 

166 



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OFFICERS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 



E. WYLLYS ANDREWS, A.M., M.D. 
FRANK E. LORD, A.B., 'Sj, 
JAMES H. RAYMOND, A.M., '71, 
MARIE HUSE WILDER, >6g, - 



'78, 



President 

Vice -Presiden t 

Treasurer 

Secretary 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

E. W. ANDREWS, '78, MARIE HUSE WILDER, '69, 

FRANK E. LORD, '8j, E. P. CLAPP, 'Si, M. M. GRIDLEY, 'Sj. 



1858. 

*fLydia M. Waugh, nee Hayes. 

1859. 

Thomas E. Annis, A.M., M.D., National Elhanon J. Searle, A.M., Lawyer, St. 

City, Cal. Louis, Mo. 

Win Evan e ston' ^ S ° rd ' A ' M " Insurance ' {Margaret McKee, Batavia, 111. 

Samuel^Eartman, A.M., Isle La Motte, trances E. Willard,^ #, Pres. W. C. T. 

Vt. U., Evanston. 111. 

Henry M. Kidder, B.S., $ A G, Business, George W. Beggs, A.M., 3> A O, Sioux 

Rialto Bldg., Chicago, 111. City, Iowa, 



1860. 



•my, 



*Alphonso C. Linn, A.B., died in 
(1864.) 

William A. Lord, A.B., $ A &, St. 
Joseph, Mo. 

Homer A. Plimpton, A.B., £ A &, Min- 
ing, Red Cliff, Col. 

William H. H. Raleigh, Ph.B., $ A 0, 
Business, Baltimore, Md. 

*Elmore Q. Searle, A.B. 

Melville C. Spaulding, A.B., Real Estate, 
348 Washington Boul., Chicago, 111. 

Frank A. Springer, A.B., Teacher, 2006 
14th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 



*Hart L. Stewart, A.B., # A G. 

f Elizabeth D. Benthall, nee Wilson, Quas- 
queton, Iowa. 

f Julia M. Jones, nee Wood, Howells, Dak. 

f Julia Miller, nee Atkins, Sheffield, Mass. 

*f Ada Marshall, nee Ward. 

*M. Louisa Medlar, nee Dake, Wood- 
stock, 111. 

f Martha J. Smith, nee Stewart, 1729 Prai- 
rie Ave., Chicago, 111. 

fMary B. Willard, nee Bannister, Berlin, 
Germany. 

*|Mary E. Willard. 



167 



James W. Haney, A.M., D.D., Rev., 
# A f), Canton, 111. 

Martin Mohler, A.B., Sec'y State Bd. of 
Agr., Topeka, Kas. 

William A. Spencer, A.B., D.D., Rev., 
Sec'y Ch. Ex. Soc, Philadelphia, Pa. 

*Warren Taplin, A.B. 

*John C. Wilson, Ph.B. 

•{•Louise B. Fitch, nee Bragdon, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

*fCelia E. Boyd, nee Stow. 

1862. 



1861. 

fLydia M. Howe, Teacher, 215 s. Peoria 
St., Chicago, 111. 

fMargaret J. Kinney, nee Shannon, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 

f Mary L. Ludlam, Evanston, 111. 

*flsabella S. Foote, nee Miner. 

•{•Georgia A. Muller, nee Bryce, 
Ohio. 



f Mary E. Shepherd, nee Bragdon 
dale, Mass. 



Canton, 

Auburn- 



D.D., Rev., Oak 



Robert Bentley, A.B 
land, Cal. 

Bennett B. Botsford, Ph.B., $ A 0, Mer- 
chant, 95 Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Isaac W. McCaskey, A.M., Gov. Service, 
790 Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 

*Henry G. Meacham, A.B., died in army, 
(1863.) 

Henry A. Pearsons, A.M., 2 X, Banker, 
94 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 



S2 



Henry M. Bannister, A.M., M.D. 
kakee, 111. 

Almus Butterfield, A.B., Com. Mer., 
South Water St., Chicago, 111. 

fFrances A. Bentley, nee Harvey, Oak- 
land, Cal. 

•{•Harriet A. Fisher 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



nee De Coudres 



William F. Rose, A.M., Rev., Pecatonica, 

111. 
David Sterrett, A.M., Lawyer, Pittsburgh, 

Pa. 
Harriett C. Furber, nee Wood, 183 25th 

St., Chicago, 111. 
Mary E. Harding, nee Clifford, Goshen, 

Ind. 
Emily M. Jones, nee Hall, Greeley, Col. 
Cornelia F. Emmert, nee Winslow, Sib- 
ley, Iowa. 
1863. 
Kan- f Aurelia M. Ferry, Long Pine, Neb. 

•{•Cornelia S. Ferry, Michigan City, Ind. 
f Louise Huntoon, nee Gamble, Laporte, 

Ind. 
*f Jennie M. Pearce, nee Wheeler, 
f Mary E. Stephens, nee Bishop, Winona, 

Minn. 
1864. 



Ph.B., Farmer, 



£ K W, Busi- 



Frederick J. Hutchings, 
Northfield, 111. 

Milton C. Springer, A. M 
ness, Wilmette, 111. 

George E. Strobridge, A.M., D.D., Rev., 
<P K W, Yonkers, New York. 

1865. 

Charles C. Bragdon, A.M., $ K W, Prin- 
cipal Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, 
Mass. 

*Melvin A. Pingree, A.B., $KW (1866.) 

Elbert B. Wheeler, Ph.B., $ K W, 
Farmer, Arlington Heights, 111. 

fEmilie G. Bishop, Oregon, Wis. 

186 

James Frake, A.M., $ K W, Lawyer, 86 
La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Liston H. Pearce, A. M., D.D., Rev., Bal- 
timore, Md. 

Joseph C. Thomas, A.B., Rev., 805 Broad- 
way, New York. 

Arthur J. Wheeler, A.M., Rev., Sparta, 
Mich. 

•{•Alice S. Comstock, Evanston, 111. 



fCornelia A. Holyoke, nee Wheeler, 
Evanston, 111. 

fClausine B. Mann, nee Borchsenius, 
Orange, N. J. 

jBelle Wallace, nee Denning, Paris, 111. 

fSarah E. Wright, nee Holmes, West- 
ford, N. Y. 



fjosephine Hill, nee Day, Ishpeming, 

Mich, 
f A. Vernette Snyder, nee Forbes, 55 Float 

St., Freeport, 111. 
+Mary E. Springer, nee Ward, Wilmette, 

111. 
■{•Martha W. Wilson, nee Richardson, 

Teacher, Potter, Neb. 



•{•Ellen E. Garnsey, nee Bradley, A.M., 
Evanston, 111. 

•{•Amelia E. Holcomb, Rockefeller, 111. 

f Mary E. Lott, nee White, 4045 Vincen- 
nes Ave., Chicago 111. 

+Emma J. Phelps, nee Kyle, Rogers Park, 
111. 

f Ella G. Palmer, nee Judson, 445 Broad- 
way, Indianapolis, Ind. 

•{•Mary E. Sewell, nee Wright, Teacher, 
343 N. Penn St., Indianapolis, Ind. 



168 



1867. 



John W. Bissell, A.M., D.D., Rev., Pres. 

of U. I. University, Fayette, Iowa. 
J. Howard Brooks, A.B., Rev., North 

Bend, Neb. 
William C. Comstock, A.M., $ K W, 

Commission Business, Evanston, 111. 
Morton Culver, A. M., $ K W, Lawyer, 

153 Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 
John Ellis, A.M., Rev., $ K W, Pastor 

Cong. Church, Maywood, 111. 
John B. McGuffin, A.M., Rev., # K W, 

Yorkville, 111. 



Thomas R. Strobridge, A.M., Rev., # K 
W, Princeton, 111. 

George W. Winslow, A.M., Rev., Peo- 
tone, 111. 

f Frances J. Bright, nee Roberts, Wau- 
paca, Wis. 

*fMary Ann Fisher, nee McKean. 

f Lucy I. Mappin. nee Pearsons, Elgin, 111. 

j Margaret J. Miller, nee McKean, War- 
ren, 111. 

f Harriet P. North, nee Linn, 189 Oakley 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

*fAda S. Kinsman, nee Wanless. 



1868. 



Edmund W. Burke, A.M., $ K W, Law- 
yer, 162 Washington St., Chicago, 111. 

Frederick J. Huse, A.M. M.D., 2606 
Pacific Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 

William C. Knapp, A.M., Abingdon, 111. 

-j-Annis A. Gage, Dowagiac, Mich. 

\ Nellie L. Henry, nee Case, Mason, Tex. 

*fFannie C. Lakin. 



f Annie M. Loiseaux, nee Roberts, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

f Alia M. Raymond, nee Beveridge, 379 
Dearborn Ave., Chicago, 111. 

f Elizabeth Torrence, nee Norton, 37th St. 
and Ellis Ave., Chicago, 111. 

*Marie Wilder, nee Huse, Evanston, 111. 



1869. 



Jacob R. Allen, A.M., Rev., 122 Union 
St., Freeport, 111. 

Robert Barrd, A.M., # K W, Prof. North- 
western University, Evanston, 111. 

Charles K. Bannister, A.M., £ K W, 
South Evanston, 111. 

Andrew B. Bishop, A.M.,M.D., $ K W, 
San Jose, Cal. 

Willis Butterfield, A.M., M.D., $ K W , 
Belvidere, 111. 



Hiram A. Curtis, A. M. , Rev. Juniata, Neb. 
*Albert C. Kennicott, Ph.B., $ K W. 
William M. Raymond, A.M., # K W, 

Adv. Agt., Evanston, 111. 
Charles G. Root, Ph.B., $ K W , Business, 

102 Boston Block, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Henry T. Scovill, A.M., Rev., # K W, 

Pawnee City, Neb. 
f Fannie J. Best, nee Stout, Bloomington, 

111. 



1870. 



William H. H. Adams, A.M., D. D., Rev. 
# K W, ex-Pres. 111. Wes. Univer- 
sity, Bloomington, 111. 

William D. Best, A.M., Rev., Jackson- 
ville, 111. 

Rollin P. Blanchard, Ph.B., Lawyer, 49, 
115 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

MerrittC. Bragdon, A.M., M.D., 2 X, 
Evanston, 111. 

Thomas Craven, A.M., Rev., Missionary, 
Naini Tal, India. 

Michael Finity, A.M., Missionary, Ind. 
Ter. 

Joseph H.Gill, A. M., Rev., Southold,N. Y. 

Ira B. Henry, A.M., Rev., Mason, Tex. 

Albert D. Langworthy, A.B., 2 X, Au- 
rora, 111. 

Amos W. Patten, A.M., D.D., Rev., 
Aurora, 111. 

William Plested, A.M., Clerk Co. Court, 
Trinidad, Col. 

Homer Potwin, A.B., 950 Madison St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Levi VanFossen, Ph.B. 



Frederick C. Winslow, Ph.B.,M.D., 21, 

Jacksonville, 111. 
fElla E. Hussey, nee Badger, Franklin 

Grove, 111. 
fElla Merwin, nee Bannister, Detroit, 

Mich, 
f Ellen L. Pierce, nee Davis, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 
\ Alice G. Shepard, nee Galloway, 86 New 

Ins. Bldg., Milwaukee, Wis. 
f Florence L. Knapp, nee Galloway, Fond 

du Lac, Wis. 
f Emeline Badger, nee Green, Amboy, 111. 
*f Frances Green. 
fAnna L. Davis, nee Marcy, Evanston, 

111. 
fFannie Gradle, nee Searles, care Dr. 

Gradle, Central Music Hall. Chicago, 

LI. 
fEliza Powell, nee Thompson, 478 E. 

Broad St., Columbus, Ohio. 
fElizabeth R. Sullivan, nee White, S. 

Evanston 111. 
f Lily R. Webster, nee Winne, Evanston, 

111. 



1871. 



Daniel O. Fox, A.M., Rev., Missionary, 

India. 
*Edwin D. Gould, A.B. 
Sanford H. Mclntyre, A.M., Teacher, 

Negaunee, Mich. 
Amos H. Miller, A.M., Rev., Plainfield, 111. 
Albert B. Norton, A. B., Missionary, India. 
Charles W. Pearson, A.M., $ K W, Prof. 

Northwestern Univ., Evanston, 111. 
Arthur W. Penney, Ph.B., Business, 161 

La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 
James H. Raymond, A.M., Lawyer, 225 

Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 
Ozro Roys, A.M., Rev., Lewiston, Me. 
Richard D. Russell, Rev., A.M., Bushnell, 

111. 
Edwin R. Shrader, A.M., Prof. Univ. So. 

Cal., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Herbert W. Woodruff, A.M., Rev. 

Hamilton S. Wicks, Ph.B., 2 V, Jour- 
nalist, K. C. Commercial, Kansas City, 
Mo. 

Levi S. Wilcox, Ph.B., M.D., Cham- 
paign, 111. 

George L. Yaple, A.M., Hon., 2 X y 
Lawyer, Mendon, Mich. 

f Amelia J. Foster, nee Conwell, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

f Josephine C. Gibbs, South Evanston, 111. 

fCora H. Merrell, Evanston, 111. 

*fAlice A. Wilcox, nee Yaple, Cham- 
paign, 111. (March, '88). 

fMary E. Yaple, nee Hankinson, Men- 
don, Mich. 



1872. 



Ellery H. Beal, A.M., Rev., 2 X, Frank- 
fort, 111. 

*Thomas S. Berry, A.M. (former Presi- 
dent Simpson College). 

George E. Bragdon, Ph.B., 2 X, Busi- 
ness, Pueblo, Col. 

James E. Burke, A.B., 2 X, Lawyer, 
Aberdeen, Dak. 

Curtis H. Castle, A.B., M.D., Merced, 
California. 

Lorin C. Collins, A.B., Hon., 2 X, Judge 
Cir. Court, Cook Co., Norwood Park, 
111. 

Lewis P. Davis, A.M., Rev., <? K W , 291 
Hancock Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Robert B. Edwards, A.B., Lawyer, Lin- 
coln, 111. 

Eltinge Elmore, Ph.B., 2 X, Business, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Edwin J. Harrison, Ph.B., 2 X, Business, 
Sauk Center, Minn. 

John M. Johnson, A.B., Rev. 

Mather D. Kimball, A.B., Business, 
Ravenswood, 111. 

George Lunt, Ph.B., 2 X, Com. Mer., 
102 Washington St., Chicago, 111 

Hiram H. Palmer, A.B 
City, Mo. 



Church, 
Mo- 



Edwin C. Arnold, A.B, 

Sacramento Ave. M. E. 

13 10 Adams St., Chicago. 
Lewis Butterfield, A.B., Business, 

mence, 111. 
Henry A. Cooper, Ph.B., 2 X, Lawyer, 

Racine, Wis. 
F. W. Cleveland, Ph.B., £ K 2, South 

Evanston, 111. 
John M. Dandy, A.B., $ K2, Journalist, 

89 Clark St., Chicago, 111. 
Byron H. Eldredge, C.E., LaGrange, 111. 
Chauncey Gaines, A.M., $ KW, Business, 

Berkeley, Cal. 
Fred M. Husted, A.M., $ K W, Lawyer, 

Berkeley, Cal. 



Clarence R. Paul, A.B., 2 X, Private 
Secretary to Senator Cullom, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Wilbur O. Peet, A.M., Rev., Livonia, 
N. Y. 

Fred D. Raymond, A.B., 2 X, Treas. J., 
A. & N. R. R., 511 Royal Ins. Bldg., 
Chicago, 111. 

James F. Robinson, A.M., 2 X, Banker, 
Rock Island, 111. 

Fernando Roys, A.B., M.D. 

Amos L. Smith, A.B., Lawyer, Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 

Herbert M. Thiers, C.E., 77 Clark St., 
Chicago. 

Edmund B. Woodson, A.B., Business, 
Remington, Ind. 

fRoxy Haney, nee Doe, Plankinton, Dak. 

fDevonia Hills, Rockford, 111. 

f Ella L. Horton, La Crosse, Wis. 

fMartha H. Scott, nee Huntoon, 18 S. 
ioth St., Minneapolis, Minn. 

fMary L. Martin, Waukegan, 111. 

f Anna C. Cumnock, nee Webster, Evans- 
ton, 111. 
1873. 
Rev., $ K W, Henry Green, A. B., Lawyer, Sterling, 111. 

William King, A.M., Evanston, 111. 

Draper A. Lindsay, A.M., Lawyer, Far- 
go, D. T. 

*John R. Leslie, Ph.B. 

Wm. J. Minium, A.M., Rev., Farmington, 
111. 

Adolphus H. Needham, A.M., Rev., $ K 
W, Berkeley, Cal. 

Edward L. Parks, A.M., D.D., Rev., 
4> K W, Gammon School of Theolo- 
gy, Atlanta, Ga. 

Lee J. Pitrter, A.B., Real Estate, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

fEmma V. Bannister, nee White, South 
Evanston, 111. 



Editor, Kansas 



170 



1874. 



♦Frank M. Beatty, A.B., $ K 2. 

Henry S. Boutell, A. M., LL.B., B B 77, 
Lawyer, ist Nat. Bk. Bldg., Chicago. 

Alex. D. Brainard, A.B., Lawyer, Blair, 
Neb. 

David W. Casseday, C.E., $ K 2, Real 
Estate, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Chester T. Drake, C.E., 2 X, Manufact- 
urer, 160 S. Clinton St., Chicago, 111. 

Wm. C. Estes, C.E., <£ K2, Neligh, Neb. 

Oscar L. Gibbs, C.E., Business, South 
Evanston, 111. 

Joseph M. Hawkes, A.B., B S II, Jour- 
nalist, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Richard G. Hobbs, A.M., Rev., B G II. 
Urbana, 111. 

DeForest M. Hyde, C.E., £ K 2, Lum- 
ber, Appleton, Wis. 

Matthias S. Kaufman, A.M., Rev., New 
Bedford, Mass. 

Wm. M. Knox, A.M., 2 X, Journalist, 
London Herald, London, Eng. 

Charles Leach, Ph.B., Rev., Hueneme, 
Cal. 

Martin O. Lewis, A.B., Lawyer, 99 Ran- 
dolph St., Chicago, 111. 

Eli McClish, A.M., D.D., Rev., Prin. 
Grand Prairie Seminary, Onarga, 111. 



Wm. L. McGarry, Ph.B., Lawyer, Dav^ 
enport, Iowa. 

Wm. L. Martin, A.B., # K 2, Business, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Wm. Omelvena, A.B., Rev., Rockville, 
Ind. 

John W. Richards, A.M., Rev., Piano, 111. 

Daniel C. Riehl, A.M., Rev., 2 X, Reed 
City, Mich. 

Wm. B. Robinson, A.M., Rev., Milton, 
Wis. 

Andrew J. Scott, A.M., 2636 Groveland 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

John W. Scott, A.M., M.D., Ness City, 
Kas. 

Gilbert M. Simmons, Sc.B., $ K 2, Busi- 
ness, Kenosha, Wis. 

George H. Smith, A.M., Rev., Sing Sing, 
N. Y. 

James Trewartha, A.B., Rev., Clark, Dak. 

Oscar W. Willitts, A.M., Missionary, 
Pekin, China. 

Melville C. Wire, A. M., Rev., Presid- 
ing Elder, Portland Dist., Salem, Ore. 

Thomas J. Zeigler, A.M., Rev., B Q II, 

(?) 
Rebecca Childs, nee Roland, Ph.B., Ev- 
anston, 111. 



1875. 



George A. Babbitt, A.B., Reporter, 618 
West Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 

Joseph H. Bates, A.B., M.D., # K 2, 
Neponset, 111. 

♦Charles H. Burke, A.M. 

Lucius C. Colman, A.B., <P K 2, Lum- 
ber, La Crosse, Wis. 

John J. Crist, A.B., Rev., B II, Spring 
Valley, Wis. 

♦John W. Dickson, A.B., $ K 2. 

Charles A. Gaskell, A.M., Publisher, 234 
La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Albert D. Gillespie, Sc.B., Draughtsman, 
84 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Cortez J. Goodenow, Sc.B., B O IT, Busi- 
ness, Granite Falls, Minn. 

John H. Hamline, A.B., 2 X, Lawyer, 
Portland Block, Chicago, 111. 

Frank A. Hills, A.B., Farmer, Oregon, 111. 

Frank M. Harris, C.E., 2 X, Business, 
Kansas City, Mo. 

James L. Harrison, A.M., Rev., Worces- 
ter, Mass. 

Robert B. Hosteller, Sc.B., # K 2. 

Robert Lewis, A.B., Lawyer, 99 Ran- 
dolph St., Chicago, 111. 



Charles E. Lambert, A.M., East Oakland, 
Cal. 

Henry K. Metcalf, Ph.B., Rev., Elm- 
wood, 111. 

John T. Ray, Ph.B., Teacher, Spring- 
field, 111. 

Albert R. Robinson, A.M., Prin. Dore 
Public School, Chicago ; Hinsdale, 
111. 

James F. Stout, A.M., Rev., B S II, St. 
Paul, Minn. 

Charles W. Turner, A.B. 

Herman H. Unland, A.B., $ K2, Busi- 
ness, Cimarron, Kas. 

Thomas Vanscoy, A.M., D.D., Rev., Pres. 
Willamette Univ., Salem, Ore. 

Francis M. Warrington, A.M., Rev., 
BOn, Florence, Cal. 

Emily F. Wheeler, A.M., Student, Bryn 
Mawr Coll., Pa. 

George H. White, Ph.B., Lawyer, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 

Amy C. Morse, nee Kellogg, Ph.B., Dur- 
and, Wis. 

Emily W. Minium, nee Wheadon, Farm- 
ington, 111. 



1876. 



Nathan R. Allen, C.E., Business, Keno- 
sha, Wis. 



William S. Arnold, A.M., Prof. Willa- 
mette Univ., Salem, Ore. 



Alanson S. Appleton, A.B., 2 X, Jour- James E. Bell, A.B. v Rev., Bedford, Pa. 
nalist, Pullman Bldg., Chicago, 111. Smith S. Bradford. A.M., Rev., Traer, Ia- 



171 



1876.— Continued. 



Walter Lee Brown, Sc.B., Chemist and 
Assayer, Metropolitan Blk., Chicago. 

Leonard G. Cochran, A.M., Rev., New 
Hampton, Iowa. 

♦Drayton L. Connell, C.E., <£ K 2(1883). 

John Currer, A.M., Rev. 

Charles M. Ellinwood, Ph.M., Prof., Ne- 
braska Wesleyan Univ. , Lincoln, Neb. 

Theophilus B. Hilton, A.M., Rev., 2 X, 
Fremont, Neb. 

Charles W. Hudson, A.B., Business, 
Waukegan, 111. 

Francis M. Jones, C.E., Pueblo, Col. 

John Krantz, A.M., Rev., Newark, N. J. 

Frank W. Lord, A.B., M.D., Druggist, 
Piano, 111. 

Lafayette E. McGarry, Sc.B., Teacher, 
Callao, Mo. 

Samuel C. McPherrin, A.M., Lawyer, 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Andrew W. McPherson, A.B., B II, 
Teacher, Rockford, 111. 



Winfield S. Matthew, A.M., Rev., 2 X, 
Dean Coll. Lib. Arts., Univ. So. Cal., 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Earl F. Potter, C.E., # K 2, Civ. Eng., 
Huron, D.T. 

Frank H. Scott, A.M., LL.B., B II, 
Portland Blk., Chicago, 111. 

Fred. M. Taylor, A.M., Ph.D., 2 X, 
Prof. Albion College, Albion, Mich. 

*Samuel E. Van Petten, A. 15. 

Charles P. Wheeler, A.M., 2 X, Nor- 
wood Park, 111. 

John A. J. Whipple, A.B., Rev., <? K 2, 
Mendota, 111. 

Jessie Hilton, nee Brown, A.M., Fremont, 
Neb. 

Etta S. Linn, B.L., Bird City, Kas. 

*Emma E. Weller, nee Parks, Ph.B. 

Mary Pattison, Ph.B., Freeport, 111. 

Jane E. Kryder, nee Pattison, Ph.B., Ore- 
gon, 111. 



1877. 



Howard R. Antes, A.B., Rev., Windsor, 
Col. 

Edwin J. Bickell, A.M., Rev. (Ed. Mon- 
tana Christian Advocate), Helena, 
Montana. 

Timothy C. Bradley, C.E., Kansas City, 
Mo. 

Frank M. Bristol, A.M., D.D., Rev., 
$ K 2, Pastor Trinity Church, 2519 
Indiana Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Albert H. Burr, Ph.B., M.D., 1255 Wa- 
bash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Wm. W. Carr, Ph.B., Rev., BOH, 
Peoria, 111. 

Frank F. Casseday, Ph.B., M.D., # K 2, 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Alfred Cook, A.M., Journalist, Piano, 111. 

Frank H. Cutler, Sc.B., M.D., Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa. 

Kobert E. Earll, Sc.B., Smithsonian Insti- 
tution, Washington, D. C. 

Albert D. Early, A.B., 2 X, Lawyer, 
Rockford, 111. 

E. B. L. Elder, A.M., Rev., Glen Elder, 
Kas. 

Frank M. Elliot, B.L., 2 X, Real Estate, 
Evanston, 111. 

Wm. G. Evans, A.B., 2 X, Real Estate, 
Denver, Col. 

Wm. J. Hathaway, A.M., Rev., Paw 
Paw, Mich. 



♦Clarence A. Gardner, Ph.B., <P K 2. 
Arthur S. Kimball, A.B., B II, 644 

Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 
Frank E. Knappen, A.M., 2 X, Lawyer, 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Charles L. Logan, A.M., B.D., Rev., 

Bishop Creek, Cal. 
Oliver P. McCool, A.M., B II, Busi- 
ness, Freeport, 111. 
Charles H. Morgan, A.M., B.D., Rev., 

Adrian, Mich. 
Luther Anderson Norland, A.M., 2 X, 

Ranchman, La Jara, Cal. 
Lorenzo T. Potter, B.L., M.D., $ K 2, 

West House, Sandusky, Ohio. 
Cornelius E. Rice, A.B., Teacher, Sturgis, 

Mich. 
Martin S. Robinson, Jr., CD., # K 2, 

Street Car Railway, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Robert B. Seaman, A.M., Rev., Minonk, 

111. 
Charles W. Thornton, A. M. , Rev. ,B0II, 

St. Charles, 111. 
DelosM. Tompkins, A.M., Rev., B II., 

Freeport, 111. 
Anna A. Elder, nee Davis, B.L., Glen 

Elder, Kas. 
Elizabeth R. Hunt, M.L., A T, Evanston, 

111. 
Marion L. Matthew, nee Pomeroy, Ph.B., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



1878. 



George E. Ackerman, A.M., D.D., Rev., 

B n, Buffalo, N. Y. 
E. Wyllys Andrews. A.M., M.D., 2 X,6$ 

Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 
George M. Bassett, A.M., B.D., Rev., 

Ashton, 111. 



52 



Wm. M. Booth, A.M., 2 X, Lawyer 
Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

Abner Clark, A.B., Rev., Auburn, 111. 

Wm. L. Demorest, A.B., Rev., 2 X 
Walnut, 111. 

John R. Edwards, A.B., Cortland, 111. 



172 



1878.- Continued. 



Conrad A. Haney, A.B., Rev., $ K 2, 

Kankakee, 111. 
Wm. H. Harris, A.M., 2X, Lawyer, 229 

Broadway, N. Y. 
Clarence H. Harvey, Ph.B, 
Junius C. Hoag, Ph.M., M.D., # K 2, 

2970 Indiana Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Frank S. Johnson, A.M., M.D., # K 2, 

4 Sixteenth St., Chicago, 111. 
Jacob Kagey, A.B., County Supt. Public 

Schools, Buena Vista, Col. 
Louis Karcher, Ph.B., $ K W, Lawyer. 

163 Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 
Edward M. Kinman, A.M., B S 77, Jack- 
sonville, 111. 
*Cyrus F. Kryder, B.L., Rev., B $ 77 

(1884). 
Joseph T. Ladd, A. M. , Rev. , Wheaton, 111. 



Frank Macard, A.B., Rev. 

Rasmus Nielson, A.B. 

Charles S. Northrop, B.L., Lawyer, Nord- 
land, Iowa. 

Charles H. Quereau, A.M., Business, 
Aurora, 111. 

Charles L. Root, Sc.M., <P K W, Lyons, 
Iowa. 

James M. Wheaton, A.M., Rev., Wyanet, 
111. 

Mary E. Garst, B.L., Coon Rapids, Iowa. 

Bertha G. Goodwin, B.L., Teacher, Rock- 
ford, 111. 

Mary E. King, nee Parks, B.L., St. Law- 
rence, D.T. 

Ida Breed, nee Stuart, A.B., Teacher, 
Belvidere, 111. 



1879. 



Edward C. Adams, A.M., M.D., $ K2, 
Watertown, D. T. 

Isaac E. Adams, A.M., B & 77, Lawyer, 
90 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Charles E. Cook, A.B., M.D., Mendota, 
111. 

Dexter P. Donelson, A.B., 2 X, Busi- 
neus, 234 Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

Wm. A. Hamilton, A.M., B & 77, Law- 
yer, 90 La Salle St. Chicago, 111. 

Hugh Harrison, Ph.B., Business, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Henry B. Hemenway, A.M., M.D., Kal- 
amazoo, Mich. 

Wm. T. Hobart, A.B., B 77, Mission- 
ary, Pekin, China. 

Thomas H. Hood, Ph.B., B 77, Law- 
yer, Opera House Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

George H. Horswell, A.M., B.D.,Ph.D., 
$ K W, Instructor N. W. U., Evans- 
ton, 111. 

Douglas V. Jackson, B.L., 3> K 2, Law- 
yer, Muscatine, Iowa. 

Wm. B. Leach, A.M., Ph.D., Rev., Chi- 
cago, 111. 



Spencer Lewis, A.M., Rev., Miss., China. 

James T. Musgrove, A.M., Rev., B 77, 
Argo, Col. 

Edward L. Stewart, Sc.B., 2 X, Lawyer, 
179 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

Frank E. Tyler, Sc.B., # K 2, Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Wm. H. Wait, A.M., B 77, Prof., 111. 
Wes. Univ., Bloomington. 111. 

George W. White, Ph.B., Rev., Beloit, 
Wis. 

Ella V. Ambrose, B.L., Decorah, Iowa. 

Mary Bayne, B.L., Warren, 111. 

*Lilla M. Hemenway, nee Bradley, B.L. 

Lillie C. Musgrove, nee Casey, Ph.B., 
Argo, Col. 

Jessie McPherrin, nee Moore, A.B., Kan- 
sas, City, Mo. 

Sarah E. Patten, nee Prindle, Ph.M., 
Aurora, 111. 

Clara B. Shumway, B.L., Polo, 111. 

Isabella B. Parks, nee Webb, A.M., At- 
lanta, Ga. 

Jane H. White, Ph.M., Teacher, Evans- 
ton, 111. 



1880. 



Joseph Coombe, A.B., Rev., Catlin, 111. 
Nathan S. Davis, Jr., A.M., M.D., 2 X, 

65 Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 
Frank B. Dyche, A.B., $ K 2, Lawyer, 

123 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 
Charles A. Foulks, Ph.M., M.D., 2 X, 

47th and State Sts., Chicago, 111. 
Almon W. Greenman, Ph.B., Missionary, 

Presiding Elder, Puebla, Mexico. 
Charles H. Hamilton, Sc.B., $ K 2, 

Miller, Ottawa, 111. 
Sidney M. Harris, A.B., A K E, Her- 
man, Minn. 
George W. Hewett, A.M., Lawyer, 

Orange City, Iowa. 
Robert B. Jessup, Ph.B., M.D., 2 X, 

Vincennes, Ind. 



Duston Kemble, A.M., D.D., Rev., Del- 
aware, O. 

John E. Lipps, Ph.B., 2 X. 

George Merritt, A.M., B.D., Oswego Cen- 
tre, New York. 

Charles J. Michelet, A.B., Lawyer, Opera 
House Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

Wm. B. Norton, A.M., B.D., Rev., B 
77, Earlville, 111. 

John H. Pry or, A.B., £ K W, Newell, 
Iowa. 

Elias F. Shipman, A.M., M.D., Reming- 
ton, Ind. 

Nels E. Simonsen, A.M.. B.D., Rev., 
Prin. Norw. Theo. Sem., Evanston, 
111. 



173 



1880.— Continued. 



Levi P. Warrington, A.B., M.D., Jack- 
sonville, 111. 

Thomas C. Warrington, A.M., B.D., 
Rev., Lemont, 111. 

Francis A. Wood, A.M., Student, Got- 
tingen, Germany. 

Bessie Helmer, nee Brad well, A.M., 1428 
Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Nellie A. Barnes, nee Lewis, B.L., Joliet, 
111. 

Dolly V. Purcell, nee Mesick, B.L., Plain- 
well, Mich. 



Helen L. Miller, Ph.B., 390 La Salle 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Emma Lacy, nee Nind, Ph.B., Instructor 
in Anglo Chinese College, Foo Chow, 
China. 

Ellen M. Pryor, Ph.M., Moline, 111. 

Cassie M. Cushing, nee Scott, Ph.B., 
Highland Park, 111. 

Ettie L. Smith, A.M., La Porte, Ind. 

Julia D. Thompson, nee Watson, Ph.B., 
328 Superior St., Chicago, 111. 

Mary E. Rice, nee Webster, B.L., Evans- 
ton, 111. 



1881. 



Frank T. Andrews, A.M., M.D., "2 X, 65 
Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

Arthur H. Briggs, A.M., B.D., Rev., B 
77, College Park, Cal. 

John P. Brushingham, A.M., Rev., $ K 
W, Pastor Ada St. M. E. Church, 
548 Fulton St., Chicago, 111. 

John C. Butcher, A.M., M.D., A T, 
Missionary, Moradabad, India. 

Wm. R. Chamberlain, Ph.B., A T, Law- 
yer, Chicago, 111. 

EbenP. Clapp, A.M.,M.D.,Evanston,Ill. 

Joseph M. Cormack, A.M., Rev., A T-> 
Wallace, 111. 

Moses S. Cross, A.M., B & II. 

Raymond V. DeGroff, Sc.B., 2 X, Prin- 
cipal of Schools, Fulton, 111. 

-Geo. A. Foster, A.B., B & II, Business, 
147 5th Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Walter B. Helm, Sc.B., M.D., Rockford, 
111. 

Wm. H. Huston, A. B., War Department, 
S. G. O., Washington, D. C. 

Horace N. Herrick, Ph.B., Rev., Pres. 
Fort Wayne Coll., Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Benjamin B. James, A.M., Business, 
Chicago. 

"Wm. H. Lacy, A.M., B.D., Rev., $ KW, 
Instructor in Anglo Chinese College, 
Foo Chow, China. 



Joseph A. Matlack, A.M., B.D., Rev., 

<£ K W, Freeport, 111. 
Nathan C. Miller, Ph.B., A T, Lawyer, 

Nat. Bank Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
James E. Nichol, A.M., Rev., Maxwell 

Iowa. 
Frederick Porter, A.M., Rev., A T, 360 S. 

Paulina St., Chicago, 111. 
Frank L. Rice, Sc.B., # K 2, Boiler 

Manufacturer, Evanston, 111. 
John Schneider. A.M., Rev., Ripon, 

Wis. 
Claudius B. Spencer, A.M., Rev., <PK2, 

Owosso, Mich. 
Polemus H. Swift, A.M., B.D., Ph.D., 

Rev., AT, Rockford, 111. 
Frank H. Thatcher, Ph.M., B Q 77, Law- 
yer, Aurora, 111. 
Parker S. Webster, A.M., A T, Lawyer, 

Dubuque, Iowa. 
Frederick S. Wheeler, A.M., Business, 

Phoenix Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
Elizabeth C. May, nee Mc Arthur, A.M., 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
Jane H. Cormack, nee Marshall, B.L., 

A #, Wallace, 111. 
Emma P. James, nee Meserve, A.B., A $, 

Englewood, 111. 
Martha G. Pooley, nee Skelton, Ph.M., 

2502 Indiana Ave., Chicago, 111. 



1882. 



Stanley P. Black, Ph.B., M.D., # K 2, 
Cook County Hosp., Chicago, 111. 

Alvah G. Briggs, A. B., B & H, Business, 
Sierra City, Cal. 

~*Wm. F. Carroll, A.B., B 77 (1885). 

James S. Conwell, Sc.B., # K 2, Busi- 
ness, Los Angeles. Cal. 

Charles W. Darrow, Sc.B., Lawyer, Glen- 
wood Springs, Colo. 

Wm. A. Dyche, A.B., # K 2, Druggist, 
65 Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

Walter A. Evans, A.M., B.D., Rev., A T. 

Nathan J. Harkness, Ph.M., Rev., A T, 
872 Sheffield Ave., Chicago. 



John Lee, A.M., E.D., Rev., Lockport, 

111. 
Robert E. McPherrin, A.B., A T, Busi- 
ness, Ottumwa, Iowa. 
Frank W. Merrel), A.M., B.D.,Rev., # 

K W, Dwight, 111. 
Peter D. Middlekauff, Ph.B., A T, Editor 

Deerin% Farm Journal, Chicago. 
Harry H. Miller, Sc.B., 73 G 77, Real 

Estate. 1 5 13 Farnham St., Omaha, 

Neb. 
William Otjen, A.B., Rev., Albany, 111. 
Charles E. Piper, A.M., $ K W, 175 

Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



174 



1882— Continued. 



Robert H. Pooley, A.M., B.D., Rev., A 

F, 2502 Indiana Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Fred H. Sheets, A.B., Rev., B 77, 

Oregon, 111. 
Jessie S. Brown, nee Cowles, Ph.B., 

Omaha, Neb. 
Emily M. Hobart, nee Hatfield, A.M., 

Pekin, China. 



Lydia L. Jones, A.M., K K F, Berlin, 
Germany. 

Emma M. Middlekauff, nee Prindle, Ph.B., 
Ravenswood, 111. 

Adele Hall, nee'Somtxs, B.L., 3 131 Michi- 
gan ave., Chicago. 111. 

Ella M. Tarr, M.L., A F, Teacher, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

*Sarah E. White, Ph.B., A F. 



1883. 



John C. Bannister, A.M., B & II, Teacher, 

Princeton, 111. 
Henry O. Cady, A.M., B.D., Rev., A V, 

Missionary, Chung King, China. 
Asahel H. Denman, Ph.B., Lawyer, Des 

Moines, Iowa. 
Martin M. Gridley, Ph.B., £ K 2, Law- 
yer, 101 Washington St., Chicago, 111. 
James T. Hatfield, A.M., B 77, Student, 

Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, Md. 
Alfred E. Hills, A.B., A T, Tiller, North 

Park, Col. 
Frank E. Lord, A.B., B 77, Lawyer, 

101 Washington St., Chicago, 111. 
Wm. A. Phillips, Ph.B., M.D., $ K 2, 

Evanston, 111. 
Louis S. Rice, Ph.B., $ K ^, Business, 

Evanston, 111. 
Charles H. Sharer, Ph.B., B II, Asst. 

Postmaster, Mt. Morris, 111. 



Amos R. Solenberger, Ph.M., M.D., $ K 
W, Itasca, 111. 

Merritt E. Taylor, Sc.M., Student, Johns 
Hopkins Univ., Baltimore. 

Nelson P. Webster, Ph.B., 1220 H St., 
N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Wm. E. Wilkinson, A.M., B.D., Rev., 
# K W, Warren, 111. 

Anna L. Crandon, Ph.B., A F, Evanston, 
111. 

Emily Greenman, Ph.B., North Manches- 
ter, Ind. 

Harriet A. Kimball, Ph.M., A T, In- 
structor N. W. U., Evanston, 111. 

Minnie R. Goodsmith, nee Moulding, 
B.L., A $, Lake View, 111. 

Mary E. Clapp, nee Norton, Ph.B., 
Evanston, 111. 

Isabella Ross, Ph.B., Music Teacher, 425 
Park Ave., Chicago, 111. 



1884. 



Wilbur F. Atchison, A.B., Rev., A T, 
Des Plaines, 111. 

Leon E. Bell, A.B.,Rev., A V. 

Wm. H. Crawford, A.B., Rev., <£ K W, 
895 Fulton St., Chicago, 111. 

Albert D. Currier, Sc.B., 2 X, Lawyer. 
Chicago, 111. 

Charles Horswell, A.B., $ K W, In- 
structor, G. B. I., Evanston, 111. 

George P. Merrick, B.L., 2 X., Asst. 
Solicitor A., T. & S. F. R. R., Rialto 
Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

Edmund B. Patterson, A.B., Rev., Ben- 
ton Harbor, Mich. 

Charles G. Plummer, B.L., M.D., A T, 
Chicago, 111. 



Charles S. Raddin, Sc.B., $ K 2, Busi- 
ness, Evanston, 111. 
Wm. D. Sargent, A.B., <P K 2, Business, 

Evanston, 111. 
Zella F. Adams, M.L. 
*Mary A. Bennett, A.B., A T. 
Florence M. Cowles, nee Call, B.L., Al- 

gona, Iowa. 
Leila M. Crandon, M.L., A F, Instructor 

N. W. U., Evanston, 111. 
Mary A. Sheets, nee Hill, B.L., A F, 

Oregon, 111. 
Adella G. Maltbie, M.L., A $, Prof. U. 

I. U., Fayette, Iowa. 
Helen M. Horswell, nee Redfield, Ph.M., 

A F, Evanston, 111. 
Frances Simpson, B.L., K K F, Teacher, 

Decatur. 111. 



1885. 



Owen Battey, A.B., A T, Colorado 
Springs, Col. 

David H. Bloom, A.B., LL.B., 73 77, 
Lawyer, Cherokee, Iowa. 

Samuel L. Boddy, Ph.B., B II, Law- 
yer, Cherokee, Iowa. 

Wm. C. Chase, A.B., Business, Quincy, 
111. 



Frank Cook, A.B., A T, Supt. Public 

Schools, Geneseo, 111. 
Wm. D. Fullerton, A.B., B 77, Law 

Student, Columbia Coll., New York. 
Edward D. Huxford, Sc.B., B 77, 

Banker, Washta, Iowa. 
Wm. R. Light, A.B., Teacher, Wichita, 

Kan. 



175 



1885. -Continued. 



Rush McNair, A.B., M.D., # K W, 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Eugene E. McDermott, Sc.B., A T, 
Elocution Student, Evanston. 

GerhardtC. Mars, A.M., B.D., Rev., # K 
W, Prof. Eng. Lit. and History, 
Univ. of Dakota, Vermillion, Dakota. 

G. A. Mulfinger, A.B., Rev., 506 South 
Robey St. Chicago, 111. 

Leonard L. Skelton, A.B., A T, Medical 
Student, C. M. C, Evanston, HI. 

Charles S. Slichter, Sc.M.,.2 X, Instruc- 
tor, U. of W., Madison, Wis. 



Sydney Watson, Sc.B., 2 X, Real Estate, 
19 Lizzie St., St. Paul, Minn. 

Charles A. Wightman, Ph.B., .2 X, Busi- 
ness, Evanston, 111. 

Mary Henry, A.M., .4 #, Evanston, 111. 

Mary E. Moore. B.L.,^4 4>, Wenona, 111. 

Ellen M. Bloom, nee Sawyer, Ph.B., A $, 
Cherokee, Iowa. 

Kate L. Sharp, Ph.B., K K T, Teacher, 
Elgin, 111. 

Mary B. Wilkinson, nee Swail, Ph.B.. 
A #, Warren, 111. 

Nellie F. Weeks, Ph.B., Student, Berlin, 
Germany. 



1886. 



Stuart P. Edmondson, Ph.B., Rev., $ K 

W, Hammond, Ind. 
Robert I. Fleming, A.B., Rev., A T, 

3030 Portland Ave., Chicago. 
Joseph H. Hill, A.B., $ K W, Prof. 

Kansas State Normal School, Em- 
poria, Kansas. 
Henry L. Kindig, A.B., 2 X, Rev., 

Waveland, Ind. 
Lyman O. Perley, Sc.B., # K W, Law 

Student, Emporia, Kansas. 
Chester A. Place, A.B., Rev., Student, 

G. B. I., N. Evanston. 



Edwin A. Schell, A.B., Rev., $ K W, 

South Bend, Ind. 
Clinton S. Tomlinson, Ph.B., B <-J II, 

Real Estate, Kansas City, Mo. 
Caroline C. Bumann, B.L., 2827^ East- 

on Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
Minnie E. King, A.B., Evanston. 
M. Ada Peart, Ph.B., A $, Teacher, 

Braidwood, 111. 
Anna O. Peterson, B.L., Galva, 111. 
Mary E. Van Benschoten, B.L., K K T, 

Evanston. 



1887. 



Wilber J. Andrews, Ph.B., <Z> K W, Ev- 
anston. 

Hugh D. Atchison, A.B., A T, Student, 
G. B. L, Evanston. 

Charles H. Brand, B.L., A T, Bank 
Clerk, 100 Washington St., Chicago. 

Fred M. Byers, Ph.B., Kirkland, 111. 

Frank J. Campbell, Ph.B., 3> K W, Stu- 
dent, C. M. C, Chicago. 

Smith C. Davis, A.B., Student, G. B. I., 
Evanston. 

David H. Gloss, Ph. B., Evanston. 

Truman R. Greene, B.L., Rev., Ireton, 
Iowa. 

Guy Greenman, Ph.B., Student, U. C. of 
L., Chicago. 

Winfield S. Hall, Sc.B., M.D., <Z> K W, 
Mercy Hospital, Chicago. 

Giles Hubbard, A.B., 2 X, Lawyer, Ev- 
anston. 

George I. Larash, A.B., A V, Student, 
G. B. I., Evanston. 

Charles G. Lewis, A.B., B & II, Evans- 
ton. 

Wm. E. McLennan, A.B., Rev., $ K W, 
New Carlisle, Ind. 

Frank G. Middlekauff, Sc.B., A T, Clerk, 
Evanston. 

Wm. C. Raymond, Sc.B., 411 Ridge Ave., 
Evanston. 

Edwin L. Shuman, Ph.B., 2 X, Pres. 
N. W. U. Press Co., Evanston. 



Ruter W. Springer, A.B., 2 X, Exam- 
iner of Patents, 43 B Street, S. E., 
Washington, D. C. 

Bond Stowe, A.B., M.D., B f) II, St. 
Luke's Hospital, Chicago. 

Herbert P. Wright, Sc.B., 2 X, Bank 
Clerk, American Bank B'ld'g, Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Charles N. Zeublin, Ph.B., B II, Stu- 
dent, Yale Divinity School, New 
Haven, Conn. 

Kate M. Ailing, A.B., KKT, Asst. Prin. 
High School, Lewiston, 111. 

Lodilla Ambrose, Ph.B., Librarian N. W. 
U., Evanston. 

Henrietta M. Coon, Ph.B., A $, Teacher 
in High School, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Josie B. Nash, nee Crandon, Ph.B., A T, 
Columbia Falls, Me. 

Mary E. David, Ph.B., A $, Joliet, 111. 

Janet C. Gloss, Ph.B., Teacher Jennings 
Seminary, Aurora, 111. 

Ida M. Harvey, A.B., Teacher, Chicago. 

Lizzie A. Leek, nee Hill, Ph.B., A $, 
Teacher, Wilmette. 

Helen M. Holden, B.L., Baraboo, Wis. 

Matilda P. Hutchison, Sc.B., KKT, 
Mineral Point, Wis. 

Anna C. Towle, Ph.B., A #, Evanston. 

Frances Towle, B.L., A 2>, Evanston. 

Albertine C. Wales, Sc.B., A $, Lanark, 
111. 



176 



1888. 



George A. Bass, Ph.B., $ K W, Business, 
Evanston. 

Perkins B. Bass, A.B., $ K W, Teacher, 
Evanston. 

Charles S. Bennett, Ph.B., W T, Evans- 
ton. 

Charles H. Booth, Ph.B., <£ K W, Law 
Student, Chicago, 111. 

Columbus Bradford, A.B., A T t Holden, 
Mo. 

Henry Caddock, A.B., ~2 X, Business, 
Evanston, 111. 

Harvey R. Calkins, A.B., B & II, Stu- 
dent, G. B. I., Evanston, 111. 

Ira C. Cartwright, Ph.B., Student, G. B. 
I., Evanston, 111. 

Chester C. Clifford, Ph.B., Business, Ev- 
anston, 111. 

George L. Conley, A.B., # K W, Stu- 
dent, Morgan Park, 111. 

Eric A. Davidson, A.B., Rev., Boston, 
Mass. 

Arthur R. Edwards, A.B., B & II, Stu- 
dent, C. M. C, 2816 Indiana Ave., 
Chicago. 

Jacob W. Frizzelle, A.B., Rev., Braid- 
wood, 111. 

Isaac R. Hitt, Sc.B., 3> A &, Business, 
Evanston. 

John E. Hunt, Ph.B., B G II, Law Stu- 
dent, Evanston, 111. 

Isaac Johnson, A.B., Student, G. B. 1., 
Evanston, 111. 

Charles O. Linebarger, A.B., A T, Stu- 
dent, Chicago Med. Coll., Chicago. 

Frank Little, A.B., $ K W, Business 
Chicago. 



Norman A. Martin, A.B., Student, G.B.I., 
Evanston. 

Oscar Middlekauff, Ph.B., A V, Student, 
U. C. L., Evanston. 

Samuel H. Middlekauff, A.B., Student, 
G. B. I., Evanston, 111. 

Edward C. Page, A.B., Asst. Co. Supt. 
Schools, Mt. Morris, 111. 

Arthur Pattison, A.B., A V, Teacher, 
Chicago, III. 

Edmund C. Quereau, Ph.B., B Q II, 
Teacher, Poultney, Vt. 

George O. Richardson, Ph.B., Rev., 
Clarendon, Texas. 

Craigie S. Thorns. A.B., £ K W, Student 
Bapt. Theo. Sem., Morgan Park, 111. 

Charles B. Thwing, A.B., # K W, In- 
structor, N. W. U., Evanston. 

Frederick J. Tourtellotte, A.B., 2 X, 
Law Student, Chicago. 

Robert O. Vandercook, Ph.B., Sec'y and 
Treas. Univ. Press Co., Evanston. 

Cora Allen, B.L., A <P, Turner June, 111. 

Belle E. Ailing, Ph.B., KKT, Evanston. 

Mary H. Earle, Sc.B., K A &, Teacher, 
Franklin Grove, 111. 

Julia P. Fitch, B.L., Teacher, Aurora, 111. 

Caroline L. Hunt, A.B., A r, Teacher 
Minneapolis High School, Minneapo- 
lis, Minn. 

Ellen F. March, B.L., Bristol, Wis. 

Helen M. Pearsons, Ph.B., A $, Evans- 
ton. 

Mary E. Sumner, B.L., A <P, Schuyler, 
Neb. 

Mabelle Thatcher, Ph.B., K A Q, River 
Forest, III. 




•Deceased 

tGraJuate of Northwestern Female College. 



177 



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